EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Don't listen to radio much so wouldn't know. Always loved "Smackwater Jack".

    As I've grown older I think my favorite cut from the record has become "Home Again". It's just drenched with those trademark warm Carole King chords:

     
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  2. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Forum Resident

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    I never knew P.P. Arnold was an Ikette. What a VOICE!
     
  3. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    I've shared the story before of the greatest bargain I've ever scored: The summer I was 15, I was at my best friend's place when his mother came home pissed off about an argument with her boyfriend and kicked me out of the house. On my way home, I happened across a yard sale where I got a copy of Introducing the Beatles for a quarter - every cloud has a silver lining!

    I also got my first copy of Tapestry at that yard sale, and for the same price. I'd read about it, and I'm sure I'd heard "It's Too Late" on the radio at some point, and I figured it couldn't miss with me. It didn't. What a great album! I don't feel it's aged a day since then, either. These days it's usually the Carnegie Hall Concert CD I reach for, which has most of the songs on Tapestry (I think all except the title track and "Where You Lead," neither of which were ever among my favorites) plus some very well-rendered songs from her previous album, Writer and some other classics-to-be. But I do still see Tapestry as her masterpiece.

    As you might guess from my story above, that friend and his mother had a terrible relationship. I literally can't recall him having one nice thing to say about her. But I do have exactly one memory, in all the years when we were friends, where they at least almost bonded over something. That something was Tapestry: I brought my copy over once to listen to while we were playing chess or something like that, and she overheard it. "Carole King!" she exclaimed with uncharacteristic approval for our musical tastes (which were about 95% Beatles at the time). "I used to listen to this in college!"

    As things later went from bad to worse, and ultimately he ended up living on the streets for a while as even that was preferable to putting up with his mother, I always did - and still do - treasure that slight but sweet memory.
     
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  4. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Tapestry was the album to beat and went on to an extremely successful uninterrupted run on the album charts for the better part of the decade. It's one of those rare albums where there really are no clunkers from those iconic piano chords that open the record right through to the heartfelt sentiments of the title track which also serves as it's closer. Pretty much everyone loved this record in '71 and though it may not have ushered in the singer/songwriter craze of the early 70s, it's mega success certainly opened up the floodgates. The tendrils of this album would weave their way through the top spot again in short order.
     
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  5. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    Oh yeah! Radio played both sides of that record like crazy! I liked "It's Too Late" and my sister liked "I Feel The Earth Move". But, we never bought any of her music until I bought "Jazzman" in 1974. I didn't own the "Tapestry" album until I bought the "A Natural Woman - The Ode Collection 1968-1976" boxed set in the early 90s, which contains the entire album.

    Crazy to know that the album was basically a demo with slight overdubs added to parts of it to flesh it out. The company executives thought the demos were good enough to be released as is, and, boom! Brill Building songwriter and producer Carole King was suddenly a superstar in her own right.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  6. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    There were at least four different variations of the label on this, all having to do with label typesetting: Columbia's three plants in Pitman, Terre Haute and Santa Maria; and Monarch via Alco Research. For me, the "go-to" is Pitman's. There were two ways the label was printed, and each way is on a different side.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    That was actually the follow up single . . .
    [​IMG]
    . . . coupled with "So Far Away":
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    There were two label variants of this one - Richard credited as arranger/orchestrator . . .
    [​IMG]
    . . . and him only credited as arranger . . .
    [​IMG]
    Natch', I have the former. And in the CBS Pitman type you see.

    But there would be a few more double-sided #1's (including one this year we'll get to at the appropriate time) over the next few years.
     
  8. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    And a genre - if not born already - takes off to the skies.
     
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  9. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Forum Resident

    What can I say? Tapestry is one of my favorite albums of the 70's - really of all time. Just a brilliant collection of tunes. It's Too Late was everywhere and for a long time too, it had longevity, and appealed to a wide audience. While I'm a fan of Carpenters, RD&M is way inferior to It's Too Late/I Feel The Earth Move.
     
  10. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    "Rainy Days And Mondays," though, is the stronger of the two sides of that Carpenters' 45. Don't believe me? . . . listening to Richard on the flip, one wonders if he has some kind of thing in his speech reminiscent of Dash Crofts of Seals & Crofts . . .
     
  11. HGN2001

    HGN2001 Mystery Picture Member

    Back in my hometown of Philly, -the- radio station that everyone listened to was WFIL (AM). It had a big signal, all the kids listened to it for all of the top 40 songs and the "boss jocks". You could be out on the street in the summertime without a radio and still listen as every car that went by had the station blaring from its speakers.

    That said, I listened to its FM sister station, WFIL-FM, a lighter sounding station that catered more toward the adult population with what we'd call Adult Contemporary today, but even softer than that, They'd play instrumentals once in awhile, and none of the harsher songs in the charts. That's where I went to hear the great Bacharach-David songs sung by Dionne Warwick, softer Beatles tracks like "Michelle" and "Something", Nancy Sinatra and sometimes her Dad, my A&M favorites Herb and the Brass, Sergio Mendes, and the new duo Carpenters. I rarely expected too much crossover between the AM and FM, except on the bigger soft hits. So yeah, I would hear Carpenters big hits on the AM along with occasional one-offs like the Peppermint Rainbow or a song like "1900 Yesterday" on the big AM station.

    And so in the summer of 1971, while listening to my soft FM station, I heard this Carole King record, "It's Too Late." It was a pleasant record, not too harsh sounding at all, and I thought it to be a new and pleasant FM type of record. Then one day I happened into a pizza place (Marios & Ginos) in the 69th street hub of Upper Darby. While enjoying my slice and soda for lunch, I was bombarded with the big, bombastic sound of WFIL-AM, probably playing something by the Rolling Stones or something else from the rock charts. And on came "It's Too Late" by Carole King and I recognized it as that new song I was hearing on the FM station. Somehow hearing it on the AM station gave the record a gravitas that I hadn't considered before, and I knew that this Carole King would be a force to be reckoned with.

    In short order, I was hearing the flip side on both stations, and all of a sudden I needed to grab the album. It was a pleasant surprise to find out that the ODE70 label was manufactured and distributed by my favorite A&M Records, and I followed Carole King's career for years afterward. Good memories.
     
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  12. bare trees

    bare trees Forum Resident

    Want Ads - It reminds me of "I Want You Back" by the Jackson 5.

    It's Too Late - I didn't hear this until the late 80s. A classic that deserved its number one position on the 40 charts. I still holds up remarkably well today.
     
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  13. CliffL

    CliffL Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sacramento CA USA
    Wow, I never knew "It's Too Late" was the B-side! This forum never ceases to educate me.
     
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  14. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    Pretty sure it's considered a double A side, the promo copies don't single out either side to "plug"
     
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  15. Bruce M.

    Bruce M. Forum Resident

    What can I say. As a kid I listened to the radio a lot. And nothing made me change stations faster than the Carpenters coming on. After all these years they still trigger my gag reflex.
     
  16. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    Cool, thanks for the response! I wonder what Danny's name was on the Flintstones? Danny Hutstone I would guess...
     
  17. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Interesting about the demo info! I always thought it sounded "rough", having none of the gloss and sheen of a true studio album. Shows how important good songs are to the process. In retrospect, it's amazing Lou didn't recognize the potential of both songs and basically gave It's Too Late away by putting it on the back side! Great, iconic album.
     
  18. CliffL

    CliffL Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sacramento CA USA
    I don't think he had a name...it was the episode where Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm became singers. Fred Flintstone had a dream (nightmare?) during the show and several singers in the dream appeared in succession-one of them was Danny Hutton, singing a snippet of his hit "Roses Are Rainbows". Of course, this song just happened to be on Hanna Barbera Records, the animator duo who had their own label at the time-an early example of product placement! I haven't seen the episode since the early 80s, and I'm dying to see it again since my memory of it is very fuzzy.
     
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  19. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    I'm sure he did. It was common for labels to put two potential hits on each side of a 45 to see which one would win. IN this case, they both won. From looking at the labels posted above, I see no indication that one was supposed to be on the A-side.

    I remember that episode. I think the song was sped up a bit, too.
     
  20. John B Good

    John B Good Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    NS, Canada
    I remember when I bought a cd version of the Tapestry album in the mid 80s and we listened to the LP and the cd to compare the sounds...

    The cd seemed duller.
     
  21. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Remember also that Carole King was not really regarded as a singer outside of a couple of singles in the 60s. The record company probably intended these songs to be covered by other artists the same way her songs usually were, thus the demo quality of the recording. Just look at the difference between these tunes and something like Jazzman 3 years later.
     
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  22. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    What's with the "70Ode" logo? Some copies have it, and some don't. How long did Ode use that?
     
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  23. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Uh..... yeah. Whatever Posessed Richard to sing a song with that many "S's" in it, is a mystery to me!
     
  24. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    The best #1 we've had so far this year, Carole is a legend.
     
  25. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    I love cute remedy's like this, especially when it's been so long. Moments in time so far gone but never forgotten.
     
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