Different Vocal From the Original Record That Is Better (Vocally)*

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by MortSahlFan, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. MortSahlFan

    MortSahlFan Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    US
    That is BETTER (vocally).. Examples...

    Young Lust (which I think is much better than the studio version, especially with the added rap)


    The live version of "Run Like Hell".. Instead of Roger singing each part alternating between the R and L stereo, I liked it much better in concert when Roger and David would sing a couplet each... It sounds more fitting to the darkness of the song, sounds more confrontational... "Grandchester Meadows", too. I think the latter song was because of the "Ummagumma" spirit of half of it being live, and then half of it being only one member.

    Run Like Hell
    Pink Floyd - Run Like Hell (Live)

    Grantchester Meadows
    Pink Floyd - Grantchester Meadows Live KQED 1970 |Full HD|
     
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  2. DBMartin

    DBMartin Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Deurne
    Probably controversial, but I prefer Kate Bush's re-recording of Wuthering Heights. It's a little less excentric (vocally) than the original, and the 80s production might scare some people, but it's beautifully sung and the brilliant guitar solo at the end is much more audible:

     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
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  3. MortSahlFan

    MortSahlFan Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    US
    Thanks for this version, never heard it before, I like it... Her voice isn't as high of course, that's aging I guess. I remember when I first heard the song, it was stuck in my head for 2 days - couldn't even sleep without re-living the chorus. Was that David Gilmour playing the solo?
     
  4. Motown Junk

    Motown Junk Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Wales, UK
    I've always preferred the alternative mix of 'All Tomorrow's Parties' which features on the West German CD of the Velvet Underground & Nico. Instead of Nico's double track vocals which appear on the original (and most other releases), it just has a single track version of Nico's vocals.

     
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  5. DBMartin

    DBMartin Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Deurne
    It's actually in the exact same vocal range as the original version, only this time Kate adds even higher notes at the end of the song (the sung/screamy note during the solo). Her voice sounds deeper and more mature though, which might lead people to believe that she's singing lower. I'm not sure who played that solo, but I don't believe it was Gilmour. He did sort of discover Kate and saw her musical artistic potential, if I recall correctly...
     
  6. MortSahlFan

    MortSahlFan Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    US
    Yes exactly - same register, just biological. She said in an interview that there are disadvantages, not being able to sing some things she used to do, but adding that a deeper voice could enable her to do more.. Take the song, "Babooshka" - still has "it"
     
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  7. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    There were a couple of vocals for Where Were You When I Needed You by the Grass Roots.
     
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  8. MikeM

    MikeM Forum Resident

    Location:
    Youngstown, Ohio
    This has always been cause of a great deal of confusion.

    The hit single I believe features vocals by Bill Fulton of a San Francisco band (The Bedouins? I'm not remembering for sure). There is rumored to be a demo version with P.F. Sloan singing lead, but I'm not sure that has ever been released. (There's a version on a 90s-vintage album credited to Sloan, but I think it's the single version with Fulton.)

    Of course, when the "real" Grass Roots were formed, the song was re-recorded with Rob Grill singing the lead. This version is rather dreadful IMHO, yet it's the one most Oldies stations play today.
     
  9. MikeM

    MikeM Forum Resident

    Location:
    Youngstown, Ohio
    The Gene Clark LP Early L.A. Sessions features new vocals by Gene laid over the remixed original instrumental tracks of the Gene Clark with the Gosdin Brothers album.

    I don't think the Early L.A. album has ever been reissued on CD. It's not necessarily better than the original, but I'm glad it exists as sort of an alternate universe take on these great songs.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. urasam2

    urasam2 A Famous Potato

    It's an excellent version, and I probably would have picked it as my favourite when it came out, but she sings sharp on the "Ca" of "Cathy" at 2:31, and that completely spoils it for me, I wince every time I hear it. Otherwise, brilliant though
     
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  11. Mai Tem Baht

    Mai Tem Baht Forum Resident

    Location:
    Phuket
    She's not singing sharp. She’s deliberately changed the melody slightly. That’s all.

    I can understand why you don’t like it if you’re used to the original.
     
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  12. smallworld

    smallworld Forum Resident

    I prefer Kirsty MacColl's vocal on the "Truck Stop" version of her song "There's a Guy Works Down the Chip Shop Swears He's Elvis". It's more plaintive and has less of the twang she affected for the "Chip Shop" ballad version. I also love the lyric change from "Hicksville, Tennessee" to "Hicksville, Shepherd's Bush".

     
  13. smallworld

    smallworld Forum Resident

    The original ballad vocal:
     
  14. DBMartin

    DBMartin Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Deurne
    It's an interesting note she hits there, on the original version it was a G#3, while on this version it sounds more like a fryish G#2 (probably the lowest studio note she's ever hit).
     
  15. PretzelLogic

    PretzelLogic Machine wrapped in butter.

    Location:
    London, England
    The single-track one is what I heard first, and I still refuse to believe that the ‘a-and what costume’ bit on the double-tracked version isn’t a mastering error. It’s not in the single-track version so it was definitely added after the fact…
     
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  16. themarkster

    themarkster Active Member

    Location:
    London
    It was released on CD 4 years ago as bonus tracks on a mini LP version of the With the Gosdin Brothers album. I hear it sounds very good.

    For some reason, Brett Anderson of Suede re-recorded the vocals of Trash for the Singles comp in 2003. I think it just sounds weird...
     
  17. MikeM

    MikeM Forum Resident

    Location:
    Youngstown, Ohio
    Thanks for this info. I wasn't aware of this; will check it out.
     
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  18. Jimmy B.

    Jimmy B. Forum Resident

    I like the one with P.F. Sloan singing lead vocals; I guess that would be the original, actually.
     
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  19. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I've always distinguished them by the way the second word "I" is pronounced in the line, "the love I once felt, I don't feel any more for you". The original is more "ah", the re-do more like the vowel in the word "at". I prefer the original, however picky that may be ...
     
  20. carrick doone

    carrick doone Forum Resident

    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    What's the background on this re-recording? What caused her to redo it and what time frame does it come from- early 80s or later? EDIT: never mind. It appears to be for her greatest hits set from the mid 80s.
     
  21. Danby Delight

    Danby Delight Forum Resident

    Location:
    Boston
    Just so. When she released her best-of in 1986, she re-recorded the vocals on "Wuthering Heights" just because she felt she could do a better job on them. I think she did.
     
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  22. carrick doone

    carrick doone Forum Resident

    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    I do too and like so many I loved the original.
     
  23. hutlock

    hutlock Forum Resident

    Location:
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Just posted in another thread about this actually: XTC's "Respectable Street" has different lyrics on the single version and so a re-recorded vocal track. While I prefer the original uncensored lyrics, I think Andy Partridge does a really great job on the alternate single version in the third verse where he changes up the melody a bit. One of things that really caught my attention when I first heard it, only being familiar with the LP version.
     
  24. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    There are plenty of examples from the world of Christmas music.

    Bing Crosby's 1947 version of "White Christmas," which is the one most frequently heard today, is better than the 1942 original release.

    Nat King Cole's "The Christmas Song" had three released versions during Cole's lifetime. I prefer the 1953 version conducted by Nelson Riddle, which was the second released version, over the 1946 King Cole Trio version and the 1961 re-recording conducted by Ralph Carmichael. Nat's vocals are smoother than on the '46 version, not to mention he no longer sings "to see if reindeers really know how to fly," and his voice still has a youthful feel missing from the '61 rendition, where you can hear the effects of his life-long cigarette habit.

    Perry Como did "There Is No Christmas Like a Home Christmas" in 1950 and 1968, and I prefer the 1968 version. It's a better arrangement that feels more fully realized.

    In non-Christmas music, I prefer the re-recorded vocal on the single version of "I Am a Rock" by Simon & Garfunkel.
     
  25. MikeM

    MikeM Forum Resident

    Location:
    Youngstown, Ohio
    IIRC, the album and single versions of "Fakin' It" also differ. Seems to me there are some extra measures in one not present in the other. Do you know if these are entirely separate recordings with differing vocals, or is one just a remix of the other?
     

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