EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. tmoore

    tmoore Forum Resident

    Location:
    Olney, MD
    "It's Too Late" is one of my favorite songs ever. Favorite Carole King song, favorite song of any of what we call "singer-songwriters". The album is also great.

    I heard this a song a lot on the radio at that time, and in almost all the intervening years. It's one of those timeless songs that doesn't seem to age.

    As I have mentioned I was 4 in 1971.
    I apologize for the following as it is juvenile, but it is an integral part of my early relationship with this song.
    I'm told that I used to sing "It's Kool-Aid" instead of "It's Too Late" (I used to drink a lot of Kool-Aid in the '70s).
     
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  2. Finchingfield

    Finchingfield Forum Resident

    Location:
    Henrico, Va
    I think this is live in England early 1972, maybe from a BBC show. Still waiting for an official release of this show on DVD !!!

     
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  3. John22

    John22 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Northern Germany
    Do not show the numbers 66031 and 66032 which is the A-side and the B-side?

    I know it from German vinyl singles like 45-69477 / 45-69478 and later 75977 / 75978.[/QUOTE]
     
  4. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    King's albums post Tapestry are peppered with some really good cuts even though she never attained those heights again. This one from Fantasy has always been a favorite. Surprising someone like Streisand never covered it.

     
  5. HGN2001

    HGN2001 Mystery Picture Member

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Typically with A&M (and many labels), the lower matrix number would indicate an a-side while a higher number indicates a b-side. Here the (66031) matrix is on "I Feel The Earth Move" which would tend to make it the a-side. There are exceptions, and I believe this to be one of those cases. If it were meant to be a true double a-side, then one number HAS to be higher than the other, even though both are considered equal.
     
  6. CliffL

    CliffL Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sacramento CA USA
    My brothers and I used to think the Buckinghams were singing "Canada Dry" when we heard "Kind Of a Drag" on the radio.
     
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  7. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    The Wikipedia article also mentions that "I Feel The Earth Move" was the intended A-side.

    Not surprising really. It's the more traditionally poppy and uptempo number. "It's Too Late" is moody and melancholy and wouldn't be my pick either for the first single off Tapestry. And yet, it was an enormous commercial success and made Tapestry one of the best selling albums of all time.

    Shows you what I know!
     
  8. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    The initial CD was pretty bad, I thought. The SACD sounded wonderful - I got that master, converted to 24/88.8 PCM, from HDTracks awhile back. I think it's fantastic.
     
  9. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    They used to show bits of that week after week on an Aussie music show Happening '71.

    Tapestry was on A&M in Australia. Previous Ode records had been on CBS.
     
  10. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    [/QUOTE]

    It's too late would have been my pick. It's just a better quality song, and fit in with the things that James Taylor, Carly Simon, Bread, and Carpenters were doing (i'm not sure when Carly Simon started releasing singles).
     
  11. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Simon first charted in 1964 with Winkin' Blinkin' and Nod as a duet with sister Lucy. It hit #73. Her first solo hit That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be debuted in April '71.
     
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  12. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be!
    :D
     
  13. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Yeah, Carly had made it to the Top 10 with "That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be", released in April of '71, but that was almost simultaneous with the release of "It's Too Late", which also came out in April of '71.
     
  14. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    It was actually Ode '70, and was known as such from 1970 - the year Adler set up his Ode label with A&M - to near the end of '71, basically. First-pressings of Ms. King's "Sweet Seasons" single (the first off her follow-up album Carole King Music) also were on that Ode '70 label design. She and Cheech & Chong basically made up for the loss of Spirit (Ode's biggest act to that point) to Epic.
     
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  15. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    My earliest memory of Ms. Simon's "That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be" was via a filmed early video of her, in an apartment near a window, singing it in an episode of The Great American Dream Machine on public TV (that'd be Channel 13 in my neck o' the woods).
     
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  16. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    It's Too Late/I Feel the Earth Move

    Carole King is without question one of the most important songwriters of the sixties and seventies. Either along with her partner/husband Gerry Goffin or alone, she wrote an unbelievable list of great classics, including a bunch that we have already talked about on this thread. Check it out: they created songs like Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow (while she was still a teenager!), Take Good Care of My Baby, Some Kind of Wonderful, the Loco-motion!, Go Away Little Girl, Up on the Roof, One Fine Day, I'm Into Something Good, Don't Bring Me Down (memorably recorded by the Animals), and You Make Me Feel (Like a Natural Woman). They also wrote several great songs for the Monkees, notably Sweet Young Thing (co-written with Mike Nesmith), Sometime in the Morning, Take a Giant Step, Pleasant Valley Sunday, Star Collector and As We Go Along (a solo number) and Porpoise Song from Head. No less a personage than John Lennon once said that when the Beatles started, their biggest goal was to become another Goffin and King, and the group covered a couple of their songs on record and radio (specifically Chains).

    [​IMG]

    There is no over-exaggerating just what a huge, huge record Tapestry was in the early 70s. She had tried to become a singer earlier with little success, but when she finally hit, she hit in as big a way as you can imagine.

    I'll be honest. I've heard only a small smattering of the stuff she's done as a performer. I freely admit she's a pretty good singer, but I haven't yet heard the number done by her that sinks me as much as her stuff when covered by other artists (of course, if you are covered by Aretha, that's a big talent to live up to). As far as these two #1 hits we are talking about, It's Too Late is just a bit too mellow and seventies for my taste. But I Feel the Earth Move is another story. Man, that song kicks all sorts of butt! Like others have mentioned, I love the way the piano starts things with an immediate bang, and the song does not let up all the way through, until it finally starts to wind down very dramatically at the very end. That's one of my favorite pop song endings right there; a lot better than just fading the thing out!

    [​IMG]

    In the mid-nineties, Alison Anders wrote and directed a film called Grace of My Heart that was nothing less than a love letter to Brill Building pop singers. Ileana Douglas plays 'Denise Waverly', a thinly disguised homage to Carole King, who is married to a Goffin clone played by Eric Stoltz. There are also characters based on Leslie Gore and Brian Wilson (played by Matt Dillon! Yeah, that's some strange casting there). Folks who like that era of pop ought to check it out, you might just enjoy it.

    The centerpiece moment of the film comes as Waverly tries to go from being a pop writer to a performer (sound familiar?). With the help of Dillon/Wilson, she sings one of her songs, God Give Me Strength. It's actually a great number, written in real life by Elvis Costello and Burt Bacharach (and sung by Kristen Vigard with enthusiastic lip synching by Douglas). And here's that performance from the film. I think she passed the audition!

     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  17. Damiano54

    Damiano54 Forum Resident

    I don't recall even hearing of this version but it just occurred to me that ITL might
    be a good one for Lesley Gore. So YT revealed this.

     
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  18. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Looking over the original Hot 100 charts, "It's Too Late" was the only side listed for the first five weeks. On June 12 when it hit #6, the listing changed to "It's Too Late / I Feel The Earth Move". That's how it stayed for the rest of the chart run, including the #1 weeks.

    Billboard's methodology at the time was to list both sides if both had "significant" airplay. Before 1970, the sides would've charted separately.
     
  19. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Correct me if I'm mistaken, but wasn't "I Feel The Earth Move" written in the wake of the Feb. 9, 1971 earthquake that hit the San Fernando valley?
     
  20. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    It's Too Late is okay but I don't really get the massive affection for it. So many songs I vastly prefer and which I consider much better did much less ...

    I haven't heard It Might as Well Rain Until September in years, so I'm YouTubing it as I type this post. It has a lot of nostalgia value for 1962 and I like songs with nostalgia value these days but for some reason I just rarely give it a listen.

    At the time in the U. K. there was another Carole King song that had not yet fallen off the charts when this one was released in 1962, but I can't remember what it was.
     
  21. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    Nothing wrong with this, but it's almost a clone of King's own version. the phrasing is exactly the same on every line - I don't know when this was done, but if it predates King's release, my guess is Gore followed everything on King's demo exactly.
     
  22. Damiano54

    Damiano54 Forum Resident

    Yes, it really is just a remake of sorts. It was released on 1982 album, but I don't know the recording date
     
  23. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    I loved both of these records to death. I bought the singles (probably from a woolworths, even though I have no idea where I might have gotten the money) and played them to death. As a kid these were the first songs that I remember thinking were very "grown up" - they had a depth I hadn't really noticed or thought about before. And in particular "That's the way" was incredibly mournful to me, which I was actually drawn to. Shortly after buying these, my mom bought 'Tapestry' (along with a gazillion other people) and it did not leave rotation at our house for years and years.
     
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  24. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    "That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be" was a real jawdropper. It's very Joni-esque in the way it observes its characters' relationship predicaments (Simon was a huge fan), but with an almost Broadway-bent to it - huge drama. One of those truth bombs that gets chucked onto the pop charts every now and again, between all the insipid love songs.
     
  25. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    Couldn't be, Tapestry was released the next day.

    Was it "Take Good Care Of My Baby"? My understanding is "It Might As Well Rain Until September" was intended as a follow-up to that, but Don Kirshner liked the way her voice sounded on it too well to hand it off to Bobby Vee and put her version out instead. (Vee did record it, but it was only ever released as an album track.)

    Incidentally, Sheila Weller's Girls Like Us reports that the reason why King didn't have any more hit singles until Tapestry is that Gerry Goffin forbade her recording anything else. This is probably not true; numerous other sources (including King herself in her autobiography) say Goffin was, if anything, more supportive of her career than even she was at the time. The likelier truth is that with two kids at home, she simply didn't want to tour in support of her records.

    She did, though, record a few more singles, including this 1966 gem:

     

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