Lindisfarne.

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Sgt Pepper, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. Billo

    Billo Forum Resident

    Location:
    Southern England
    yes I do have it - with the odd cover of a weird looking bus passenger !

    a fine album with a more 'big band' feel about them, Ray Laidlaw plays drums

    a few tracks - remixed in the case of 'Corporation Rock' - are later reused on Hull's 'Phantoms' solo album also released on Rocket Records

    'Make Me Want To Stay' also features, and of course also then has a Lindisfarne version on 'Back and Forth'
     
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  2. Randoms

    Randoms Forum Resident

    Location:
    UK
    I've seen Lindisfarne, a couple of times, and they were excellent.

    Love the studio albums, but will also say that, Magic In The Air, is a stunning, live album. Recorded on home ground, at Newcastle City Hall, December 1977, the playing, recording and atmosphere are excellent. I think it is safe to assume, that there was barely, a dry mouth, in the house! :cheers:
     
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  3. duggan

    duggan Forum Resident

    Location:
    sydney
    What compilations, ideally covering Run To Home period, can be recommended for content and sound quality?
     
  4. Nick Dunning

    Nick Dunning Forum Resident

    I was driving the twenty or so miles home through the Sussex countryside very late one night in November 1995 listening to John Peel on the radio.

    He announced Hully had passed away and played 'United States Of Mind' from 'Pipedream'.

    Gutted. At his best he was the equal of anyone as a songwriter. Gone too soon.
     
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  5. carlwm

    carlwm Well-Known Member

    Location:
    wales

    I think that C'mon Everybody gets a bad rap because it had an appalling cover and terrible advertising campaign. It's not essential but if you want to hear a great band play attack some rock and roll songs with gusto (and I can happily accept you want to hear nothing of the sort) then it's perfectly fine. The Fairport family got nothing like the grief for their "Bunch" project.

    As Bilbo suggests, Ray Jackson is a complex character, who, no doubt believes what he says, but has a slightly skewed view of reality. That said, he's a wonderful musician & songwriter who was the catalyst for the band's current incarnation. His early 80s solo record, In The Night is, I think undervalued by Lindisfarne fans because it's essentially, a pop record.

    The Lindisfarne Story is a wonderful night out with a real lump-in-throat finale. Well worth catching if they bring it to your town.

    Not surprised that Mr Hull creamed it at the pub quiz. The man had a head like a shed. Full of the most obscure but somehow relevant esoteric knowledge to suit any occasion!
     
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  6. carlwm

    carlwm Well-Known Member

    Location:
    wales

    Cheers Bilbo, thoroughly enjoying your Lindifarne memories!

    As you remembered, Jack The Lad had a fourth (their third) album called Rough Diamonds - the cover deigned by one Ray Jackson!

    I also, very fortuitously, caught the tour with The Strawbs (a very fancy bar stage design, as I remember). I was visiting family in Swansea with wife, & we popped into a town centre bar (The Builder's Arms, for anyone who knows Swansea) where - unbelievably - we spotted Lindisfarne playing cards, a table or two away. I - eventually - plucked up the courage to say hello, get some autographs & ask them what they were doing in Swansea and it turns out they were playing a gig in the local theatre. Alan asked why we weren't going so we told him we were just visiting town & didn't realise they were playing. He told us the gig was sold out but give him a minute & he'd sort something out. He came back a few moments later & told us that he'd persuaded the theatre manager to let us stand at the back of the theatre for the duration of the show as his guests. Extraordinary! Not only that, but at the end of the show the band came & sat with us for a while in the venue bar to see how much we'd enjoyed it.

    They say "don't meet your heroes but Lindifarne - & Alan Hull, in particular, were real gentlemen that night.
     
  7. notesofachord

    notesofachord Forum Resident

    Location:
    Utah's Dixie
    Of all of the albums I've newly heard in the past five years or so, Nicely Out of Tune is in my top five. In fact, it's one of my most-played albums of said period.
     
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  8. Black Elk

    Black Elk Music Lover

    Location:
    Bay Area, U.S.A.
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  9. Billo

    Billo Forum Resident

    Location:
    Southern England
    I recall that bar set up onstage - they even had a barman polishing glasses during their set - he brought them all a well earned pint at the end and 'called time' !

    right 'part 2' for anyone 'new' to Lindisfarne or old fogies like me reliving fast fading memories...!

    After the demise of 'mark 2' and later Jack The Lad Alan Hull and Ray Laidlaw formed 'Radiator' a big band sounding harder edged outfit who made an interesting album on Rocket Records which included 'Corporation Rock' a bitter attack on the 'musak' industry - where Alan Hull so accurately observed;

    '....you need IRON in your soul...'
    (a line that always makes me think of Badfinger - and several Rock music figures since...)

    several tracks from this Radiator album including 'Corporation Rock' (remixed a bit) were later used on Alan's 1979 third solo album 'Phantoms' on Rocket.

    The 'classic' line up of Lindisfarne reunited initially for a 'one off' show in their hometown Newcastle in 1976 but demand proved to be so great they ended up doing more concerts and a full reunion took place for 1978 album 'Back And Forth' issued in the UK on Mercury records

    Legendary producer Gus Dudgeon handled this comeback album and spotted Alan's song 'Run For Home' - 'there's your single' he said and he was right as it soared into the UK top ten , with 'Juke Box Gipsy' a minor UK chart hit too

    the album was more electric in feel than in the early seventies with a 'rockier' more polished edge but the trademark harmonica and tight vocal harmonies were still in place as they 'modernised' but retained their very individualistic sound with more piano featured - some criticised it production wise as 'too American' (?) but it sounded pure Lindisfarne with Alan and Jacka handling lead vocals - Hull's 'Marshall Riley's Army' (re a famous March led by a local politician) had the all too true telling line;

    '...and now forty years have passed but your still down there if your working class...'

    Ray Jackson and 'mark 2' member Charlie Harcourt teamed up to write three songs notably 'Warm Feeling', and 'Kings Cross Blues'

    there were some very nostalgic sounding songs too - 'Angels At Eleven' and a Lindisfarne version of Hull's earlier heart rending song 'Make Me Want To Stay' closed the set well

    while Si Cowe contributed a co-write 'B' side 'Stick Together' later added as a bonus CD track calling for racial unity - which would probably get banned today (how ironic is that ?)

    renewed wider public interest saw the band back on UK TV with Scottish Grampian TV giving them a half hour set on 'The Entertainers' (my old ex-Beta VHS copy is pretty knackered now !)

    the live double album 'Magic in The Air' on Mercury was a superb live concert album doing them full justice unlike the early 73 set LP had been

    both Alan Hull ('Phantoms' - 1979) and just before Ray Jackson ('In The Night' - Mercury records) released fine solo albums - indeed ALL of the members various solo albums are worth grabbing if you spot them - some are hard to find now


    sadly the next studio album 'The News' (1979) flopped as did a lovely single 'Easy and Free' as public interest seemed to wane besides their devoted fanbase even tho' it was a pretty decent set of original songs if perhaps not quite up to the strength overall of 'Back and Fourth' (arguable) - tho' 'People Say', 'Log On Your Fire', 'Glad To Be Here ?', 'Miracles', and 'Call of The Wild' were certainly all fine songs

    Si Cowe contributed 'Dedicated Hound' a cynical song sung by Jacka which had a telling lyric re some (not all) pop music critics (who mostly loathed and routinely dismissed the band)

    'I Don't Need to hear your guitar... I'll write my review from the bar...'

    again both Rod Clements and Ray Jackson also provided songs, while Jacka took a really moving reflective lead vocal on Alan's song 'Evening'

    Sadly tho' not surprisingly Mercury dropped Lindisfarne after this and they continued touring, next forming their own label LMP for 'Sleepless Nights' in 1982 which again saw Alan Hull dominating the songs with the warnings; 'Cruising To Disaster', 'Stormy Weather' and in complete contrast for Jacka in concerts the memorable 'I Must Stop Going To Parties' (tho' sung by Alan on the album) while Rod Clements provided 'Sunderland Boys'

    it wasn't all dire warnings or party songs however, Hull's heartfelt 'You Don't Miss The Water (Till The Well Runs Dry)' was a lovely lament most could identify with...

    again the album had a more electric rockier style but was recognisably Lindisfarne - 'Winning The Game' had notable sax work, 'Same Way Down' was a driving electric rocker and the very nostalgic feeling 'Nights' later took on a life of it's own - when power failed during a show the guys quickly outdid 'The Flying Pickets' and formed the vocal only group onstage;
    'The Geordinaires' ! (featuring Rod and Ray on bass vocals, Alan and Si doing the tenor harmonies, Jacka singing lead...)

    anything The Beach Boys and Four Seasons could do...so could Lindisfarne

    so popular proved this vocal only version they later put it out as a single

    by the next studio album in 1979 there had been a significant development that would prove important - perhaps without the members themselves knowing at the time just how much so as the "group" actually began to "prepare itself" for the future...

    more in part 3...
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
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  10. carlwm

    carlwm Well-Known Member

    Location:
    wales
    Realised I had a bit of a senior moment in a previous post. The current Lindisfarne drummer is Paul Thompson not that other great sticksman Paul Burgess.

    Mea Culpa.
     
  11. carlwm

    carlwm Well-Known Member

    Location:
    wales
    Strangely enough, I prefer The News to Back and Fourth. No slight on the latter because it's brilliant but somehow The News just resonates a little bit more. Maybe it because of its looser, more organic sound.

    I had trouble finding Sleepless Nights as a teenager despite my local radio station playing I Must Stop Going To Parties on practically every show for a while. Neither of the record shops in the vicinity would stock it because off its "controversial" cover. Ah, innocent days! Didn't get it until the band play live locally about a year later.

    Worth the wait, though!
     
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  12. Billo

    Billo Forum Resident

    Location:
    Southern England
    Sorry that should read the next studio album in 1986 (not 1979) !

    I too think 'The News' is a great album - and 'Easy and Free' was a fine single, no idea why both failed to chart....
     
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  13. smilin ed

    smilin ed Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham
    Thanks for all this. Happy days!
     
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  14. thematinggame

    thematinggame Forum Resident

    Location:
    Germany
    I consider Alan Hull one of the best English songwriters from this period , my favourite Lindisfarne album is Dingly Dell.
    I also like Pipedream and Squire very much , later solo albums such as Back to basics and Statues and liberties are not bad either .
    At the time of its release I wasn't to happy with Roll on Ruby (when the band split into L. and Jack the Lad) but have learned to like it in the meantime, also the follow-up Happy Daze (which so far has not been mentioned yet) is quite good,too, there is also a live cd (Live at the Hippodrome 1974) with this line-up which I can also recommend.
    I was not too keen on the reformed Lindisfarne, although Run for home is an excellent song.
    And Magic in the air( from 1977) is a wonderful live album, which captures the spirit of their legendary Xmas shows in Newcastle very well.
    About 10-15 years ago I was lucky to see the band with Alan's stepson (+ Rod Clements,Ray Laidlaw and Marty Craggs) in a small church during the Broadstairs Folk Festivals , one of the best concerts I have ever attended.
    Happy days indeed.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
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  15. Classicrock

    Classicrock Forum Resident

    Location:
    South West, UK.
    I saw them on the News tour and the new songs didn't gel in concert. I didn't buy the album at the time and only acquired a used vinyl copy around 2000. Turns out it is nearly as good as Back And Forth. One of the greatest live bands ever. Unfortunately they became something of a tribute act after Allan's passing. The post Hull line up did do one really excellent album 'Promenade' in 2002 shortly before disbanding. This was co-written and produced by Nigel Stonier now musical partner and husband of Thea Gilmore. I was disappointed that Jacka left after restarting the band a few years ago. Would love to see the 3 surviving original members in a more credible version of the band. Ray Jackson was the heart of that band being front man, master of ceremonies, and providing the distinctive mandolin and harmonica elements. I think he is rather torn between music and his art business. A very talented painter and bus fanatic. He has also appeared as part of folk 'supergroup' 'Gathering' featuring Gerry Donahue, Rick Kemp and Clive Bunker.
     
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  16. thematinggame

    thematinggame Forum Resident

    Location:
    Germany
    There is a 3 cd box called The Charisma Years 1970-73 (including the first 4 studio albums and the Live album) which is probably the best introduction to the band (also quite cheap at around € 10-€15) . The artwork is pretty awful though and as a fan you really want the original albums at some time.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
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  17. Classicrock

    Classicrock Forum Resident

    Location:
    South West, UK.
    The 'bad' graphic used for the cover is a repro of the USA version of Nicely Out Of Tune.
     
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  18. Billo

    Billo Forum Resident

    Location:
    Southern England
    Someone asked if there is a good overview 'Best of...'

    'The Best of Lindisfarne' (2005) - with a ship going under the bridge on the cover - 19 songs - has most key tracks from 'Lady Eleanor' to 'Run For Home' plus two nice ones with the post Hull line up
    - 'Can't Do Right For Doing Wrong' and 'Ghost in Blue Suede Shoes' sung by Billy Mitchell

    another purely with Alan Hull and a sprinkling of notable later tracks from 1978 onwards (I think - my copy is currently with a lady !!) is
    'Lindisfarne - On Tap'

    sound on both of these is pretty decent to my untrained ears

    also 'Access All Areas' - Lindisfarne gives you a CD and a DVD of great songs with Alan Hull and Ray Jackson line up

    'Happy Daze' is indeed a great album with Alan's 'Tonight', 'River' and Tommy Duffy's 'Juiced Up To Lose' three of my fav tracks
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
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  19. Byrdsmaniac

    Byrdsmaniac Well-Known Member

    In liked the first two albums. Lady Eleanor, Meet Me on the Corner, Winter Song, and Clear White Light are favorite songs.

    I also like the first Jack the Lad album, It’s Jack the Lad quite a bit; maybe even more than either of the Lindisfarne records. Jack the Lad was started by three of the original members of Lindisfarne.
     
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  20. Siegmund

    Siegmund Forum Resident

    Location:
    England, UK
    Never saw Lindisfarne but did see a solo gig by Hull in 1988. He wasn't that impressive, tbh, and was obviously bored with his classic songs (he sent up the ending of Lady Eleanor, effectively taking the piss out of it).

    I got him to sign my vinyl copy of Pipedream, This album seems more and more impressive as the years pass.
     
  21. smilin ed

    smilin ed Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham
    Yup. I would too - and there are enough people who have worked with them on and off for ages (Billy Mitchell, for example) to come up with an impressive line-up. I'd like to see an album from them, though. As I mentioned above, Hull's son (stepson?) was working on some of his dad's unfinished songs, so there's a start - and we'll have whatever Jackson, Clements and Laidlaw bring to the table. I kind of hoped that when Si Cowe died, it might have sparked something like that - selfish, I know...
     
  22. Classicrock

    Classicrock Forum Resident

    Location:
    South West, UK.
    If you are referring to Dave Hull Denholm he is Allan Hull's son in law?
     
  23. smilin ed

    smilin ed Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham
    Maybe that's it
     
  24. gilbert green

    gilbert green Forum Resident

    As every Lindisfarne fan knows, Alan Hull was one of England's best ever songwriters.
     
  25. smilin ed

    smilin ed Forum Resident

    Location:
    Durham
    Here's Alan in a clip from a play written by the great poet Tom Pickard:

     
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