Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    Yuri Bashmet
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Andre Previn
    Walton: Concerto for Viola
    Bruch: Concerto for Violin & Viola; Romance for Viola; Kol Nidrei
    Neeme Jarvi
    RCA, 1998
    the Walton recorded in 1994
    [​IMG]
     
  2. George P

    George P Give Me Your Sweet Soul Dream Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    With Szell conducting, I bet it's great!
     
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  3. Scope J

    Scope J Forum Resident

    Location:
    Michigan
  4. scompton

    scompton Forum Resident

    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I have some of his recordings in Dacapo of 20th century Scandinavian composers that are all great. The Berwald symphonies and Zemlinsky albums on Chandos are good. I have some of the Opening Doors series on BIS. They’re chamber orchestra performances of romantic symphonies. They’re a mixed bag. In general, the later the composition, the less I like it.
     
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  5. George P

    George P Give Me Your Sweet Soul Dream Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    From the above box set, now enjoying wind quintets by Mozart and Beethoven, as played by Serkin and the Philadelphia Woodwind Quintet recorded in 1953.
     
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  6. andolink

    andolink Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    music by Cooke, Matteo da Perugia, Machaut and Anon.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Scope J

    Scope J Forum Resident

    Location:
    Michigan
    np:
    [​IMG]
     
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  8. andolink

    andolink Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Chaya Czernowin: the quiet, for large orchestra divided into 3 groups (the crescendo trilogy part I); zohar iver (blind radiance), for ensemble and orchestra divided into 3 groups (the crescendo trilogy part II); esh, for orchestra with countertenor (the crescendo trilogy part III)
    Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks/Brad Lubman
    Ensemble Nikel
    Berner Symphonieorchester/Mario Venzago
    Kai Wessel, countertenor
    Philharmonisches Orchester Cottbus/Evan Christ

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Scope J

    Scope J Forum Resident

    Location:
    Michigan
  10. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    I am looking forward to listening to these 3 boxes which arrived today.

    [​IMG]
    Pro Arte Quartet
    Haydn: 29 String Quartets
    recorded for His Master's Voice in London before the war interrupted the series.
    Warner, 2017
    7CD


    [​IMG]
    Paul Badura-Skoda
    Schubert: the Complete Piano Sonatas
    RCA, 2017
    from 1971
    12CD

    [​IMG]
    Nicholas Angelich
    Brahms: Piano Works, Piano Concertos, Chamber Music
    Erato, 2017
    10 CD
    recorded 2003-2009
     
  11. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    By coincidence, these are my current "transfer" project from my own 78s. The records, or at least a good part of them, like those of Schnabel's Beethoven, were "society" issues--sort of a granddaddy of crowdfunding, the system being that through advertising a group of interested buyers would be assembled from the general public to pre-subscribe to the issues as members of a "Society" (the Hugo Wolf Society, the Beethoven Society, the Sibelius Society, what have you), with the proceeds funding production of the recordings by HMV. In return, subscribers got at least theoretically exclusive rights to receive the first two volumes of the series, although I think in some cases later buyers could obtain them by paying a big premium. The Haydn Quartet Society sponsored several seven-record albums, generally with four but sometimes with five quartets in each; the series eventually ran to eight in total, although I'm not sure but what by the end the Society system may have been dropped in favor of regular funding by the record company. In the United States, Victor issued something like five or six of them, but not, of course, society volumes I and II.

    My progress is that I've copied all the records at this point and edited the first two quartets represented, op. 1 nos. 1 and 6. I must say, in listening to the records as I copied them, I've become very fond of the Pro Arte group's way with this music. Irving Kolodin found fault with the technique of first violinist and quartet founder Alphonse Onnou in certain fast passages, and once my attention was directed to it I could hear what he meant, but it really doesn't bother me much. Overall, these are warm, loving accounts that convey a sense of rightness, of joy within an ordered framework. That's not to say that they lack for vigor--far from it--but just that the Pro Arte group is intensely musical, tempering the vigor with lovely, rounded playing that lets Haydn speak with his uniquely sane, satisfying voice. Note that the players were Belgians and reflected the old Belgian school of string playing, nowadays largely supplanted by the rather more aggressive Russian school that even then was in the ascendancy. [Edit] Note too, HIPsters need not apply, or at least had better be ready to suspend any insistence on "historically correct" performance practice. The Pro Arte group makes music, not academic points.

    If you find that you like the Pro Arte's sound, I'd recommend chasing down a copy of their recording of the fist Brahms string sextet (with added players Alfred Hobday and Anthony Pini). Deeply beautiful playing in the Romantic mold, again more or less a thing of the past today.
     
  12. You make a very strong case for checking out these recordings! :)
     
  13. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    Thanks for all of the information on the Pro Arte Quartet. I have only listened to the first disc, but I do like their playing so far. The credits say "New remastering from the best sources available by Christophe Henault at Art & Son Studio, Annecy." I am sure there must be a lot of processing to lower the noise floor to this level, but I am still glad to hear their art.
    "Recorded 1939-1938."
    Some excerpts from the notes:
    "as for their interpretation of Stravinsky, Ernest Ansermet has given an account of their first meeting with the composer: 'One day some young musicians asked Stravinsky if he would be willing to give his opinion of the interpretation of his two string quartets that they had prepared. It is unusual for executants, especially the uninitiated, to be successful at a first attempt. Accustomed to tiresome lack of comprehension, Stravinsky, as a first step, asked his visitors to listen to the pianola transcriptions of his works. After this, modest and a little intimidated, they took up their instruments. From the very first note the composer was won over, and at the end of their performance, greatly moved, all he could do was to exclaim: "I have nothing to say! It was perfect! I have never heard my music interpreted with such truth."
    ...
    At Cambridge they played, between 1925 and 1938, a complete Beethoven cycle on more than one occasion, much Haydn and Mozart, and a series of historical recitals which included works by Vivaldi, Schubert, Brahms, Borodin and the moderns.
    ...
    At one of their recitals in an English provincial town in 1932 they played Bartok's Fourth Quartet (which was dedicated to them), and a fresh start had to be made because the audience did not realize that the tuning up had ended and the music had begun.
    ...
    Their records were made in the London studios of His Master's Voice between 1931 and 1938. [No. 3 Studio Abbey Road]. It was intended that they should record all of Haydn's quartets but the outbreak of war put an end to the plan. The Pro Arte Quartet's devotion to Haydn did not, incidentally, originate with the recording project, for they had played the complete cycle in Brussels, Antwerp and probably elsewhere, some years before 1931.
    ...
    David Bicknell, who was Head of the International Artist's Department of His Master's Voice and the producer of most of the Pro Arte Quartet's records, speaks of their evident passion for chamber music. He relates how, after a grueling six-hour recording session, Onnou and the others put their instruments into their cases, got into their coats, and everybody was ready to go home. The conversation turned to Bartok and, when the Pro Arte realized that nobody in the studio was familiar with his quartets, they got out their instruments, took off their coats, and played right through the First Quartet."

    The quartet was established in 1912/1913.
    [​IMG]
     
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  14. George P

    George P Give Me Your Sweet Soul Dream Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    FWIW, I find Art & Son to do exemplary work.
     
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  15. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    Good to know. So far, I find the sound very agreeable to listen to.

    There is a typo in my longer post above. It should say the quartets were recorded between 1931 and 1938.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
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  16. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    All extremely interesting stuff--thanks for taking the time and trouble to post it!

    And in mine. The albums had three or four quartets, not four and sometimes five. Chalk it up to bleary-eyed "need to get to bed" posting. ;)

    One more fun fact: Robert Maas had a brother, Marcel Maas, who was a well respected pianist and also made records. I have a few, all Bach (one of the solo keyboard toccatas, several sonatas for violin and keyboard). Where Robert and his Pro Arte friends recorded for HMV, Marcel was a Columbia artist.
     
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  17. RiRiIII

    RiRiIII Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, Greece
  18. RiRiIII

    RiRiIII Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. George P

    George P Give Me Your Sweet Soul Dream Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Seconded!

    Let's keep these fun facts about classical music coming! Sharing them is one reason I started this thread 9 years ago!

    Now listening to the Beethoven Cello Sonatas, as performed by Casals and Serkin from the big Serkin box:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. George P

    George P Give Me Your Sweet Soul Dream Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2017
  21. George P

    George P Give Me Your Sweet Soul Dream Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Speaking of Beethoven, now enjoying this 1954 performance of Beethoven's first piano concerto, in mono sound, from The Complete Columbia Album Collection.
     
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  22. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I gather descriptive text is to follow eventually. Will be interested to see what he says about the Georgescu cycle. [Edit] I note he is defining "cycle" broadly, as a number of entries were never conceived as a unified entity. Weingartner, for instance, in that light recorded the first "complete cycle," but his recordings were made with different orchestras over a period of maybe a couple of decades, and in a number of cases he made more than one recording of the same work. He recorded no. 9 twice, for example, one in 1926 in London with soloists and chorus singing in English (which has the distinction of being the first complete electrical recording of the work, beating out Albert Coates's HMV recording by a few months), the other the celebrated one from the '30s sung in German.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017
  23. Baroque

    Baroque Active Member

    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Lots of great releases on the L'Oiseau-Lyre label. This is the one I'm enjoying tonight - Telemann played by The Academy of Ancient Music, Hogwood, dir.[​IMG]
     
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  24. bruce2

    bruce2 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Connecticut, USA
    I have been listening to Mahler symphonies lately. The version of No. 5 I own is by James Levine and the Philadelphia Orchestra on RCA. The last couple times I listened to it I wasn't pleased with the sound quality, so I just ordered the live recording by Solti and the Chicago Symphony from 1991 on Decca. Is anyone familiar with this Solti recording of Mahler Symphony No. 5 and can give me your opinion on the sound and performance?
     
  25. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    Mikhail Pletnev
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Libor Pesek

    Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rhapsody...

    Virgin Classics, 1988
    [​IMG]
     

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