Final Curtain (the Visual Arts obituary thread)*

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by JozefK, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. BradOlson

    BradOlson Country/Christian Music Maven

  2. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Della Reese, ‘Touched by an Angel’ Star and R&B Singer, Dies at 86

    Della Reese, who segued from pop and jazz singing stardom in the ‘50s and ‘60s to a long career as a popular TV actress on "Touched by an Angel” and other shows, died Sunday night at her home in California. She was 86.

    “She was an incredible wife, mother, grandmother, friend, and pastor, as well as an award-winning actress and singer. Through her life and work she touched and inspired the lives of millions of people,” actress Roma Downey, Reese’s co-star on “Touched By an Angel,” said in a statement announcing Reese’s death. “She was a mother to me and I had the privilege of working with her side by side for so many years on ‘Touched by an Angel.’ I know heaven has a brand new angel this day. Della Reese will be forever in our hearts.”

    CBS, home of “Touched By an Angel,” also hailed Reese’s legacy as an entertainer who focused her career on uplifting her audience.

    “For nine years, we were privileged to have Della as part of the CBS family when she delivered encouragement and optimism to millions of viewers as Tess on ‘Touched By An Angel,’ ” CBS said. “We will forever cherish her warm embraces and generosity of spirit. She will be greatly missed. Another angel has gotten her wings.”

    Reared in gospel, Reese became a seductive, big-voiced secular music star with her No. 1 R&B and No. 2 pop hit “Don’t You Know” in 1959. The 45, her first single on RCA Records, was a ballad drawn from an aria from Puccini’s opera “La Boheme.”​
     
  3. JPagan

    JPagan Forum Resident

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    South Florida
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  4. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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  5. Ginger Ale

    Ginger Ale Well-Known Member

    Location:
    New York
    She was wonderful. I loved her in the funny, lighthearted 'Rage of Paris!'
     
  6. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Anthony Harvey, Film Director And Editor, Dies At 87

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    Anthony Harvey, an acclaimed film director and editor, died at his Water Mill home on Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 23.

    Born on June 3, 1930, in London, he was 87 years old. He took his last name from his stepfather, actor Morris Harvey.

    Mr. Harvey’s best known turn in the director’s chair was “The Lion in Winter,” a 1968 historical drama based on a play by James Goldman starring Peter O’Toole as King Henry II and Katharine Hepburn as Queen Eleanor. The film gleaned seven Academy Award nominations, including a Best Director nod for Mr. Harvey. Ms. Hepburn tied with Barbra Streisand for Best Actress, and Mr. Harvey accepted the Oscar on her behalf in her absence.

    He worked with Mr. Goldman again on “They Might Be Giants,” a 1971 film starring George C. Scott as a man in a psychiatric hospital who is convinced he is Sherlock Holmes.

    He directed Ms. Hepburn again in “The Glass Menagerie,” a 1973 television adaptation of the Tennessee Williams play. The film was well received, and the Directors Guild of America nominated Mr. Harvey for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television.

    Prior to his 1966 directorial debut, “Dutchman,” Mr. Harvey was better known as a film editor. His first feature film as editor was 1956’s “Private’s Progress.” He worked with Stanley Kubrick on “Dr. Strangelove.”

    Among his local work was directing readings of the plays “Dorothy Parker Gets The Last Word” and “Julia Wars” at Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor.

    He leaves behind no family.​
     
  7. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    There is a photo of him having a, ahem, spirited discussion with Kate about the line in the Lion that she didn't want to say, can't repeat or my comment will vanish. Harvey looks like he's on the rack.
     
  8. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
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  9. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Jim Nabors Dead at 87

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    Jim Nabors, who starred in the massive '60s hit, 'Gomer Pyle,' died Thursday.

    Nabors became famous as the bumbling mechanic on The Andy Griffith Show and then went on to do his own show, which ran for 5 years.

    He also appeared in movies, including "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" and "Cannonball Run II."

    He also was an accomplished singer, who recorded dozens of albums and scored 5 gold and 1 platinum records.

    One of his iconic songs is the staple of the Indy 500 ... "Back Home Again in Indiana." He last appeared at the race in 2014.
     
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  10. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    I loved Jim Nabors on the Lost Saucer show made by the Kroffts in the '70s. His co-star Ruth Buzzi was great too! Jim is the first out gay person I ever knew about (although I really didn't understand what that mean at that time). Respect! :cool:
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  11. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Peter Baldwin, Actor and Emmy-Winning TV Director, Dies at 86

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    Peter Baldwin, an actor turned prolific Emmy-winning TV director with credits including The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Sanford and Son, Murphy Brown and The Wonder Years, has died. He was 86.

    Baldwin died Sunday at his home in Pebble Beach, California, his son, Drew Baldwin, CEO of Tubefilter and creator and executive producer of the Streamy Awards, announced.

    A former actor and contract player at Paramount Pictures, Baldwin cut his teeth behind the camera in Italy when he served as an assistant director under the legendary Vittorio De Sica on Woman Times Seven (1967) and A Place for Lovers (1968), which he also co-wrote.

    After he returned to the U.S., producer Sheldon Leonard hired him to work on The Dick Van Dyke Show starting in 1964, launching his career as a TV director.

    Baldwin went on to call the shots on more than 500 episodes of American television, on shows including Gomer Pyle: USMC, The Andy Griffith Show, The Doris Day Show, The Partridge Family, The Brady Bunch, The Bob Newhart Show, Happy Days, Chico and the Man, The Love Boat, Carter Country, Benson, Family Ties, Webster, ALF, Full House, Family Matters, WKRP in Cincinnati, Dream On, Blossom and Sabrina, the Teenage Witch.

    Baldwin won his Emmy in 1989 for directing an episode of The Wonder Years. He was nominated again two years later for his work on that show and earlier was recognized for helming "Where There's Smoke, There's Rhoda," a great 1972 episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

    Baldwin also directed the Rodney Dangerfield comedy feature Meet Wally Sparks (1997) and produced the 1986 HBO movie As Summers Die, starring Bette Davis, Jamie Lee Curtis and Scott Glenn.

    Peter DuBois Baldwin was born Jan. 11, 1931, in Winnetka, Illinois, where he attended New Trier High School. During his senior year at Stanford University, he was discovered by a talent scout and signed by Paramount as one of its "Golden Circle" of newcomers, which at one time included William Holden, Patricia Morison, Susan Hayward and Robert Preston.

    Baldwin then appeared in Billy Wilder's Stalag 17 (1953) — his character is shot by waiting guards as he and another prisoner emerge from a tunnel at the beginning of the movie — George Seaton's Little Boy Lost (1953) and Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments (1956).

    After serving three years in the U.S. Navy as an air intelligence officer, Baldwin returned to Hollywood and was in Anthony Mann’s The Tin Star (1957) opposite Henry Fonda and Anthony Perkins, in Seaton’s Teacher’s Pet (1958), starring Clark Gable and Doris Day, and in the sci-fi cult classic I Married a Monster From Outer Space (1958).

    Baldwin starred alongside Julie Harris on a national tour of the Broadway play The Warm Peninsula in 1958, then headed to Italy for starring roles in Roberto Rossellini’s Escape by Night (1960), Dino Risi’s Love in Rome (1960) and Francesco Rosi’s The Mattei Affair (1972).

    He wrote, produced and co-directed Some Sort of Cage (1963), a docudrama about the Santa Monica rehab facility Synanon House that won first prize at the Venice Film Festival.

    After he retired, Baldwin moved to Pebble Beach and served as a board member of the Monterey Bay Stanford Club, commodore and secretary of the Stillwater Yacht Club and on the board of directors of the Pacific Repertory Theatre in Carmel-by-the-Sea.

    Baldwin was a rabid Chicago Cubs fan, and when his team finally won the World Series last year, he said, "I waited 85 years for this moment."

    In addition to his son, survivors include his wife, Terry; daughters Amy and Eleonora; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.​
     
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  12. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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  13. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    RIP: Bruce Brown, 1937-2017

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    Bruce Brown, longtime surf filmmaker and director of the seminal “Endless Summer” just passed at 80 years old.

    Prior to 1964, the media saw surfers as rebellious thugs, and Hollywood made them out to be a bunch of idiots. Filmmaker Bruce Brown single-handedly changed that with The Endless Summer. It portrayed the wave as a kind of Holy Grail and surfers as knights on a quest. In one stroke, he replaced Hollywood's buffoonery with the popular mythology that endures today.

    The Endless Summer was Brown's sixth surfing film in a career that started almost accidentally and proceeded according to the guerrilla template of the times -- shoot all winter, edit in the spring, run your ass off all summer showing the damn thing (including doing your own live narration) in school auditoriums and small halls, then pack up for another winter on the road and do it all over again. With The Endless Summer, Brown broke that mold.​

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  14. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    RIP Bruce.
    This movie was an anomaly in our house. The old man hated kid, their long hair, and their stupid ideas when they didn't even work. But for some reason, he loved this movie. He had no interest in watching surfing on tv or on the beach, but he was fascinated by this movie and watched it many times. Which meant that I saw it a lot, too; and I loved it as well.

    And what a poster! wow.
     
  15. smilin ed

    smilin ed Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham
    Seem to remember that in the switch to colour TV in the UK, this was played frequently because it looked so good in colour - or my memory is playing tricks, but I swear I saw it often when I was a a kid and, such is the nature of TV's relationship with films, I don't think it's been shown at all in recent times.
     
  16. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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    New Hampshire
  17. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

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  18. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Martin Ransohoff, Filmways Founder and ‘Cincinnati Kid’ Producer, Dies at 90

    Martin Ransohoff, who produced notable films of the 1960s and ’70s such as “The Cincinnati Kid” and “Save the Tiger” and co-founded FilmwaysTelevision, died Wednesday at his home in Bel-Air,Calif. He was 90.

    Filmways produced some of the biggest TV hits of the 1960s including “The Beverly Hillbillies,” “The Addams Family,” “Petticoat Junction,” “Green Acres” and “The Hollywood Squares.”

    Ransohoff later entered the movie business along with Filmways’ executive John Calley. Their first film was 1962’s “Boys’ Night Out,” followed by 1963’s “The Wheeler Dealers.” He also was behind the 1965 New Orleans-set drama, “The Cincinnati Kid,” which starred Steve McQueen, Edward G. Robinson, Ann-Margret, and Karl Malden. Ransohoff famously fired Sam Peckinpah from the film, feeling his vision was too dark, and hired Norman Jewison to direct.

    He exited the company in 1972 to become an independent film producer.

    Among his producing credits were Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s “The Sandpiper,” Tony Richardson’s “Hamlet,” “Catch-22,” “Ice Station Zebra,” “The Americanization of Emily,” “Ice Station Zebra” and “Silver Streak.”

    1973’s “Save the Tiger,” written by Steve Shagan and starring Jack Lemmon and Jack Gilford, earned two Oscar nominations and one win for Lemmon. He continued producing into the 1980s, with 1985’s Glenn Close-Jeff Bridges starrer “Jagged Edge” landing an Oscar nom for Robert Loggia.

    Ransohoff’s own acting endeavor consisted of an uncredited role in 1965’s “The Loved One,” which was produced by Filmways.

    The producer was also known for launching Sharon Tate’s acting career. She played the bank secretary on “The Beverly Hillbillies” before being cast by director Roman Polanski in the Ransohoff-produced “The Fearless Vampire Killers.” Ransohoff introduced her to Polanski, and the two were married in January 1968. Less than two years later, she was murdered at age 26 in her L.A. home by members of the Manson family.

    Born in New Orleans, Ransohoff secured a degree from Colgate University in 1949. Upon graduation, he worked in advertising at Young & Rubicam in New York before getting his start in television.

    He co-founded Filmways, a television and film production company, with Ed Kasper in 1952. When he was in his early 30s, Ransohoff became one of the youngest men to take an entertainment company public in 1958.

    Ransohoff is survived by his wife Joan Marie; sons Peter, Kurt, and Steve; stepdaughter Erica; stepson Steve; and 10 grandchildren. He was pre-deceased by a daughter, Karen.​

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  19. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Scooby-Doo actress Heather North dies at 71 | Daily Mail Online

    Heather North has died at the age of 71 in Studio City, California after suffering from a long illness.

    The blonde actress was best known for voicing the character of attractive young sleuth Daphne Blake on the popular animated TV series Scooby-Doo.

    North had time in front of the camera as well as she starred on the TV shows Love American Style, Adam-12 and Days Of Our Lives.

    She passed away on November 30 surrounded by family, her friend Jodie Mann told The Hollywood Reporter.

    The star first voiced Daphne in 1970 during the second season of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!

    Then in 1972 and 1973 she worked on The New Scooby-Doo Movies.

    She continued to voice Daphne through the many spinoffs and specials, like 1979's Scooby-Doo Goes Hollywood and 1984's The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries.

    Her last Scooby-Doo job was in 2003 with Scooby-Doo And The Monster Of Mexico.​

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  20. Wingman

    Wingman Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Europe
    Bob Givens. The man who designed Bugs Bunny. 99 years young. May he rest in peace.

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  21. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    Sacrilege! Everyone knows Bob Clampett did it all!:sigh:
     
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  22. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    "This has been a Filmways presentation, Darling."
     
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  23. Wingman

    Wingman Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Europe
    Took all the credit, you mean.
     
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  24. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    ‘Sound of Music’ Actress Heather Menzies-Urich Dies at 68

    Actress Heather Menzies-Urich, best known for portraying Louisa von Trapp in the 1965 film “The Sound of Music,” died Sunday night in Frankford, Ontario. She was 68.

    Menzies-Urich, the widow of actor Robert Urich, had been recently diagnosed with cancer, according to her son Ryan Urich.

    Urich said his mother died on Christmas Eve, surrounded by her children and family members.

    “She was an actress, a ballerina and loved living her life to the fullest,” Urich said. “She was not in any pain but, nearly four weeks after her diagnosis of terminal brain cancer, she had enough and took her last breath on this earth at 7:22 pm.”

    Born in Toronto, Menzies-Urich’s first screen credit came in the TV series “The Farmer’s Daughter” in 1964. She was then cast as the third-oldest of the seven von Trapp children in “The Sound of Music.” The film adaptation of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical was a box office smash that won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

    Ted Chapin, president and chief creative officer of the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization, praised Menzies-Urich’s efforts to keep the movie fresh for new generations.

    “Heather was part of ‘the family.’ There is really no other way to describe the members of the cast of the movie of ‘The Sound of Music.’ And of ‘the kids,’ Heather was a cheerful and positive member of the group, always hoping for the next gathering,” Chapin said. “We are all lucky to have known her, and she will happily live on in that beautiful movie. We will miss her.”​

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    Kym Karath, who played Gretl, tweeted, “I am filled with infinite sadness.”
     
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  25. Platterpus

    Platterpus Forum Resident

    Location:
    MPLS
    I just watched The Sound of Music a few days ago. What a beautiful lady. RIP.
     
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