Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. Matt Richardson

    Matt Richardson Forum Resident

    Location:
    60302
    I would doubt if there's anything I bought that you can't find on CD, so nothing super noteworthy to speak of. Nevertheless, the real treasure is the analogue sound. That's the reason that I buy vinyl.

    I respect my CD collection, but I love my records.
     
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  2. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying a second listen to this CD. Man, these guys generate some incredible tension!
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
  3. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Old records never cease to be full of surprises. As I wait for an oil change for my car, I'm editing my dub of the Julius Pruwer Les Huguenots overture recording that I mentioned a couple of days ago, and comparing it to the accounts on YouTube quickly revealed it contains a lot more music than they do. Did a bit of digging, and come to find out the wily conductor, faced with a piece running around 5 minutes and record sides of 4 minutes each, interpolated the music from an Act I chorus ("Bonheur de la table") to flesh the thing out. Well, who can complain (aside from purists, that is)? More music, and played with enthusiasm if not, perhaps, the last word in polish. Meyerbeer, the consummate man of the theater, undoubtedly would approve.

    Oh, Pruwer also adds a chord to resolve the music at the end of side 1. I've removed it from my final copy. Never a dull moment...

    [Edit] Hmm. Looking into things a bit further, I find that according to my favorite online resource, Wikipedia, the encyclopedia anyone can edit, "A short orchestral prelude, featuring the Lutheran chorale Ein feste Burg, replaces the extended overture Meyerbeer originally intended for the opera." I wonder if what Pruwer recorded was the extended, discarded score?
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018
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  4. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Enjoying this lovely CD. So glad I picked up all the Bach CDs from this collection in my earlier days of collecting.
     
  5. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    :edthumbs:

    In addition to Columbia's US release, I have the German-issue LP of that recording from 1977:

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    The covers were so much nicer back in the day, eh?
     
  7. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Usually... but, of course, it's the music that counts. ;) I think a nice cover can help sell an album to someone who might be on the fence about buying it.
     
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  8. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Like this one?

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    ;)
     
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  9. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying this oldie but goodie.
     
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  10. ToddBD

    ToddBD Forum Resident

    Enjoying both of these symphonies tonight, Karajan's 60's cycle...one of the best "budget buys" I ever made.
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. winders

    winders Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San Martin, CA
    I am listening to my favorite symphony conducted by Reiner:

     
  12. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    A wonderful disc indeed!
     
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  13. winders

    winders Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San Martin, CA
    Now I am listening to my favorite versions of Beethoven's 5th and 7th symphonies:

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  14. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Last night I pulled out and dubbed Columbia set no. 88, Schubert's Sym. no. 9 performed by the Halle Or. under its then music director Sir Hamilton Harty, recorded in January 1928 as part of a big commemoration of Schubert's death centennial the company had launched as a promotional ploy.

    Prior owners left inscriptions inside the front cover that give a good, if possibly not complete, idea of the set's history. First is the notation "Herbert & Evelyn Lyser December 1938." Several of the records bear neatly written paper labels, taped on, reading "Lyser." Then there's a return address sticker, "David Prudhomme, 808 McClatchy Way, Sacramento 18, California" and the following notation: "This rare Centennial album found in the Salvation Army Store, Marysville, California, 20 November 1962. Despite the age of the recording, a glorious performance and interpretation!"

    Some years later, Mr. Prudhomme added the following: "The more we hear this recording, the more we realize how truly great it is. It is amazing that such beauty is captured in a feat of electronic engineering that was accomplished 42 years ago! The genius of Harty and the agility of his orchestra had a great deal to do with this. --DP April, 1969"

    I bought the set on eBay from one of the more established 78 dealers about a year ago. If no other owner failed to mark his acquisition on the cover, excluding resellers that would make me the set's third in a span of 80 years.

    Oh, and that bit about "42 years ago"? Now it's 90, and the set has traveled from the West to the East Coast. The set *is* unusually vivid, and my copy plays unusually cleanly with a 2.8 mil truncated elliptical stylus; hats off to the recording engineers. Happily it avoids the "speed creep" problem common to English Columbia recordings of its era, which infected the last Harty recording I transferred (that one was Beethoven's 4th Sym., recorded pursuant to a similar Columbia anniversary commemorative project). As to the performance, well, to modern ears it sounds a bit odd, with winds more colorful than we're accustomed to hearing and very much to the fore, and lots of portamento, particularly in the cellos. More than that I probably shouldn't say on first acquaintance. I can add, though, that it made for an uncommonly entertaining evening.
     
  15. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    I'm glad to see this "oldie" made it to CD, as I've always had a fondness for this set--my first recordings of the Beethoven Piano & Violin Sonatas.

    It's hard for me to believe it, but 47 years ago I bought the (now-well-worn) album below...

    [​IMG]

    I can still recall buying it in the record shop after talking about it with the store owner -- a nice, older gentleman who was an accomplished pianist and really knew classical music. Those were the days... compared to the impersonal, forgettable mouse-clicks we do today to buy music.
    Anyway, I enjoyed the three sonatas on this album so much that I later bought the complete 4-LP set (below).

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    I got this set from Japan a few years ago:


    [​IMG]
     
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  17. hvbias

    hvbias Forum Resident

    Location:
    Northeast
    Chopin's Preludes played by Moiseiwitsch. These are really magnificent, I appreciate them more every time I play them. Thanks to George P for tipping me off to them :tiphat: I'm glad he recorded them all, often not the case of artists in the 78 era which to be honest drives me mad sometimes when I hear them perform some of the shorter pieces very well.

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    My pleasure!

    So many goodies in that Naxos Historical series. His Chopin Ballades and his Schumann Kinderszenen are highlights for me.
     
  19. hvbias

    hvbias Forum Resident

    Location:
    Northeast
    Oh yes I ended up buying all his ones with solo piano after hearing the Ballades :) These Preludes aren't as memorable mostly because of the brisk tempi in some pieces, but as a whole still very enjoyable. Moiseiwitsch along with Schnabel's Beethoven discs are hands down my favorites of the all the piano discs by Naxos Historical.
     
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  20. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Mine too. The Ignaz Friedman CDs aint too shabby neither. And Prokofiev Plays Prokofiev.
     
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  21. hvbias

    hvbias Forum Resident

    Location:
    Northeast
    I do like the Friedman disc with Songs Without Words, picking up more of them are on my list next time MDT has another sale. Moiseiwitsch just grabbed me, it's like being in a trance when I listen to him and I like that he rarely goes too far with the rubato. Rachmaninoff playing his music are also special.
     
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  22. ToddBD

    ToddBD Forum Resident

    Another Musikfest from my library, thoroughly festive and enjoyable "big band" Haydn.
    [​IMG]
     
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  23. hvbias

    hvbias Forum Resident

    Location:
    Northeast
    I ordered this based of Hank Drake's review. This is the lowest price it has come up before on Amazon and I am not going to risk it going out of print like many of those smaller Sony sets!

    [​IMG]
     
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  24. George P

    George P Love Will Lead Us Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Love the Drake!
     
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  25. BlueNoteFan

    BlueNoteFan Active Member

    Location:
    Texas
    Right on! The Bavarian Radio Symphony pretty much owns Mahler 1 for me. My favorite recordings in no particular order are Kubelik (DG), Kubelik (Audite), and Nezet-Seguin - all with the wonderful BRSO.
     
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