EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    That could be my fault since I posited it was probably the next song up. OP stated another controversial tune would appear very soon. Looking over the #1 tunes of '72, the Helen Reddy song was the only one that fit that description but seeing as it appears late in the year, I dismissed it. I'll explain my reasoning for naming the next #1 as possibly controversial when it comes up.
     
    Hey Vinyl Man and Grant like this.
  2. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Karen could sing with a head cold and a frog in her throat and still create a thing of beauty! :frog:
     
    Grant likes this.
  3. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Makng shure its write

    I've not heard that version of "Feeling Again" before - I don't have the Voice of the Heart album - but I must agree that she in incredible on it. And you've nailed my two favorite Carpenters songs as well - Goodbye to Love and Love Me For What I Am.
     
  4. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    I understand. We all want to get these songs going!:D That's partly why I went ahead and posted the first #1 single of 1972 on the Every #1 R&B thread this morning.
     
    Manapua likes this.
  5. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Unclassifiable

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    In light of this Helen Reddy discussion, it's interesting to note that our current #1 contains the line "Some people think I done all right for a girl", and that only one other woman would hit #1 in '72 (Roberta Flack).
     
    Grant and sunspot42 like this.
  6. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    But that one other hit would enjoy the longest stay at #1 - six weeks - of the year. I think 1972 also marks the beginning of a trend we'll see throughout the seventies: songs that got to #1 that absolutely no one will admit to liking today (Chuck Berry, we're looking at you...).
     
    Black Thumb and sunspot42 like this.
  7. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    I don't think this counts as "treading lightly." Disagreeing with groups of people doesn't mean they are nuts and creeps.
     
    Dougd, Zeki, Pickoid and 2 others like this.
  8. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    Wrong! I freely state that I like "My Ding-A-Ling". The question is why people dislike it. I think it's a cute little song.
     
    John22 and John54 like this.
  9. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Ok.... next up is "American Pie" by Don McClean, #1 from January 9 - February 5, 1972.

     
  10. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Actually, women hitting #1 were , for the most part, few and far between in the late 60s to early 70s time frame. Let's take the years '66 - '72 for example:

    '66 - Petula Clark, Nancy Sinatra & The Supremes
    '67 - Supremes, Aretha Franklin, Bobby Gentry & Lulu
    '68 - Jeannie C. Riley & The Supremes
    '69 - The Supremes
    '70 - Diana Ross
    '71 - Janis Joplin, The Honey Cone, Carole King, Cher & Melanie
    '72 - Melanie (carry-over from '71), Roberta Flack & Helen Reddy

    If Diana & The Supremes didn't exist, the number would drop to zero in '69 and '70 and drastically reduced during the years '64 through '68. A case could be made for including groups with female leads like The Carpenters or Shocking Blue but I went by stricter rules. Things were better in the pre-British Invasion years and later in the 70s.
     
    Black Thumb and sunspot42 like this.
  11. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    In Australia only the first couple of minutes was on the single and the B side was an album track. If you wanted the whole thing you had to buy the LP.

    Ian 'Molly' Meldrum (Australian rock guru) said the album was a lot of filler and United Artists should be ashamed of themselves for not putting the whole AP on the single.

    In reality the album is full of classic songs like Vincent and Castles in the Air and is probably one of the best singer-songwriter albums of the early 70s (if not all time)
     
  12. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Don't get me started. :wantsome:
     
    Hey Vinyl Man likes this.
  13. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    And It appears that this is the longest song to ever hit #1, clocking in at 8:32. As the 70's roll on, conventions of the past are quickly falling away.... although I think Richard Harris' "Macarthur Park" kind of broke the ice of that old concept that a song over 3 1/2 minutes would not have a chance of being a hit.
     
    sunspot42 likes this.
  14. ronm

    ronm Forum Resident

    Location:
    southern colo.
    These are the memories of ten year old at this time frame.I heard this everywhere at the time.It was ok then.Now I could take it or leave it.Not something you hear on the radio anymore.Although around these parts classic rock radio does not play this kind of music.There is no oldies station around here anymore.
     
    Grant likes this.
  15. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    When I was in college (early 90s), the jukebox at the pub we all frequented (because they were loose about checking IDs!) had the original US 45 with the song evenly split between the two sides. Many was the time we'd all be gathered around the jukebox singing our hearts out (which says a lot to begin with, since we're talking about a song that was a hit around the time we were all born), and head lustily into the next verse only to have the song fade away on us...then we'd just stand there patiently until the other side was cued up.

    If there's a last gasp of the sixties musically speaking, I think this is it. It really does sum up everything remarkably well at just about exactly the time the screw was finally turning. Of course McLean couldn't have known the big fifties nostalgia kick was right around the corner with American Graffiti and Happy Days, but it was the perfect time for a tribute to Buddy Holly (I do often wonder what the Woodstock crowd thought of their older brothers' and sisters' records) and a reminder that those early days of rock and roll really weren't that far in the past and the influence still lingered. A truly unique song, and one of the relatively few to get to #1, too.
     
    Witchy Woman, Manapua and sunspot42 like this.
  16. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    Elton John heard it and immediately wrote Crocodile Rock.
     
    pablo fanques, Grant and sunspot42 like this.
  17. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Wow. I have 3 stations in my range that play this regularly.
     
  18. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    If I question whether I actually recall some of the other recent #1's from precisely the time they topped the charts - I didn't turn three until late August of '71 - there's no doubt I remember this one from its time of release, since I was almost halfway to four by the time it began descending the charts and it was a total radio monster. My uncle had the 45 as well, which I often played growing up. In the early '80s, when I became somewhat obsessed with this general era for whatever reason, this hit was probably the biggest touchstone of the period for me after the theme from Shaft, "It's Too Late / I Feel The Earth Move" and "Smiling Faces, Sometimes".

    And that was astute for a 12 year old, because it's incredibly evocative of the times - a perfect example of folk-tinged singer/songwriter material, backward looking and melancholy, lamenting lost innocence. Perfectly captured the post-Altamont, deteriorating Vietnam War national malaise, which would continue to one degree or another thru the end of the decade and to some degree even beyond (in cuts like Billy Joel's "Allentown" or many of Springsteen's hits).

    Although the cut seems hermetically sealed in 1972, Madonna managed to have a massive hit with an abridged cover of it in 2000, released as part of the soundtrack to her The Next Best Thing film with Rupert Everett. Not released as a single in the US, it still managed to climb into the Top 30 just off radio play in the states, but was #1 across most of Europe. Although it's pushing 20 years old itself now, the video seems like a remarkably prescient overview of 21st century America.

     
  19. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    I really do not like this song, it's just bad to me, even Madonna didn't make me like it and I like everything she does.
     
    Cheevyjames likes this.
  20. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    I never understood the fifth verse... "Jack be nimble, Jack be quick... jack flash sat on a candlestick, cause fire is the devil's only friend. And as I watched him on the stage, my hands were clinched in fits of rage, no angel born in hell could break that satan's spell".. That's always been a head scratcher for me.
     
  21. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    McLean recorded a version for his Tapestry album but it dragged on and on. Later on, the guy on piano started playing what's on the record and Don sang some of the verses like he was Nino Tempo and the whole thing came together.
     
  22. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    I believe it refers to Altamont.
     
    Zeki, Grant, Witchy Woman and 2 others like this.
  23. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    And I was going to note (others got there first) that this song may well have been responsible for popularizing the '50s/'60s rock revival that brought us things like American Graffiti and Happy Days. That probably would have happened anyway to some degree or another, but a monster #1 record like this certainly would have attracted label - and even Hollywood's - attention. It let it be known to commercial interests that this kind of nostalgia had a huge market and could be profitable.
     
  24. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    The Rolling Stones at Altamont
     
  25. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    That makes sense now that you mention it.
     
    Grant likes this.

Share This Page