EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    I was gonna offer up the same explanation but decided I shouldn't presume to know what you mean. More proof that the written word can be interpreted in many ways.
     
  2. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Well, these are important distinctions there . . .
     
  3. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Yes... please wait for me to introduce each song. At the very first I thought maybe every day, but people didn't have enough time to chime in and it made things confusing, I played around with different inetervals...but I eventually settled on every 48 hours.
     
    John54 likes this.
  4. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Well . . . on the "jump-ups" in question I've had my say, I'll let others chime in once you get onto them, then let it flow accordingly . . .
     
    Skywheel and alphanguy like this.
  5. Cheevyjames

    Cheevyjames Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham, NC
    Grazing in the Grass - I'd never heard this song before this thread. It's a pleasant song, but doesn't hit me anywhere near as hard as Mrs. Robinson from the month before. Jumpin' Jack Flash was the #1 in Cashbox for the week of July 20th. JJF only peaked at #3 in Billboard this same week, which is a shame since it's such an electrifying song. I wasn't around in 1968...maybe the more pleasant "Grazing in the Grass" and "This Guy's in Love With You" were so popular because the reality of the world at that time was pretty chaotic?
     
    sunspot42 likes this.
  6. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I do like the somewhat laid-back Grazing in the Grass by Hugh Masakela, although I'm not too fussy about the Friends of Distinction vocalized version, with it's cartoonish "sock it to me" refrain. I'm not sure what was the first song with "sock it to me" in the lyrics, that or Coney Island Sally by the Fifth Estate, which used to be on YouTube a couple of years ago but has flown the coop, as some songs do.
     
  7. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    I have a lot of fondness for "Grazing in the grass," especially the Friends of Distinction version. My mom bought the album and it got played a lot (and loudly) in our house. I remember liking all of it. Yes, I can dig it.

    I like the Hugh Masakela version. It's kinda slow and it has an odd drum beat (if you listen to it closely - it's in the left channel - it's not a straight on 4/4 with the snare on the 2 and 4 beats, the second snare is a beat ahead with a quick hi-hat following it on the 4. This gives it a much different feel than the fast and funky Friends' version. One thing that bother me on the Hugh Masakela recording is the main trumpet really sounds flat to me.

    I still like it. I'm very surprised it made it to number 1. I would have guessed somewhere in the top 20.
     
    SomeCallMeTim likes this.
  8. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    If it was the Fifth Estate number, you obviously haven't accounted for Aretha Franklin's "Respect" or Mitch Ryder and The Detroit Wheels' "Sock It To Me - Baby!" Both of which preceded the FoD's "Grazin' " vocal version.
     
    Damiano54 likes this.
  9. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    You're right, of course. I forgot about them (they're not all that big on my radar). I suppose Laugh-in pulled the phrase from one of those records?

    Coney Island Sally was only summer '68. Good tune though.
     
  10. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    Probably. But, even if there weren't so much turmoil back then, these songs have sisen on their own merits. They are that good! I mean...look at what we have today, and the world's still in turmoil.
     
    Cheevyjames likes this.
  11. HGN2001

    HGN2001 Mystery Picture Member

    Trivia time: Herb Alpert had "This Guy's In Love With You" at #1. It was pushed off the charts by Hugh Masekela's "Grazin' In The Grass". In the 1970's Herb Alpert would team up with Hugh Masekela for two albums:
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  12. bare trees

    bare trees Forum Resident

    For some reason, this sounds like a record from the early to mid 1970s to me.
     
    Damiano54 likes this.
  13. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    The 60s saw a very rapid change in music.
     
  14. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Wow! Herb looked way sexier with a moustache.
     
    SomeCallMeTim likes this.
  15. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Next up is "Hello, I Love You" by the Doors, #1 from August 3 - August 16, 1968.

     
  16. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    It's amazing how the #1's in 1968 careened from easy listening instrumentals to songs like this. ecclectic year to be sure.
     
    Dougd and Grant like this.
  17. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    Ok, we're officially at this song, so I'll answer. On the first point, there's no reason you can't be concise and poetic! I think "Hello, I love you" is very poetic, it just happens to be short. Hell, "Eleanor Rigby" is just barely over two minutes. You can say plenty when you and your band are focused - this record sounds like a band that's focused. I do realize that maintaining focus was probably not Jim Morrison's strong suit.

    [next bolded point] It is a lot of the Doors' identity, and I don't have a problem with a lot of it - I can't really listen to "The End," but I understand it, why they wanted to do it, and what it brings to that first record. I guess it's not that I hated those sorts of Doors' songs so much, it's that I wanted more "Hello I love you," "Break on Through" type songs from them. I agree they probably were not at all into making the kinds of radio hits that a record company would want - they had some freedom in that regard cause they sold a lot of albums, whether there were hits or not.

    It's really not a doors-specific preference for me - I'm going to always prefer a tight, succinct version of a song. With some bands, that just doesn't work (a band like Yes or the Allman Brothers, others) , but we have examples from the Doors that work exceptionally well - like this one. I just wish we had more.

    It didn't always work - you mentioned "Touch me," which is a shorter, hit-format type song that I think just doesn't work at all, but not cause it's trimmed of its excess, but because it's just a poor song.
     
    SomeCallMeTim likes this.
  18. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I love the bridge of this song and the guitar slide into it. Just brilliant work. I pretty much love all of their hits, though - great, deliciously off-kilter pop work.
     
    SomeCallMeTim likes this.
  19. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Would easily make my Top 40 for the entire decade, it's a stunningly beautiful song and a phenomenal performance.
     
    AppleBonker and Tim S like this.
  20. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I like "Love Is Blue", but "Classical Gas" bests it, and is one of the top instrumentals of the decade. Beautiful acoustic guitar work and a really innovative arrangement.
     
    AppleBonker and Cheevyjames like this.
  21. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    It was a very weird year. While it has plenty of great #1s, I think it has more duds than '66 or '67, and quite a few more-deserving #2 and #3 hits. In addition to "Classical Gas", "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" was a spectacular bit of work and truly iconic. "Those Were The Days" meanwhile was a striking bit of chart nostalgia, and a continuation of McCartney's growing obsession with pre-rock pop.
     
    AppleBonker and Dougd like this.
  22. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I'm flabbergasted. I thought I knew most big hits from this period forward, but had never heard this dud while growing up. Radio was more regional in America years ago, so maybe this wasn't a big hit in Arizona or maybe the local oldies radio in Phoenix never picked it up. Whatever the cause, I'm thankful, because it's a steaming terd of a tune and I'm stunned it made it onto the Top 40, let alone to the top of the charts. Nostalgia for crummy tearjerker songs from the late '50s / early '60s? Payola? Would love to know how this thing did so well. It's dull, formless, trite and annoying. Did people call in to request it so they could laugh at it, a la Florence Foster Jenkins?
     
    SomeCallMeTim and Cheevyjames like this.
  23. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I love that a very simple, delightful groove managed to bob all the way up to the top of the charts.
     
  24. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Another iconic cut from Simon and Garfunkel, it's always been one of my favorites, and culturally always seemed to me to be one of the more important hits of the decade.

    A delightfully off-kilter song from a devilishly off-kilter film set in a disturbingly off-kilter time. The song itself gets incredible mileage juxtaposing it's light 'n lovely melody and playing against much darker lyrical themes derived from The Graduate. And it checks "I Am The Walrus", showing that even in contemporary times, the great ones already knew which side of that Beatles single really mattered.
     
    pablo fanques likes this.
  25. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I've always been surprised this was the #1 and not Dionne Warwick's version - although Herb's is pleasant enough (if a bit dull). I guess it appealed to the moms.

    I think the best version is Dusty's.

    This Girl's In Love With You / Dusty Springfield
     
    Manapua and Damiano54 like this.

Share This Page