Fargo FX Original Series

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Scope J, Mar 15, 2014.

  1. Lonson

    Lonson I'm Just a Lucky So-and-So

    Location:
    Chardon, Ohio
    I thought she was going to play an exterminator?

    [​IMG]

    ;)
     
  2. xilef regnu

    xilef regnu Forum Resident

    Location:
    PNW
  3. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    Kirsten Dunst, a former child star who didn't self-destruct.
     
    ssmith3046 likes this.
  4. Lonson

    Lonson I'm Just a Lucky So-and-So

    Location:
    Chardon, Ohio
    I re-watched Season 2 on Blu-ray and enjoyed it even more. Love the production and filming of this. All the costuming and cars and furnishings. . . so on target for mid-west USA 1979. The filming used 'sixties lenses and this helps the setting and acting a lot.

    Even the UFO aspect works for me in this framework and the set up is there in little bits. And Lou himself (played by Carradine) in Season 1 says that in Sioux Falls he saw something he had never seen before or since. . . so it has an antecedent right from the start.

    And in the first decade of this century my wife, too young for this, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and didn't survive. That part of the storyline hit home. . . and was very well done.

    The long wait is on for Season 3. It will be worth the wait.
     
    slipkid, JimW, notesofachord and 8 others like this.
  5. notesofachord

    notesofachord Forum Resident

    Location:
    Utah's Dixie
    The teasers on FX have got me salivating for the new season.
     
    rburly and FritzL like this.
  6. rburly

    rburly This space for rent

    Location:
    Orlando
    Fargo Season 3 Trailer And Plot Synopsis Shed New Light On The Story

    An extended version of the new Fargo Season 3 trailer has arrived. Titled "Trapped," the video dives deeper into the story that focuses on the two characters that actor Ewan McGregor plays.

    These characters include Ray and Emmit Stussy. Emmit is the "Parking Lot King of Minnesota," while Ray is a balding, struggling parole officer. He lives with a "huge chip on his shoulder about the hand he's been dealt--and he blames his brother," according to the official synopsis from Collider.

    "Their sibling rivalry follows a twisted path that begins with petty theft but soon leads to murder, mobsters, and cut-throat competitive bridge," the description goes on.

    Other Season 3 newcomers include Gone Girl's Carrie Coon in the role of police department chief Gloria Burgle. Scott Pilgrim vs. The World actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead plays Ray's girlfriend, Nikki Swango, while Harry Potter actor David Thewlis plays V.M. Vargas, who is described as a "mysterious loner and true capitalist whose bosses plan to partner with Emmit, whether 'The Parking Lot King' likes it or not."

    Production on Fargo Season 3 took place in Calgary. The show was created by Noah Hawley (Bones, Legion); Joel and Ethan Coen, the directors of Fargo the movie, are executive producers.

    Season 3 premieres on April 19.

    Fargo Season 3 Trailer And Plot Synopsis Shed New Light On The Story
     
    Vinyl Addict likes this.
  7. misterdecibel

    misterdecibel Bulbous Also Tapered

    When they say "cut-throat competitive bridge" are they referring to the card game?
     
  8. Vinyl Addict

    Vinyl Addict Forum Resident

    Location:
    MA
    Yes, they showed a bit in the trailer.

     
    Alfie Noakes likes this.
  9. notesofachord

    notesofachord Forum Resident

    Location:
    Utah's Dixie
    It's kind of sad that David Thewlis is referred to the "the Harry Potter actor". Alas, such is the post J.K. Rowling world I suppose. I mean, a lion's share of the UK's finest actors made appearances in the Potter series of films, but do they have to be defined by that fact?

    Of course, Thewlis has already appeared in the Coen Brothers universe - as Maude Lebowski's artist/hipster friend:
     
  10. seaisletim

    seaisletim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    Knox Harrington, video artist
     
  11. rburly

    rburly This space for rent

    Location:
    Orlando
    Extended Fargo trailer doesn’t paint a pretty picture

    [​IMG]
    Fargo season three’s brotherly feud heats up in this new preview, which sees Ewan McGregor putting himself down and preparing to rob himself as brothers Ray and Emmit Stussy. The extended trailer folds in several other early looks at the new season of Noah Hawley’s anthology series, which will see Carrie Coon playing the long arm of the law opposite David Thewlis’ undoubtedly nefarious character. Truly, things are going to get ugly in this small town, though we won’t have to worry about anyone making meth out of frozen orange juice concentrate as that’s not actually a thing.

    You can visit Fargo beginning April 19 on FX.

    Extended Fargo trailer doesn’t paint a pretty picture
     
    Chris from Chicago likes this.
  12. rburly

    rburly This space for rent

    Location:
    Orlando
    ‘Fargo’ Review: Season 3 Remains a Masterful Midwestern Drama, But You’ll See It in a Terrifying New Light

    Ewan McGregor is a force to be reckoned with — twice over — but Carrie Coon is the only one who can save us in a bone-chilling new season.

    Chris Large/FX

    View Gallery
    10 Photos

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    This much we know after two years in Minnesota: Choosing to embark on a new season of “Fargo” is akin to inviting tragedy unto yourself. Each year, the opening disclaimer originated by the Coen Brothers in their 1996 film promises bodies: “This is a true story… At the request of the survivors… Out of respect for the dead…” And each year we’ve come to love and lose characters within a very short amount of time. You know what you’re getting yourself into, even if — like the UFOs in Season 2 — you can never predict exactly what you’ll see.

    READ MORE: ‘Archer Dreamland’ Review: Season 8 Goes Full Film Noir in Big Gamble That’s Already Paying Off

    As Season 3 begins, what’s oft-referred to as a black comedy, midwestern drama, or anthology crime story, feels better suited for another genre:

    Horror.

    Going in, you know any number of the characters you’re watching could die at any moment. Their end could be gruesome or sickly comical; deserved or regretted; outrageous or mundane. That you know it’s coming and have to wait creates enough suspense to make you hide your eyes, and the macabre atmosphere is rarely lifted. Most of all, “Fargo” plays into our fear of bad things happening to good people; of right and wrong not being matched by cause and effect. Noah Hawley’s series elicits empathy for almost everyone within it, and then makes you sit and wait in a tortured emotional state to discover who survives this death trap.

    [​IMG]

    Season 1 featured a literal interpretation of this savage ambush, when Billy Bob Thornton’s Lorne Malvo walked through a gangster’s office, murdering 22 people in the process, and one of its most impressive accomplishments was making us worry for the cold-blooded assassin’s safety. We knew Malvo deserved what came to him, but we didn’t root against him like a traditional antagonist.

    While Season 2 actually showed us the Sioux Falls massacre, it also kept us agonizing over the fate of its characters, namely Ted Danson’s Hank Larsson and his grown daughter, Betsey Solverson (Cristin Miliotti). Even though we knew Betsey passed away long before Lou thanks to the events in Season 1, audiences couldn’t bare to witness her death first-hand in the prequel season. Not when little Molly Solverson — the future hero of Season 1 — was just a quiet, happy little kid. Though good ultimately triumphed over evil, enough evil was done to make our heroes look at life differently from that moment forward.

    READ MORE: ‘Legion’ Finale Review: Noah Hawley Goes Full Marvel Without Losing What Makes This Series Revolutionary

    And during the opening minutes of Season 3, I found myself sitting and praying for the safety of Ray Stussy (Ewan McGregor) and Nicki Swango (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), an inherently likable and inherently mischievous couple whose providence washes away as the damning titles pop up over their little red Corvette.

    [​IMG]

    Like in a horror movie, fans may spend the first half-hour bargaining for the lives of every character. Ray and Nicki are instantly endearing. Shunned by high society because of their criminal associations — she’s an ex-con out on parole, and he’s her parole officer — the purity of their love steals the spotlight early and often; a powerful juxtaposition, two suspicious individuals bonded by true love, even as you see them plant the seeds of their own downfall.

    READ MORE: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Rules PaleyFest Panel as Showrunners Confirm One Major Theory

    Ray’s twin brother, Emmit (also played by McGregor, whose total embodiment of each character makes up for his Scottish accent slipping out every so often) is a bit trickier. Not exactly the warmest brother, Emmit is a successful businessman looking to protect what’s his, both financially and socially. Having Ray around, whose Sunday best appears to be an untucked button down and leather jacket, isn’t exactly simpatico with the image he wants to project.

    And then there’s Gloria Burgle (Carrie Coon), an honest cop trying to do what’s right by the badge and for her son. A woman defined by her patient, playful reaction to a broken automatic door that’s keeping her locked out in the cold, Burgle is instantly untouchable: meaning if anything happens to her, our hearts may never recover.

    [​IMG]

    That’s not to say she’s safe. As we’ve seen in the first two seasons, coincidence, fate, luck — whatever you want to call it — plays a major role in the battle between right versus wrong. Anything can happen to anyone, making for a tense first hour and what will undoubtedly be a fraught full season. And while “Fargo” is scary, the scares aren’t cheap — far from it. Rather than the “gotcha!” moments or gory abominations dominating studio horror franchises, what’s frightening in “Fargo” is a blend of good intentions and bad ideas escalating beyond control.

    Yet unlike many horror films, what keeps us coming back to “Fargo” is that Hawley’s stories are always focused more on the good in people than the bad. We’re not tuning in to see the carnage, but to see who can escape it. “I think deep down we all have something positive inside us, don’t you think?” Gloria Burgle tells her son during the opening episode. And other than perhaps one obtuse character, it’s evident in the 65-minute premiere that this is true. There’s something good in each and every one of these Minnesotans, and we see enough of it to inspire hope that “something positive” can carry them through the horrors that lie ahead.

    It’s a painful journey, but one that’s always proven rewarding. The first episode of Season 3 has given us no reason to think it won’t be worth the torment again.

    Grade: A-
    “Fargo” Season 3 premieres Wednesday, April 19 at 10 p.m. on FX.

    ‘Fargo’ Review: Season 3 Remains a Masterful Midwestern Drama, But You’ll See It in a Terrifying New Light
     
  13. rburly

    rburly This space for rent

    Location:
    Orlando
    ‘Fargo’ Season 3 Review: A Cunning and Carefully Crafted New (True) Story

    [​IMG]

    There’s been a backlash recently against binge watching TV shows and the loss of the episode, as streaming platforms allow us to consume television as a deluge. One of the best things to happen to popcorn TV, though, is that opportunity to watch episodes back to back, a formula which can cover up a multitude of sins as we get engrossed in the story. But the FX series Fargo, now in its third season, is a great example of an anti-binge watch. Its story structure is novelistic (creator Noah Hawley says frequently that he sees each season as a 10-hour movie), and episodes are chapters that build up to a finite conclusion rather than having their own focus or mini arcs. But Hawley’s attention to detail, and the importance he puts on each season’s color palette and the specificity of the references make Fargo a story best savored.

    Season 3 is a much more intimate approach to storytelling than the expansive war that defined Season 2. Though that season was excellent (high praise from someone who borderline hated Season 1), the show has always excelled in smaller character moments and nuance, especially as it distanced itself from the source material. While Season 1 followed the themes of the movie fairly closely, with some subversions, Season 2 found its own rhythm in a retro tale that was familiar in a Coen Brothers-esque way, but also refreshingly different. This time we’re in 2010, with no tangible connections to the other seasons other than the stark, wintry Minnesota landscape and a multitude of “ya knows,” but because of that, this season of Fargo feels like it could be the show’s best yet.

    [​IMG]
    Image via FX

    As in the past, the show has managed to cobble together an outstanding cast, the marquee performance of which is immediately Ewan McGregor as feuding brothers Ray and Emmitt Stussy (a parole officer and the Parking Lot King of Minnesota, respectively). McGregor plays each brother (who aren’t twins) distinctly. Prosthetics helps, but McGregor also carries each differently, giving them slightly different accents and movements. Yet Ray and Emmitt, though vastly different, are both almost immediately drawn into bad situations with dire consequences that they naively set into motion. It’s a theme we see play out over and over in Fargo, where ordinary people end up doing terrible things in an escalating fashion, getting accidentally involved with bad guys while trying to keep a level head and work their way out of it.

    The bad guy in Season 3 is V.M. Vargas (David Thewlis), a mysterious figure who pushes his way into Emmitt’s orbit thanks to a loan deal that turned into an unsuspecting partnership. With rotten teeth and a sickly smile, Vargas is a cunning and casually brutal figure, flanked by an oddly boyish international goon squad, Yuri and Memo (Goran Bogdan and Andy Yu), who help carry out his vicious acts. But there are also smaller moments of cruelty that work just as effectively, like when Emmitt’s right-hand man, Sy Feltz (Michael Stuhlbarg) insults Ray and then takes his frustrations out on Ray’s Corvette — a symbol, alongside a lucrative book of stamps Emmitt possesses, of their Biblical Jacob and Esau birthright switcheroo.

    But Ray has a right-hand woman of his own in Nikki Swango (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), one of his parolees who he’s also in a relationship with. Nikki only wants Ray to get what belongs to him, but Ray’s mistakes lead Carrie Coon’s Gloria Burgle to begin an investigation into a murder that will likely be their undoing. But there’s a surprising amount of heart that motivates both of the brothers and their (often far more capable) “sidekicks,” even though Fargo never misses an opportunity to play up the low-fi humor that permeates every interaction.

    [​IMG]
    Image via FX

    Season 3 is slow to start, but there’s a palpable sense of layering. The storytelling, the settings, the props, and the language used is all so deliberate that it is engrossing. There are great character moments like how Gloria feels she’s invisible because she can’t ever set off the motion sensor for automatic doors, or how Nikki is obsessed with bridge and sees it as her way to fame and fortune with Ray. More than anything, though, Fargo’s collection of stellar actors again this year makes every scene a delight to watch. Coon is staid and inscrutable, Winstead is electric and seductive, McGregor finds likability and venerability for this characters in ways we wouldn’t expect, and so forth. It’s a showcase that, matched with the show’s sly humor, produces exceptional television.

    Fargo has again found a way to change up its story while never straying far from its distinct tonal and visual aesthetic, and seemingly improves each year. Emotional connections to the characters may be a little slow to form this time around, which has always been a weak spot with the series (though they will often form later, as in the case with several of Season 2’s characters). But in a way, that distance is part of what Fargo is all about. The tagline for each season is always a joke — that this is a true story. It sets the stage to make viewers truly feel like observers, like we’ve snuck into a circus tent and now get to see a great show. Like Hawley’s other recent series Legion, there’s a very self-aware and theatrical aspect to it that relishes in the time that a TV show affords. The careful crafting of each scene threads together a deeply fascinating portrait of its characters that would suffer from the glossing-over of a binge watch. Fargo wants to you to look and listen carefully — and the reward for doing so is to get a peek at a story that takes place in a slowly-revealed but endlessly interesting world.

    Rating: ★★★★★ Excellent, don’t ya know.

    Fargo Season 3 premieres Wednesday, April 19th on FX.


    [​IMG]
    Image via FX

    [​IMG]
    Image via FX

    http://collider.com/fargo-season-3-review/#images
     
  14. Leviethan

    Leviethan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Looking forward to this. Carrie Coon :love::love::love:
     
    Vinyl Addict likes this.
  15. GodShifter

    GodShifter Forum Metal Expert®

    Location:
    Dallas, TX, USA
    I'm getting a little stressed over all these good tv shows coming on and my lack of time to keep up :sweating:
     
  16. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    That's what DVRs are for...
     
  17. GodShifter

    GodShifter Forum Metal Expert®

    Location:
    Dallas, TX, USA
    I can DVR to my heart's content but it doesn't mean I have time to watch any of it.
     
    noname74 and chacha like this.
  18. EVOLVIST

    EVOLVIST Forum Resident

    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    It's going to be super weird to see Carrie Coon in both Fargo and The Leftovers, both of which are airing at the same time.

    Come to think of it, I don't recall ever seeing an actor in two different high-profile shows that air like that.
     
  19. jpelg

    jpelg Active Member

    Location:
    The Elm City
    This looks great.

    Makes me want to try watching Season 2 again (which I just didn't get into at the start for some reason). Loved season 1.
     
  20. rburly

    rburly This space for rent

    Location:
    Orlando
    'Fargo' Season 3: TV Review

    The FX gem returns for a third delicious season under the masterful hand of Noah Hawley and starring Ewan McGregor and Carrie Coon.

    There is a quintessential Fargo moment in the first episode of the third installment of the FX series, when sexy parolee and competitive bridge player Nikki Swango looks at her balding, pot-bellied, stamp-obsessed, Corvette-driving boyfriend (and parole officer) Ray Stussy and says this: "We're a team, you and me. Simpatico, to the point of spooky."

    If you're obsessed with Noah Hawley's virtuoso reimagining of Fargo as a television series, then you'll know the key words from above are "competitive bridge player," "stamp-obsessed," "Corvette," "simpatico," "spooky" and, only to a slightly lesser extent, "Swango" and "Stussy."

    The details always matter in Fargo: the words and names and how they're pronounced; the visually adroit use of wide shots right before the cameras dive in to see what outside influence will try to unsettle the belief systems of the locals; the raucous, upbeat music and the stoic, placid people; the overall tone, which is a dance of the quirky with the folksy, almost always ending in the deadly. These are the trademark Fargo elements that crop up each season.

    It's all here. So, too, is the "Minnesota nice" philosophy being challenged by the intrusion of evil — a disruptive force crashing into people who not only fail to see it coming, but often don't have the worldview to fathom its very existence.

    All of these are typical of Fargo, from the original Coen brothers' movie in 1996 to the last two impressive television seasons from Hawley (who wrote the first two season-three episodes sent to critics for review, directed the first one, and just finished the mind-bending and sublime first season of Legion, also for FX).

    I feel the same simpatico kinship for Fargo that Nikki (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) expresses to Ray (Ewan McGregor) in that scene in the first episode.

    Much of what makes Fargo so special can be glimpsed in those first two episodes, and based on character description and the arc of this third season, I would bet the rest holds up quite nicely. I say this having ranked the show No. 1 in 2014 and No. 1 in 2015 on my year-end best television lists. There's something about this show that continually finds its way to greatness.

    Granted, Fargo's not for everybody. The tonal collision of quirky humor and often egregious and bloody violence is not just a miracle of balance that Hawley and company have been able to pull off twice before, it's a concoction that makes a lot of people uncomfortable, as is the intention. And yes, the accents are always there, still annoying some people all these years later for reasons best left to them.

    Getting just a mere two episodes isn't the problem that it normally would be when it comes to properly reviewing a series. Fargo loyalists are worried about spoilers anyway (not that I would drop any), and if two previous full seasons have taught us anything it's that, well, there will be a lot of unforeseen zigs and zags along the way.

    What remains interesting about Fargo is the unparalleled zeal Hawley has for telling a story that allows for outrageous serendipity, humorous misfortune, pathos, violence, both broad and nuanced comedy, a deep exploration of familial bonds, a love of language and its confusions, an interest in local traditions, a study of the fear of change and, of course, that aforementioned obsession with what happens when evil passes through (or bubbles up from within) smaller American towns with a tight-knit social fabric and certain niceties that locals cling to almost against their better judgment when facing it.

    That's a lot to cram into a series, even one that has 10 episodes. But Fargo is nothing if not ambitious (the first 10 minutes of brilliant weirdness in season two may never be equaled, but we'll see what the eight remaining episodes in season three conjure).

    This third installment opens with a bit of institutional injustice all the way from East Berlin in 1988 — which is, yes, very Fargo — then quickly moves forward to Minnesota in 2010 and the beginning of our story, which seems pretty simple.

    There are two brothers (both played by McGregor). Emmit Stussy is the "Parking Lot King of Minnesota," and his life is pretty sweet. He's handsome, rich, happy. A family man. And then there's the aforementioned Ray, slightly younger but older-looking. Ray is a bit more of a sad sack, have lived his life in the shadow of Emmit.

    When we meet them, it's the 25th wedding anniversary of Emmit and Stella (Linda Kash). Ray and girlfriend Nikki look like interlopers. Emmit's right-hand man, Sy (Michael Stuhlbarg), bluntly tells Ray that he has five minutes of face time with his brother.

    And here we get the first brick in whatever crazy house Fargo will eventually build this season: Years ago, depending on which brother is telling the story, Ray inherited some valuable stamps but traded them with Emmit for his red Corvette. And you know how that deal ended up for the both of them. Certain stamps are more valuable than cars, it turns out. Especially cars that age disgracefully, sound like they're going to die when you fire them up and smash easily.

    From there, well, you don't really want to know, other than Emmit and Sy borrowed money from a shadow group and now the mysterious V.M. Vargas (the hilariously toothy David Thewlis) is here not to collect so much as connect. And a super-stoner ex-con, beautifully named Maurice LeFay (Scoot McNairy), does a job for Ray that, like most jobs in the world of Fargo, goes sideways in a very bad way, pulling in recently divorced mother and chief of the Eden Valley Police force Gloria Burgle (Carrie Coon).

    Things are about to get complicated. And odd. After these two episodes, I wanted, immediately, a spinoff series for Thewlis, not just because I wanted to see him perform with those teeth but because he is, in almost every scene, riveting in the same way that Bokeem Woodbine was in season two.

    There are many more characters viewers will meet in future episodes as whatever nefarious thing that's happening in Minnesota (and probably Fargo the city, which is always the north star) reveals itself. With this cast, with this show's history and with Hawley on such a roll, the episodes can't come fast enough.

    There are two scenes that especially stand out in the second episode for their malleable and knowing use of dialogue. Thewlis, as V.M. Vargas (I'm hoping we get a revelation of what the initials are), is rolling into a barren Minnesota parking lot with a semi full of probably dangerous things, and the befuddled guard at the shack can't keep up with Vargas' British wit or smarts. He's trying to check the log book on who can get in the lot, and wonders if Vargas' car and the menacing black Peterbilt trailer snugly following it are together. Surveying the density before him, Vargas says drolly: "Surmise." When the guard is still befuddled, Vargas says, "Because we arrived together, we are together. (Pause). Surmise." Hawley, who is also a novelist, takes joy in the intricacies of language, and each season of Fargo stands out because of that.

    Shortly after the Vargas scene, McGregor as Emmit and Stuhlbarg as Sy are talking in what can best be described as that familiar Fargo patois. And you can sense that both actors are delighting in the precision of the words and how the "Minnesota nice" demeanor, in all its congenial circuitousness, hides actual clarity and intention in a conversation. Nothing is happening onscreen except for the talking, which is everything, and both actors are enjoying every spoken word.

    No series since HBO's Deadwood has been as instantly identifiable in its style of dialogue. And it's not just the locals talking around a subject because of the disturbing parts of its center. There's a bluntness characters use as well, like when one says in a moment of vulnerability, "I never killed anyone before," and the retort is: "Well, me neither. Life's a journey."

    The writing in each scene, from extended banter to declarative sentence, is utterly masterful. To disagree, as Nikki Swango says, would be "unfathomable pinheadery."

    Cast: Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coons, Marie Elizabeth Winstead, David Thewlis, Michael Stuhlbarg, Shea Whigham, Olivia Sandoval, Hamish Linklater, Goran Bogdan, Andy Yu, Linda Kash, Graham Verchere, Scoot McNairy
    Created, written and directed by: Noah Hawley
    Executive producers: Noah Hawley, Warren Littlefield, John Cameron, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
    Premieres: Wednesday, April 19, 10 p.m. ET/PT (FX)


    'Fargo' Season 3: TV Review
     
    Chris from Chicago likes this.
  21. Season 1 was great. Season 2 was even better. I can't wait
     
    GentleSenator likes this.
  22. tonyc

    tonyc Forum Resident

    I would rather see her in "Fargo" than a Season 2 of "BrainDead".

    I'm looking forward to next Wednesday.
     
  23. noname74

    noname74 RIP HMV Canada

    Location:
    Canada
    We should start a thread to see who has the highest number of unwatched hours of DVR material backlogged.
     
    GodShifter likes this.
  24. Vinyl Addict

    Vinyl Addict Forum Resident

    Location:
    MA

    Literally just finished episode 8 (been slowly watching season 2 over the last week or so).
    I think you should give it another shot. It's a great season, with quite a few bits of comic relief. Sometimes I don't think it's even intentional.
     
    jpelg and Chris from Chicago like this.
  25. jeffgt14

    jeffgt14 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN
    Season 2 definitely had to grow on me. The biggest thing I had to get over is the fact that Billy Bob Thornton wasn’t in it.
     
    Vinyl Addict likes this.

Share This Page