Adding an Equalizer

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by MegaGroove, Jul 14, 2016.

  1. ellaguru

    ellaguru Forum Resident

    Location:
    milan mich
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  2. Waxfreak

    Waxfreak Forum Resident

    And right you are man ! Been happy with my Pioneer GR-777 since 1995. Unbelievable Q and silent as a dead mouse. Nice article BTW; thanx.

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. As an experienced bass player, I can tell you with plenty of confidence that this is an EXCELLENT product by Behringer (although, in all honesty, it's the only Behringer product I've had a positive impression so far, along wih the 4x10 cabinet they used to offer as a companion for this amp):

    BX2000H | Bass Head Amplifiers | Bass | Behringer | Categories | MUSIC Group »

    It's probably not built to the highest quality standards, but what matters in the end is the performance. And this thing is truly great in that department.
     
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  4. I used to be a fan of equalizers, but age has made me appreciate the sound "as is" much more. Not the most budget-friendly approach, but I'd rather invest on a high quality flat-sounding amplifier and a set of speakers with similar characteristics. BTW, that's exactly the reason I chose the Audio-Technica ATH-M40x as my current headphones instead of the top of their ATH-M--x line. After listening to many samples on comparative reviews, I found them to be the most flat-sounding of the bunch. I'm extremely happy with them.
     
  5. Waxfreak

    Waxfreak Forum Resident

    The OP said he wanted a budget eq. The Behringer is OK (not that I'd use it in MY rig myself, mind you ) People who don't adhere to the ¨listen as the artist/engineer intended¨ don't believe you can fix recording flaws with just ¨better equipment¨. Indeed a flawed recording may sound better on better equipment, but then again it may sound worse yet. An eq won't cause ¨more harm than damage¨per se. It's the owner's lack of criteria who will abuse it and cause said harm to the sound.
     
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  6. murphythecat

    murphythecat Forum Resident

    Location:
    Canada
    I suggest to not get a equalizer but spend the money and go try different headphones. this will give you much better increase in SQ

    the hd600/hd650 are simply a steal for the money, so is akg k701.
     
    MegaGroove likes this.
  7. I have not tried the Micromega MyZic amp. I don't know what sort of sound style and presentation it is doing.

    The Schiit Magni 2 Uber can be a little bright. The brightness is what I'd attribute to solid state style hardness in the upper mids and treble. It's a common thing that happens with solid state amps, especially the lower cost ones. I also consider the Schiit Asgard and Asgard 2 to have some of that solid state hardness in the treble that can make the sound seem a little bit brighter. There are many solid state headphone amps that accentuate that solid state hardness more than the Schiit amps do. I'm not knocking the Magni and Asgard. Just pointing out that they do have some of that solid state hardness that can make them sound a bit brighter. The Asgard and Magni have good microdetail and dynamics, but at the expense of having some SS treble hardness.

    The problem with amps or source components that have that sort of solid state hardness or grain is that you cannot EQ that brighter sheen in the sound away. Because it is not a problem with the amp or source having too much treble making them bright. It's a problem with the character of the treble. And you can't fix that with EQ. You can use an EQ to lower the treble, and that hardness and sheen is still going to be there.

    The solution is to get an amp and source components that don't have that sort of treble hardness or sheen. Tubes are one way to address that. More expensive solid state designs and amps are another way. I like the tube solution. A good hybrid tube amp (a mix of tube and solid state) can fix that treble issue while keeping some of the benefits of solid state. You may want to try the Schiit Vali 2 hybrid and see if it helps. I haven't tried the Vali 2 yet, so can't say for sure if it smoothens the treble. But it likely does. The Lyr 2 would also be an option for a hybrid amp, but at much more cost. There are some other hybrids out there for reasonable cost. Like the Garage 1217 amps.

    If your headphones are lacking some bass it is possible to use EQ to add some additional bass. That's something that EQ can address. However, trying to fix treble brightness due to solid state hardness, grain, or glare is not something you can fix with EQ.

    An EQ also needs to be equal to or better than the sound quality of your source and amp. If the EQ is of lower sound quality then it will take away microdetail and soundstage space. You'll lose some of the microdetail and soundstage that your gear is otherwise capable of. Lose too much microdetail an your system will sound like mush and closed in rather than having the openness and clarity it could have. An EQ that retains microdetail and soundstage is going to be expensive.
     
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  8. The FRiNgE

    The FRiNgE Forum Resident

    Yes! very well stated.
     
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  9. Heckto35

    Heckto35 Active Member

    Yeah that's ******** at its greatest. My equalizer was very affordable and sounds excellent.
     
  10. Heckto35

    Heckto35 Active Member

    Don't listen to those guys. My Technics SH-8017 equalizer is not expensive and does no harm and all good.
     
  11. Methodical

    Methodical Active Member

    Location:
    MD
    I've used the Behringer 31 band EQ and when I removed it from the system my music sounded better. It seemed like it was taking something away. I couldn't really put my finger on it, but I could hear it. I made a post about it here. It was hard to remove it because I've always had EQs near my music (car, home etc.), but I've been without it since around spring time and have not missed it.

    Heckto35 digging the Avatar. That's my man, band - EWF.
     
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  12. ThinWhiteDuke

    ThinWhiteDuke New Member

    Location:
    New Zealand
    I have a Technics SH-GE70. Sometimes useful for reducing boomy speakers when I don't want to move them away from the wall. But when the lights are down low it sure is purdy! :D
     
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  13. Heckto35

    Heckto35 Active Member

    Lol thanks dude, love those guys too!
     
  14. Tiger-Eyes

    Tiger-Eyes New Member

    Location:
    St. Elsewhere
    The best equalizing you'd get without adding any audible distortion would be through a professional mixer like Allen & Heath. That's the quitetest most clinical natural EQ I ever used. The only thing it will affect is the low mid and high. And you can pinpoint which mid frequencies to boost or cut too using a second knob to dial in that frequency. The AH zed mixers can be had for very cheap. I'm still guessing that's not what you would like.
     
  15. It depends on the system. The EQ needs to be at the same level in sound quality as the rest of the gear. If you put that EQ in a system that has a tube preamp and tube amp you may notice that the EQ does some harm in that system.
     
  16. GuildX700

    GuildX700 Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Boy, that sure is a statement that could be torn to shreds in a moment.

    Does no harm, and all good?

    REALLY???

    If that were the case, everyone interested in great audio reproduction would have an EQ. But THEY DON'T.

    From what I've heard from folks using EQ's the last 40 years I've had the unfortunate displeasure of hearing folks systems with an EQ is they are doing far more damage to the accuracy of the signal than anything else.

    But...perhaps you have no care about accurately reproducing the original signal?

    If so go on, EQ it to death. The typical smiley face curve works best.
     
  17. Fishoutofwater

    Fishoutofwater Forum Resident

    calm down lads!! Each to their own. I love my DSP and it is able to target specific frequencies which react badly due to room issues. Have a look at Black Sea Audio. Karl explains things better than i can
     
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  18. Methodical

    Methodical Active Member

    Location:
    MD
    Care to provide a link. I think that might entice folks to maybe check it out verses them having to search for something they already don't buy into.

    Thanks...
     
  19. Fishoutofwater

    Fishoutofwater Forum Resident

    Sorry; no idea how to "link". I am a Dinosaur when it comes to using computers!
     
  20. moops

    moops Forum Resident

    Location:
    Geebung, Australia
    33na3rd likes this.
  21. Tiger-Eyes

    Tiger-Eyes New Member

    Location:
    St. Elsewhere
    Would it be able to target problem frequencies?

    I thought there were two types of equalization. The most common would affect nearing frequencies with a long slope. The other is able to dial in and cut frquencies more precise leaving nearby frequencies more or less as they were.
     
  22. Lonson

    Lonson Don't get around much anymore

    Location:
    Chardon, Ohio
    I'm lucky in that I have great tone controls on my amp (that are not in the signal path itself so not degrading in the way some can be) but I've also been intrigued with this new product from Decware and have one on order:

    DECWARE Vacuum tube Bass restoration EQ

    I've had great success with Decware products in the past, and I have some nice 12AU7s to try in this (including excellent Amperex 6085) and am looking forward to playing around with this (probably have it around Thanksgiving).
     
  23. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    listen flat therefore rarely need an eq...
     
  24. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    years ago I blew out my tweets with my "new EQ"...learned MY LESSON WELL.
     
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  25. bluemooze

    bluemooze Forum Resident

    Location:
    Frenchtown NJ USA
    :edthumbs:
     
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