EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Back again after a little sabbatical. :winkgrin:

    Anyway, here are a couple I missed:

    The Streak

    I certainly remember this song, and the bemused reaction of my parents to the streaking phenomenon, but for some reason I always think this one came out more around 1976. Perhaps the trend hadn't entirely died out by then, who knows?

    Anyway, we kids loved stupid stuff like this. I recall having an entire album of novelty hits which included this song and stuff like They're Coming to Take Me Away, Ha Haa. Lookit dat, lookit dat! was kind of a catch phrase with us for a time.

    Billy, Don't be a Hero

    This was another of the songs that my little brother really loved. His best friend was coincidentally named Billy, and so he got more than a little teasing because of this number.

    I know it's among the most hated songs of the era, but I think it's OK, a decent if unspectacular poppy number. In a way it's the anti-Green Berets; whereas that song celebrated a green beret hoping his son would follow in his footsteps (and die?), this song has the heroine pointedly reject Billy for sacrificing his life in a war. This was the tail end of the Vietnam War (technically over, but still ahead was the fall of Saigon), and a gung-ho song about war was probably not going to be a big seller in that era.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
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  2. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Band on the Run

    All right! After a few years wandering around in the musical desert, Paul finally got it completely right! Interestingly, the production of this song and album seemed like it was fated to be a disaster. For some reason, he decided to record the album in Nigeria. Two of the band's members quit before he left, leaving just himself, Linda and Denny Laine to make the record. Then, he got mugged at knifepoint in Lagos, losing demo tapes he had made. He also made enemies of some local musicians, including Fela Kuti, who suspected he was there to swipe some of their sounds.

    It was a difficult effort, but the results were well worth it. It's my second favorite Wings album (Venus and Mars is my personal fave), although I didn't actually buy it until college for some reason. My favorite number is definitely Jet, which is soaring pop at its finest, but 1985 is also incredible in the way it builds up to that amazing climax. And it was really cool how he borrowed a little from his ex-partner Mr. Lennon with Let Me Roll It; John appreciated the sentiment and loved the track.

    Below: the iconic album cover with James Coburn standing out among the escapees

    [​IMG]

    The title song is classic McCartney. I personally believe the 'if we ever get out of here' line might have had extra resonance to him given the challenges of making the record. Only Paul could take three disparate parts like this, weld them together, and create magic like this (although another 1974 classic, Bohemian Rhapsody, is a great example of someone else pulling from Paul's bag of tricks to great effect).

    As I mentioned previously, my favorite part is when the song first breaks into the third part of the song. It's like emerging from a deep tunnel into the bright sunlight, perfectly capturing the theme of imprisonment and escape. The bit where Paul sings 'and the county juuuuuudge, who held a grudge...' is one of my favorite Paul moments of the 70s. Man do I love this song!

    Since we've already heard Band, here's the flip side, 1985 (technically, Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five). Paul was really hitting on all cylinders with this one. I love his live versions of this from the seventies, but here's an unusual, unreleased video from 1974 featuring Paul vamping on piano early on, then doing karaoke with the actual recording later on (doing his best Cory-Wells-from-Three-Dog-Night impersonation). And he doesn't even have to put his cigarette down. It's all awesome!

     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
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  3. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    OK, that I didn't know. Interesting! (never heard of Paul Da Vinci, either. Man, I thought that guy was gonna bust a gut when he hit those high notes at the end of the clip they posted of him).
     
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  4. Archguy

    Archguy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Richmond VA
    Their harmonies on "Where Is the Love" are pretty stunning.

    Rubina Flake...ha! Learn something new every day.
     
  5. Grant

    Grant A 60s, 70s & 90s Lovin' Musical Free-Spirit

    Really? Wow!

    Here in the U.S., Emergency ran until 1977, I think, while The Partridge Family went out of production in 1974, the same year Sherwood Schwartz pulled the plug on The Brady Bunch.
     
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  6. Grant

    Grant A 60s, 70s & 90s Lovin' Musical Free-Spirit

    Oh yeah! One of the softest, sweetest songs ever. It was produced by Roberta Flack under an alias "Rubina Flake".
     
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  7. Grant

    Grant A 60s, 70s & 90s Lovin' Musical Free-Spirit

    Are you serious? It was all over the radio. I was in Jr high by then, and it was played at every dance. The album stayed on the charts so long that she released another single from it one year later.
     
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  8. ronm

    ronm audiofreak

    Location:
    southern colo.
    Serious as a heart attack.Guess I wasn't listening to the radio much at this time.
     
  9. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    This was one of two Number Ones on Atlantic from this year to bear two catalogue numbers in the course of its chart life. Originally issued on 45-3025, by the time its chart run ended it had been renumbered 45-3203.

    It was also one of two Number Ones whereby there would be entirely different songs of the same or similar title by the rock group Bad Company. Natch', I prefer this smooth number by Ms. Flack over the one Bad Company did. The other record in question they did, may have affected the title of the other Number One which we'll be looking at some time from here.
     
  10. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    I seem to remember reading, since we're referring to Emergency!, that Julie London (a Forum favorite who played Nurse Dixie McCall on the show) was glad for the success of the two "heart-throb" stars, Kevin Tighe and Randolph Mantooth, and they all remained in touch for years after the series ended.
     
  11. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    On the 45, the label indicated "Produced by: Flack." Joel Dorn was credited as executive producer, and her co-producers on this silky number were listed as "[Leon] Pendarvis, [Eugene] McDaniels & [Louise] Fleming." And correct me if I'm mistaken, but wasn't Eugene McDaniels who wrote "Feel Like Makin' Love," one and the same as Gene McDaniels of "A Hundred Pounds Of Clay," "Tower Of Strength" and "Point Of No Return" fame? I seem to have read in the affirmative . . .
     
  12. Grant

    Grant A 60s, 70s & 90s Lovin' Musical Free-Spirit

    That makes sense. For the last year or two of the chart, you've been kind of surprised that such and such a song got to #1.
     
  13. Grant

    Grant A 60s, 70s & 90s Lovin' Musical Free-Spirit

    I should get that show on DVD or blue ray before that goes away, too.
     
  14. Grant

    Grant A 60s, 70s & 90s Lovin' Musical Free-Spirit

    I didn't pull out the 45, but I seem to remember that the album of the same name was credited as the producer being "Rubina Flake". I no longer have the album because it was a bit too mellow for my taste. I did rip the other single "Feelin' That Glow" and edited it down to the 45 RPM edited version.
     
  15. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    That's the thing, the "Rubina Flake" nom de plume must've been concocted in the wake of the single's success and in preparation for the release of the album.
     
  16. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Makng shure its write

    Feel Like Makin' Love is ok - a bit too smooth, or too mellow I guess. Never been a favorite.
     
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  17. WLL

    WLL Popery Of Mopery

    .Jumping back to " The Night Chicago Died ":
    -1- It certainly serves as another example of the fascination of so many 70s UK songwriter with Americana! From a distance.
    -2- As far as that goes, I recall reading one of the songwriters of TNCD saying people said to him, " there is no easy side of Chicago " - to which he said " Rubbish. every town has an east side " or similar - Meaning, of course, in the sense of an " East Side Of Chicago " that people make S thing about as they do over the South Side - or the Lower East Side of Manhattan, say. Chi-Towners here: Do people make much of a deal about the East Side Of Chicago?
    -3- My indelible 14-year-old memory of TNCD - being on a school bus, on a school trip, and this kinda thuggish - Well, by comparison to me - Puerto Rican kid was stomping up and down the school bus aisle singing along to the song!:bigeek:
    -4- However, speaking of Chicago's sides - I recall an episode of " Kolchak: The Night Stalker ", on TV at just this time!:edthumbs: - where Darren McGavin's narration sets up a killing talking about blocks in the South Side if Chicago where, contrary to the SS's image, Caucasian rednecks just up from the South gather, not black ones, in these " exception " blocks. The redneck is then killed by that week's monster, but anyway - Are, or were, their " Caucasian Haven " blocks in the South Side, breaking from its general demograpnhic:confused:?
     
  18. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    We haven't gotten there yet. :)


    I love "Feel Like Makin' Love." Everything I like best about lush '70s soul. Not a whole lot to say about it, just an all around great record!
     
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  19. Cheevyjames

    Cheevyjames Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham, NC
    Roberta Flack - Feel Like Makin' Love

    When I was really little, this song is what I imagined all 70's music to sound like. The "Quiet Storm" stuff as mentioned above. Jazzy, smooth vocal, delicate, light groove, prominent and gorgeous-sounding Fender Rhodes...yeah, Feel Like Makin' Love is the perfect embodiment of this style. What a great song and wonderful vocal. I get why this song went to #1 - it's addicting. I want to keep listening to it!
     
  20. Splungeworthy

    Splungeworthy Forum Rezidentura

    This is my first contribution to this huge thread, but I dip in occasionally to see where you're at. And you're where I want to be.
    So much pop goodness right here, my head is spinning. This was my golden age of singles collecting, and so many of the songs being discussed still resonate with me to this day, like:
    Billy Don't Be A Hero. It's celebrated for its cheese, but this is a seriously constructed pop masterpiece.
    Feel Like Making Love. Roberta Flack was an amazing singer, and this single, along with Where Is The Love, are two of my all time faves.
    Rock The Boat. One of my 70's touchstones. A beautifully smooth song, killer chorus, a true disco precursor.
    To many others that have already been thoroughly discussed, so I'll just comment as you move forward. Thank you for keeping it going. I love that you have pictures of the labels-it brings back so many fond memories, and it's basically how I remember these singles-not by what was written on the label, but the color of the label itself.
     
  21. WLL

    WLL Popery Of Mopery

    ...I somehow thought we'd gotten to 1975 already:shh:!:realmad::confused:







    ey Vinyl Man, post: 18882554, member: 23965"]We haven't gotten there yet. :)


    I love "Feel Like Makin' Love." Everything I like best about lush '70s soul. Not a whole lot to say about it, just an all around great record![/QUOTE]
     
  22. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Yah Mo B There

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    "Feel Like Makin' Love" is another on my list of female-sung "pure magic" hits from this era. The vocal is irresistible, as is the vibe established by the backing group.

    Kudos to Producer Flake (grin) for capturing the magic and getting it down on tape. It truly was Quiet Storm even before Smokey came out with the genre namesake.

    And yes, the writer is the Eugene Daniels of "Hundred Pounds of Clay" fame. He also wrote "Compared To What".
     
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  23. Joey Self

    Joey Self Red Forman's Sensitivity Guru

    I liked "Feel Like Makin' Love" at the time, and like it more now. I seem to think I have a Roberta Flack CD comp which surely has it.

    But since I'm not sure, I guess that reveals that I haven't played it too often over the years.

    JcS
     
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  24. tommy-thewho

    tommy-thewho Forum Resident

    Location:
    detroit, mi
    Not a big fan of FLML and I loved The First Time Ever.
     
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  25. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Makng shure its write

    FLML is not a barn burner in my book, but it isn't the worst #1 of the year either. Not by a LONG SHOT.
     

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