EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. John22

    John22 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Northern Germany
    Our thread starter could begin to add a link to the next #1 and all the following #1 as it would be for the current #1 song "Hang On Sloopy":

    Billboard Hot 100 Chart 10/02/1965

    So anyone who is interested could see what happened behind the current #1. With "<" or ">" next to the date of the Hot 100 you can switch to another date nearby.
     
  2. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    It's like a Beatles biography that only includes Beatles music.
    It keeps the topic out of context.
    Adding some other songs (say, the Summer of Love era or the Kennedy assassination mood) of the times helps show where music was and how The Beatles' songs factored in the deal.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  3. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    3 years wasn't really that much time.
    If a teenager was 18 in 1962, he/she may well remember Buddy Holly, if they began listening to the radio @ 14.
    If a teenager was 15 in 1962.... maybe not.
     
  4. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    Perhaps, somehow, people thought the thread would move on to rock bands or something. The thing with that is #1 songs have always been more pop than rock.

    The British Invasion lost a lot of its momentum by mid-1966. It's like the U.K. gave American artists a swift kick in the ass to get them moving. 1966 saw a barrage of U.S. garage bands who had one or two-hits.

    On the other hand, the OP has also been discussing and posting videos of non-#1 singles.

    And, about the multi-quote feature: sometimes I forget to use it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  5. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    Agree.
    The Beach Boys, who were experiencing success in 1963 and early 1964, actually became MORE successful after The Beatles.
    The Beatles were doing what Brian Wilson (and earlier, Buddy Holly) had been doing: writing and recording their own material.
    Many falsely claim The Beatles started that, when Brian Wilson, on his own, without the help of his brothers, studio musicians or others, wrote, produced and recorded Surfer Girl (1963) by himself.
     
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  6. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    Agreed! Not only did they (don't forget Dave Clark, Gene Chandler, and others) encourage artists to write their own stuff, But The Beatles helped to fundamentally change the way records were recorded, working at any hour of the day or night, mixing and producing themselves. And, it encouraged the major labels to move to rock music.

    I think that many people thought this thread would turn into a Beatles-fest, where they would dominate the discussion. Hint. Hint.;)
     
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  7. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    I prefer the "mid career" era, 1963-1967, which include Walk Like a Man, Dawn, Rag Doll, etc.
    Great songs.

    You need to see Jersey Boys.
    These guys literally were a drag-themselves-up-from-their-bootstraps act.
    Success did not come easy for them.
    The Four Seasons began in 1955. It took them 7 YEARS before they had their first hit (Sherry in 1962).
     
    Hey Vinyl Man likes this.
  8. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    Hey Paula was big then and big on oldies radio, like the Skeeter Davis song.
    It's a great song with a positive (yet subtle) "waiting" message directed at teens.
     
  9. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    What a rocker!!
    This would've stacked up well against The Fab Four (from the "other" Fab Four).
    The song starts with those homicidal drums. It has real attitude.
    A "men going their own way" type of song.

    If you don't know what MGTOW is, google it. Let's just say it ain't about cow-towing to women, being weak, not standing up to them, etc.
     
  10. Frank

    Frank Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philly, PA
  11. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    Hey... that's the year I was born... March 1962.
     
  12. Dougd

    Dougd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fla.
    It doesn't really hold up well. Sounds very dated.
    My wife hates it whenever it comes on and insists I change the XM channel.
     
    sunspot42 likes this.
  13. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Next up is "Yesterday" by The Beatles, #1 from October 9 - November 5, 1965.

     
  14. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    One of the most recorded songs in history... 1600 cover version have been recorded. Let THAT sink in for a minute. I think it's one of their best, and one as a non- Beatle fan, I never turn off when it comes on. This just happens to be my favorite cover version of it ( made into a medley with another Beatles hit)
     
  15. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Christ Almighty, what a chart! A few duds scattered here and there at the top of the charts in 1965, but even most of the lighter pop hits are legendary, memorable classics of the era ("Downtown", etc.), and then you have cuts like "Yesterday".
     
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  16. Damiano54

    Damiano54 Forum Resident

    "Yesterday" is another admirable record like "Eve of Destruction" that I never find myself wanting to play.
    The former because of overplay and the latter probably because I view it as a protest song. Never liked
    those kind, though I used to listen closely to the lyrics of Eve when it came out. But certainly there's much to admire about both songs.
     
  17. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    The again, actual sixties stewardesses sometimes dressed pretty groovy themselves.

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Frank

    Frank Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philly, PA
    Are we allowed to talk about the current song being discussed? :p

    It's OK, anyway, because there's not much to say about Yesterday that isn't cliched at this point. It is probably the singular masterpiece of the pop era. 1600 other artists have tried and failed to match or surpass the magic captured on that tape, including Paul McCartney himself. No one has come close.

    Never fully understood the song until I heard the original mono mix. It's the only one that captures the desolation and despair.
     
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  19. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    I only know the Ramsey Lewis Trio from the In Crowd, although if, as I suspect, their version of Hang On Sloopy is the one I liked... Well, then I knew that one, too!
     
    Grant likes this.
  20. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    Scrambled Eggs... Oh my baby, how I love your legs...

    It's hard to know how to approach Yesterday, the most covered song in recording history. The above excerpt shows the placeholder lyrics Paul McCartney used to remember the tune after he first composed it. Paul rolled out of bed one morning with the tune humming through his head. He sat at the piano, picked out the chords, and ... well, he couldn't believe he had written it. It had come too easily. He spent the next several months driving his friends crazy playing it, asking them what song it actually was. No one could identify it. Paul had written it in his sleep, a literal gift from the muses.

    The song was released as a single in the States, but not in the UK. Paul felt the home country would not appreciate the Beatles releasing a ballad as a single. He had no control over what Capitol did in the US, so they released it and it became massive.

    In some ways, I consider Yesterday to be the very first crack in the Beatles' group unity. It wasn't as divisive as Yoko Ono or Allen Klein, but it had its own small effect. Here's my theory. Up until this point, John Lennon had been the leader of the group. Yes, Paul was incredibly important, but John had started the group, he had composed many of their great hits, and he was generally viewed as the top dog. Then, Paul writes a song which turns into a juggernaut. The first few times they performed it, Paul went solo on stage, no other Beatles. Paul was the only Beatle on the recording. The powers that be even considered releasing it as a Paul solo number, although it was eventually credited to Lennon-McCartney (John had nothing to do with it).

    Did it bug John? You bet it did. Even after the Beatles broke up, Lennon still talked about that song. In his scathing attack on Paul, How Do You Sleep (from 1971), John throws in this wicked barb, comparing Yesterday with a more recent (and in most eyes less successful) 'Day' song:

    The only thing you done was Yesterday,
    And since you've gone you're just Another Day...

    On a talk show, John imagined being dragged on stage at 60 and being given an award for Yesterday, when he didn't even write it. He also told a story once about being in a restaurant with Yoko when a violinist came to their table and performed Yesterday. It was awkward, he said, but he understood it; after all, the guy couldn't very well have played I Am the Walrus, right?

    The song was so popular that the Beatles even succumbed and added it to their setlist in 1966, in an electric arrangement. If they had kept touring, it would have been interesting to see how many of their other 'unplayable' hits from Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, et. al., they might have tried to reproduce on stage like this.



    By the way, I love the song. Beautiful, haunting, and endlessly open to reinterpretation. One of their many all time greats.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  21. EdogawaRampo

    EdogawaRampo Forum Resident

    Jan & Dean's most successful year was 1964 and Dean Torrence once said they didn't resent The Beatles' success at all -- it seemed to 'lift all boats' he said.
     
  22. EdogawaRampo

    EdogawaRampo Forum Resident

    I got burnt out on Yesterday a very, very long time ago. It's nice, but for my money Lennon bettered it a bit later with In My Life. I still listen to McGuire's Eve Of Destruction LP now and then -- the mono press. I really like it. Yes, Eve Of Destruction is a protest song (written by a 19 year old P.F. Sloan in late 1964), but I really like McGuire's gruff, gravely voice on Sloan's protest tunes of which there are several on the Lp. You can hear the frustration.
     
  23. pickwick33

    pickwick33 Forum Resident

    But it's not unheard of, either.
     
  24. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    "Thank you, Ringo, that was wonderful." LOL.

    I love how the fans want to scream so badly, but they can't do it. Even they can't interrupt this amazing song like that (not to mention it is NOT a song that lends itself to craziness).
     
  25. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Yesterday is most likely the song that softened the hearts of older Beatles naysayers who looked down their collective noses at the boys in that first year or so of their dominance. Sure, they had other ballads like And I Love Her and If I Fell but that stark string accompaniment coupled with McCartney's plaintive vocal really seemed to touch the general public in a way the group hadn't managed and gave them "serious" cred. Shockingly, it was never released as a single in their homeland until the 70s. These days, though I regard it well enough, it's not a go to Beatles song for me.
     
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