50th Anniversary: 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival: Performance-By-Performance

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by WilliamWes, Jun 1, 2017.


  1. For those who know of Laura Nyro only through her Monterey performance, I am posting this original song of hers for your pleasure and enlightenment as to what a great performer she normally was.

    Imagine if this was from Monterey Pop? Knockout!

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    LAURA NYRO save the country (LIVE!)
    youtube.com5:07 5 years ago
    from LAURA NYRO Spread Your Wings & Fly: Fillmore East May 30 1971 - created at Animoto - Make great videos. Easily.
     
  2. qm1ceveb

    qm1ceveb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fort lauderdale
    What Beccabear says about the transition from folk to rock is very interesting. It intrigued me since I read one of Richie Unterberger's books. He is an excellent writer with impeccable taste for 60s sounds (betraying his age).

    The transition from folk to folk rock to psychedelia in the U.S. is absolutely critical for the development of the 60s rock that I love. Buffalo Springfield, Jefferson Airplane, QMS, the Byrds and many of the rest of the groups I love best, are a result of that transition. In my opinion, they absolutely expanded the more limited boundaries of folk (and blues and country), creating the most beautiful music ever heard.

    A different story is the U.K. scene. There was no such transition. Actually, there couldn't have been. Folk-rock is the early Byrds, electric S&G and the like, an American concept. Liege and Leaf by Fairport Convention, as correctly indicated by Beccabear, amalgamated British folk (very different to American folk) with electric instruments, creating something unique and beautiful. Again, very different to folk rock. Actually, Fairport had toyed with psychedelia earlier as can be heard in their eponymous debut.
     
  3. qm1ceveb

    qm1ceveb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fort lauderdale
    Thank you!
     
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  4. qm1ceveb

    qm1ceveb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fort lauderdale
    The Group with no name may have been musically inferior but I would have loved to see them at Monterey - they seem to be visually fascinating. Jules and Cyrus not exactly teen idol types and Renais a beautiful hippie.
     
  5. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    My first (and any for years really) exposure to Laura Nyro was through people covering her great songs, same with Randy Newman, Tandyn Almer and Ruthanne Friedman. It's always worth hearing the songwriter perform their own songs and there is so much to catch up on just from the '60s! Canadian group The Sugar Shoppe covered Save The Country, I think maybe they chose it for the centennial year of the country, and while they did a good job this live recording has the full life to it! I'm sorry she apparently had a bad set at Monterey in contrast to Janis' raved over turns.
     
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  6. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    It has been a bit of a problem what we should call British Folk-Rock because it is different from the established term from the U.S./Canada. Electrified Folk only fits for some of it, plus it is using rhythms different from traditional folk at times too. After 1969's Liege & Lief groups like Lindisfarne, Steeleye Span, Dando Shaft, Bread Love & Dreams and Fotheringay (briefly) expanded the tent. Pentangle with John Renbourn and Bert Jansch was more Jazz-Folk. Fairport with Judy Dyble and Ian Matthews was a bit of an attempt to have an English Jefferson Airplane (they covered some obscure west coast U.S. numbers like Emmet Rhodes' Time Will Show The Wiser and Richard & Mimi Farina's Reno, Nevada (there is a Judy Dyble version of this if I remember correctly, and I say west coast for them on that number as I believe it was written when they were living in California and Reno is a western city).

    Off topic but... I have wondered if The Blues Project's Flute Thing with the amplified, and at one point reverb drenched, flute was ever heard or an influence on Jethro Tull. :)
     
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  7. qm1ceveb

    qm1ceveb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fort lauderdale
    Those groups you mention are all very British and all good to great. They wouldn't had appealed Monterey hippies too much, with the notable exception of early Fairport who I think would have gone VERY WELL with those American covers you mention and Thompson's exceptional guitar skills. These guys loved the U.S. scene, as did The Move. Btw, interesting that Thompson's girlfriend Jeannie the Tailor was Phil Ochs's cousin and unfortunate that her life ended so young.
     
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  8. simond9x

    simond9x Active Member

    Location:
    UK
    Pentangle opened for the Dead at the Fillmore West in 1969 and, apparently, went down well. There's an article somewhere that discusses the influence they had on them, especially on Garcia.
     
  9. qm1ceveb

    qm1ceveb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fort lauderdale
    Pentangle is so great and so unique. On top of their enormous talent, their music had an extravagant quality like the Strawbs with Wakeman that could have appealed hippie audiences a couple of years earlier. The U.S. would never have been a market for them however.
     
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  10. jomo48

    jomo48 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Davis CA, USA
    Two of my three favorite bands to this day. I was at one of these shows, probably Thursday, and it just didn't get any better.
     
  11. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    I have the first Pentangle album and John Renbourn's Sir John A Lot Of Merrie Englandes Musyk Thyng on U.S. Reprise LP, pretty sure they are the original '60s pressings based on other Reprise LPs of the same time I have (Miriam Makeba, Gordon Lightfoot, Kenny Rogers & The First Edition)

    Electric Eden by Rob Young is a great (and thick) British companion to the two Richie Unterberger Folk-Rock books.

    Watched half the main Monterey feature last night and going to finish it plus extras tonight. My Dad seems to be a Janis Joplin admirer which I never realized. He liked the Simon & Garfunkel, Canned Heat and Jefferson Airplane best of what I watched with him last night. He is sort of best defined as a Johnny Cash-Waylon Jennings-CCR type of guy. He thought a friend who went hippie and had black lights and long hair etc. had 'gone crazy' back in the day, but then the friend had lost a good job because of it.
     
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  12. qm1ceveb

    qm1ceveb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fort lauderdale
    Beccabear, you should get Pentangle's third, Basket of Light. It is a masterpiece.
     
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  13. simond9x

    simond9x Active Member

    Location:
    UK
    If it was the Thursday, it didn't!
     
  14. Yayastone

    Yayastone Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Monterey, CA.
    I attended a discussion with a group of iconic photographers from the festival on thursday.
    All the backstories were really motivating and truly overwhelming.

    They were all really nice and signed a print i brought.

    Lou Adler was also there hanging in the background.
    Very polite and even signed the print.

    (This was my first time asking for an autograph since Winnie the pooh
    at disneyland.)

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  15. ianuaditis

    ianuaditis Forum Resident

    Location:
    Pemberwick, CT
    Garcia would later refer to Pentangle as striking him, from the times they’d opened for the Dead in early ’69: “There used to be a nice-sounding band with those two good English fingerpickers…Pentangle, with Bert Jansch and John Renbourn... They were great! They had a tasty jazz drummer who played brushes, and an excellent acoustic bass player, and a lady who sang in a sort of madrigal, English voice. It was a lovely band, the texture was really nice, and it sounded great onstage. We played a lot of shows with them, and we heard them a lot in certain circumstances, and they sounded beautiful. It had a lot of possibilities, that combination of two acoustic guitars and a standard rhythm section.”

    Grateful Dead Guide: Garcia's Record Collection

    Lost Live Dead: Fillmore West February 27-March 2, 1969 Grateful Dead/Pentangle/Sir Douglas Quintet

    That stand was the source for much of the material on Live/Dead.

    Also featured - the Sir Douglas Quintet
     
  16. fr in sc

    fr in sc Forum Resident

    Location:
    Hanahan, SC
    So we have to wait a thousand years for this to happen again? Cosmic, man!!!!
     
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  17. fr in sc

    fr in sc Forum Resident

    Location:
    Hanahan, SC
    Whenever I see Hendrix at Monterey playing the guitar behind his back while he's pointing at somebody (probably female) in the audience with this wow! look on his face I always bust up laughing......every single time!
     
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  18. Walter Sobchak

    Walter Sobchak Well-Known Member

    Bloomfield was never half-measured about anything
     
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  19. footlooseman

    footlooseman Forum Resident

    Location:
    at her feet

    this is one is a keeper also specially the expanded relesase

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  20. footlooseman

    footlooseman Forum Resident

    Location:
    at her feet
    repeating calendar years
    Repeating Calendar – years equal to 2017
     
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  21. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    I have everything by Pentangle on expanded CD (except the first one as I made my own CD with the LP). Even so, their opening for the Dead on a few shows and Jerry Garcia's comments about them had pretty much elduded me until this thread. Thank you for sharing about that! :love:

    Watched the rest of the main feature film tonight, thought I saw Suzy Shaw maybe in the one of the off stage shots but the hair color was light brown not dark. Just thought of Greg Shaw because of the making 'God's Eyes' scenes. And as I say I thought I recognized Robert Crumb. Lots of other artists listening to Shankar I re-noticed too.
     
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  22. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    You could use a vintage 1967 calendar this year and it would work out? I remember doing that one year with a 1920s calendar I found.
     
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  23. polchik

    polchik Well-Known Member

    YMMV …. i broke down and double dipped on the blu-ray because i frankly love how 16mm, when transferred well … looks … on blu-ray. it looks fantastic on my 42 plasma, as well as thru my projector ….. it is one of my favourite films

    Monterey Pop Blu-ray - Criterion



    the audio is another thing to consider as well, if you have the capabilities to decode it …..

    The Complete Monterey Pop Festival Blu-ray

    "…. As most of you probably already know, legendary recording engineer Eddie Kramer is responsible for the remixed audio tracks found on this Blu-ray disc. He went back to the original 8-track tapes made at the concerts by Wally Heider and ended up remastering them. The results are indeed very impressive.

    I, however, prefer to watch the film with the Original Uncompressed Stereo track. I like its organic qualities and, more importantly, the type of atmosphere it has the ability to recreate. Obviously, there is quite a bit of noise and hiss on it, but I still like it better than the other two tracks included on this disc

    The Remixed Uncompressed Stereo track addresses the two issues noted above. Jimi's solos, for example, are a lot clearer, as is Janet's singing, which is one of the key reasons why I believe that many of you would probably end up using the Remixed Uncompressed Stereo track when viewing the film.

    The Remixed DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track has been praised by a number of reviewers, but I am not a big fan of it. Yes, it is true – there are notable improvements in terms of balance, depth and dynamics. The sound is also a lot crisper when compared to the other two tracks mentioned above. But the rawness, and all the minor imperfections that are part of the film's identity, are simply missing from the DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track – and as far as I am concerned, Monterey Pop just isn't the same film without them….."
     
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  24. RiRiIII

    RiRiIII Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Many thanks for your detailed response.

    Is the blu-ray set "All Regions" or "Region 1" only encoded?

    Thanks again.
     
  25. cdb3

    cdb3 Active Member

    Location:
    Milton Keynes, UK
    Interesting comments above about folk/rock etc., but I wondered about the sharp distinction being made. My understanding has been that English, Scottish and Irish folk has been a major influence in the States, which was why the likes of Dylan and Paul Simon were in the U.K. In the early sixties. Then weren't the Beatles a big reason for the west coast folkies picking up their electric guitars? I don't think you can underestimate the extent and complexities of musical cross pollination in the sixties. Fairport Convention are an example in their early interest in the likes of Jefferson Airplane. British popular/rock was of course also permeated with American black music in the period, whether Motown or Chicago blues. But of course the most creative musicians were making something new and diverse from these various sources - adventure was in the air as can be seen at Monterey. To add another example in the light of Ravi Shankar and world music - how about the Incredible String Band and their deployment of instruments from around the World?
     
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