EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    The girl who sang the blues in verse six is Janis Joplin, the sacred store is the Fillmore.
     
  2. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    The king is Elvis, the jester is Dylan.
     
  3. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    According to that song's Wikipedia page, it was "Eagle Rock" by Daddy Cool that inspired "Crocodile Rock" (which would at least explain Elton and Bernie's choice of reptile in the lyrics).
     
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  4. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    True.... This did seem to open the floodgates didn't it? Not just 50's, but other decades were in it as well, besides Happy Days, American Graffiti, Grease, and Shanana, there were ragtime influences, and big band as well... with this coming in at #8 at the end of the year, and even more to come in 1973, as we'll discuss later.
     
  5. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    Eagle Rock is a better song. #1 for ten weeks in Australia(and it would have been longer but it broke later in Sydney than the other capital cities)
     
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  6. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Oh god, you've just opened the door to page after page of dissecting the lyrics of this song. I'm off to work now so I'll be back in the new year to weigh in. Happy New Year to all!
     
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  7. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    Richard Nader's rock revival shows were going on at the time so American Pie was at the right place at the right time. Rick Nelson's Garden Party is the anti American Pie.
     
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  8. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Actually, I'd say that older styles - like Tin Pan Alley and even earlier influences - came in with the hippies and The Mamas And The Papas and those tacked pianos on cuts like "Words Of Love" or Cass covering "Dream A Little Dream Of Me". See also hits like "Those Were The Days" by Mary Hopkins, or heck Melanie's "Brand New Key" for that matter. I think American Pie simply kicked down the door for '50s and early '60s influences to also come roaring onto the charts.
     
  9. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    When the White Album came out half the musicians were influenced by Helter Skelter the other half were influenced by Honey Pie.
     
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  10. W.B.

    W.B. Senior Member

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Not really. The 45 ish of "American Pie" (United Artists single #50856) was broken up into two parts (at 4:11 and 4:31). Some stations didn't even play the second part at the time. But I do have the original LP with the full version, plus a Mobile Fidelity "remastered" CD.

    I like The Worst Rock & Roll Records Of All Time book's take on that section (they placed this song at #9 among the 50 worst rock and roll songs of all time as they saw it) - "When he sang about Satan standing on the stage, was he referring to Mick Jagger? Jim Morrison? Neil Diamond? Who knows? Who cares?"
     
  11. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Unclassifiable

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    How do you make "American Pie" even more '70s? Give it to the Brady Bunch!

     
  12. ronm

    ronm Forum Resident

    Location:
    southern colo.
    I remember at this time(72) listening to my older sisters oldies records.They were marketed as oldies records.Hell the songs were only ten years old some of them.
     
  13. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    I guess I'm going by the stations in my area, which did play the full version, the DJ's relished the long version as they did Macarthur Park, because it afforded them a nice bathroom break.
     
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  14. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Oh no, you didn't!!! LOL
     
  15. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    I've heard of that cover before, but never heard it. I'm glad I hadn't!
     
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  16. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    So did Genesis in Visions of Angels, at 4:44:



    I am definitely not a fan of Helen Reddy's work, but on this point I'll say just cut her some slack.
     
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  17. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I can take or leave American Pie, but I don't think it deserves to be anywhere near any of the "worst song ever" lists. It Dylan had written it the critics would be singing a different tune entirely. I prefer Vincent, Empty Chairs, etc. though.

    Actually what American Pie reminds me of mostly is dating for the first time in the spring of 1972 ... ! :righton:
     
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  18. tommy-thewho

    tommy-thewho Forum Resident

    Location:
    detroit, mi
    Overly long song but it is good.
     
  19. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    :agree:
     
  20. Solitaire1

    Solitaire1 Carpenters Fan

    The song was on the album Interpretations. It is a collection containing Carpenters songs that were not written by Richard Carpenter. "Trying To Get The Feeling" was thought to have been lost (the final version was and the work lead is all that remained) but it was found and production completed. If you are interested in the album, here's a link to its Wikipedia page: Interpretations: A 25th Anniversary Celebration - Wikipedia

    The song was written for the Carpenters and this version features the original lyrics. Manilow's version has a majority of the lyrics rewritten and in his box set The Complete Collection...And Then Some it was mentioned that David Pomeranz (the song's writer) was still revising the song after Manilow had recorded it.

    By the way, my favorite Carpenters song is "I Need To Be In Love." I found "Love Me For What I Am" on the B-Side of the "Solitaire" single, played it, and rarely played the A-Side again. While "Solitaire" is a great performance, like with "Desperado," I'm not a fan of the song itself.
     
  21. Solitaire1

    Solitaire1 Carpenters Fan

    An okay song but one I think has been hurt by the entire legend that has come up around it. For me, it gets in the way of enjoying the song. However, the impact of the song is shown by "Weird Al" Yankovic choosing it to be one of his classic song parodies (a parody of a song that is not current but that everyone knows) as "The Saga Begins" (the entire story of Star Wars - Episode One - The Phantom Menace).


    I agree about Don McLean being a great song writer. I have the album Tapestry and I at least like every song on the album. I purchased it for the song "Castles In The Air" (one of my favorite McLean songs) and discovered that the version on Tapestry was a different version from the one I'd heard on the radio (which had a heavy percussion backing) and I liked the Tapestry version better.

    I thought the reason the song was split into two parts on the single is that one side of a 45 could not hold the entire song (I know there have been other songs that have been split on the single for the same reason). I don't know if it would have helped but they could have done the single at 33 1/33 to allow for more playing time.


    I thought it was a reference to The Rolling Stones (just like "Sergeants" refers to The Beatles).
     
  22. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    They played the single version for about a month and then one day they played a version that didn't fade out and had the remaining verses (starting with Helter Skelter in a summer swelter) and since that day I've never heard radio play anything but the album version. I probably knew next to nothing about the history of rock and roll but I could work out what some of it meant (Byrds flew out of a fallout shelter. Eight miles high and falling fast ... seemed pretty obvious) Supposedly McLean wanted the sound to start in mono then change to widescreen stereo as it went on. The piano really pushes it alone and the writing gets better after the second verse.
     
  23. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Makng shure its write

    American Pie is certainly ambitious, but after hearing it hundreds of times, I think it's more of a kitchen sink song - McLean tosses in references everywhere just for the sake of keeping the song going. A friend of mine was obsessed with the lyrics back in college (early 80's) and he went on and on about the meaning of each line. After about a month of this non-stop, I decided that the song had a superiority complex about it. How "good music" died along with Buddy Holly, and all the stuff that came after was junk you couldn't dance to. I can hardly stand the song now, partly because of McLean's supposed attitude (on my part) and partly because of burnout. I think McLean would do much better things; Vincent for example, is hauntingly beautiful and the album Homeless Brother makes some powerful statements.
     
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  24. HGN2001

    HGN2001 Mystery Picture Member

    Interesting effect. I just tried mono-ing out the opening and letting it expand to stereo.
     
  25. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Unclassifiable

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    The fantastic piano work on "American Pie" is by Paul Griffin, who also played on Blonde on Blonde and other sessions with the Jester.
     

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