Listenin' to Jazz and Conversation

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Lonson, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    I've not been to Tokyo but I lived on the Gulf Coast (U.S.) for six years and it was similar. Summers were typically high 90s with humidity runnng between 90 - 98 % when it wasn't raining. I really didn't like it. It's been 100 F for the last two days and today will be another before it is projected to "cool down" tomorrow to 90 F. It is very dry here in Northern California which is a big plus in the summer. It is the hottest summer I can remember in my 35 years here although the weatherman said it was worse one year in the 1970s.

    NP Kai Winding & Curtis Fuller - Giant 'Bones' 80 (Sonet)
    With the Horace Parlan, Mads Vinding and Ed Thigpen rhythm section. Recorded in 1979.
     
  2. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    I did a similar thing with Trane. I bought his Live At Birdland on Impulse first but I couldn't really hang with it much so I decided to do what you did and start with the Prestige titles and worked through his discography and worked my way through Prestige to Atlantic and Impulse. It felt more natural to explore Coltrane's growth as he himself did and by the time I got to Impulse the Birdland album was easier to follow.
     
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  3. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    I've never fully found my way into the work of Julius Hemphill. Some of it, like the WSQ stuff and some of the later sextet stuff, I really like, even love, some of it like Blue Boye I've tried and tried to enter and haven't found a way into.

    But I've been listening to Dogon A.D. lately -- the 2011 CD reissue that including "The Hard Blues," which was cut at the same session but wound up on Coon Bidness, with the replica of the original self-produced album cover -- and boy, not only am I loving it, but given it's time (1972) and it's place (St. Louis), it's like a missing link between the AACM and earlier free jazz and later in the tradition stuff (now that "The Hard Blues" has been restored to a place it seems like it always belonged) and kind of loft jazz stuff. Really quite the album, and especially in this expanded edition it feels like a complete statement. (In fact, if I had been sequencing the record in '72 and had to leave something off for time, I might just have put "Dogon A.D." on the A-side and "The Hard Blues" on the B-side.)

    And I've also been digging Vijay Iyer's cover of the title track. It's a weird piece that, unless I'm mishearing the herky jerkiness, seems to have some kind of multimetric thing going on between the cello, lead instruments and drums, that I have a hard time puzzling out the meters so it's interesting to hear how easy Iyer's trio makes that seem to play.

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. alankin1

    alankin1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philly
    Mike Reed's People, Places & Things – About Us (482 Music)
    — Greg Ward (alto saxophone), Tim Haldeman (tenor saxophone), Jason Roebke (bass), Mike Reed (drums) with David Boykin (tenor saxophone), Jeb Bishop (trombone), Jeff Parker (guitar)

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. The East Asian Monsoon moves across Japan in mid-June bringing a marked increase in rainfall and humidity. Only this year the rainy season has been very short and not very wet in the Tokyo region. Contrast that with the western island of Kyushu where 1/2 a metre of rain fell in 24 hours (!) leading to widespread flooding and landslides which claimed 25 lives. It's mid 90's daily here and the worst of the humidity is yet to come. August is hotter. There's no daylight savings time in Japan which means the sun rises at 4:30 am this time of year so it's stinking hot by the time you step outside. Those people coming here for the 2020 Olympics are in for a shock.. Tokyo is much like Singapore in summer. Locals tell me Osaka and Kyoto are even hotter..
    The cicadas are already putting in an appearance, 3 weeks earlier than usual. Japanese cicadas are LOUD. This is the time of year when I long for England's green and pleasant land (though I see it's been stinking hot over there this summer). :shake:

    Herbie Mann's Stone Flute helped soothe things earlier but I'm in for another restless night..:sweating:
     
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  6. fatwad666

    fatwad666 Active Member

    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    Does anyone know if there are any affordable copies of this Dogon A.D. CD available for purchase anywhere? I learned about it from this forum and have been actively searching with no luck. (My assumption is that that is just the sad reality of the situation and I will need to accept it!)
     
  7. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    Sounds like everyone has a different way into Coltrane's music. For me, the Coltrane Atlantic stuff is probably the stuff I listen to least. Trane with Miles, listen to that a lot, the Miles '50s quintet is easily my favorite Miles band; Trane with Monk, some of my favorite, Trane -- his reading of "Ruby My Dear" is probably my favorite recording of my favorite Monk song, and Trane's '57 "Trinkle Tinkle" solo is to me the moment where you can hear Trane kind of becoming the John Coltrane that we know in his maturity, probably my favorite Trane solo. Hard bop Trane, not my favorite, but I still sometimes return to Blue Train, but this is kind of a period where my excitement about the material wanes and I almost never return to any of the stuff between that and the emergence of the classic quartet on the '61 Vanguard recordings (and those are my favorite Coltrane recordings, the '61 Vanguard stuff). Not that I have anything against that stuff, nor fail to appreciate the importance of Giant Steps in particular (and of course the material on Giant Steps is probably Coltrane's most important work as a composer), but I've never had any kind of emotional connection to that material.

    To me the early classic quartet stuff is the sweet spot -- the Vanguard material (including the stuff with with the expanded group and Dolphy), Impressions, Live at Birdland, A Love Supreme. That's really the stuff I love most from Coltrane. I can't remember when I first heard Coltrane. His playing was always just there via Kind of Blue and the Monk stuff and the ubiquity of Giant Steps and My Favorite Things. But it was that classic quartet 61- A Love Supreme recorded in Dec. '64, that I really fell in love with and return to. (Good lord, that cadenza on "I Want to Talk About You" from Live a Birdland, maybe my second favorite Trane solo after "Trinkle Tinkle").

    I like some of the later stuff too -- especially Meditations and the duets with Rashied Ali.
     
  8. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    It was a limited edition and its OOP, I actually ponied up almost $50 for a copy but there's a two-LP vinyl edition still available new on Amazon for $57, so I figured I was actually getting a good price on the edition I wanted -- a portable one.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
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  9. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    Sonny Red with Grant Green and Barry Harris - The Mode (Jazzland) orange stereo label.

    Cedar Walton, George Tucker and Jimmy Cobb are the rhythm section. Recorded in 1961.
     
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  10. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    If the $50 copy is from International Phonograph then I can say it is a great reissue from packaging to sonics. Yes it's pricey but relative to other reissues you get what you pay for. Highly recommended.
     
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  11. jkm

    jkm The Medium is the Massage

    Location:
    Vancouver, CANADA
    The International Phonograph web site doesn't show anything forthcoming. I know how important it is to grab those releases quickly and I do before I've even listened to samples now.
     
  12. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    Yeah, that's the one. I thought about just picking up the LP new at $57, buy I really wanted to be able to easily play it in the car and I found a new copy fron a eBay seller for $45 plus shipping, so that was actually cheaper than the new LP. More commonly you see the OOP CD listed at least for more like $100.
     
  13. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    Ike Quebec - Heavy Soul (Blue Note) NY mono pressing
     
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  14. Tribute

    Tribute Forum Resident

    When I listen to music, I often find myself hearing (in my head) a different version than the recording itself. Different lead singer (bass to soprano), different musical arrangement, different instruments, the vocal performed on violin or saxophone or some other instrument, or an instrumental performed as a song, different tempos, often different lyrics, maybe an a cappella performance....

    The better the performer/singer on the original recording, the more my imagination runs with hearing something very different altogether. What I hear differs on each listening.

    I do this all the time. Preferably in the dark with no other distractions.
     
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  15. Tribute

    Tribute Forum Resident

    I got that not too long after it was released. It was my first jazz LP by someone I had never heard of before. The cover drew me in and the song "Nature Boy" on the record made me buy it. It is one of those records that made me learn at a young age to buy music that I had never heard of before.
     
  16. You've reminded me of some of my favourite Trane moments. Really love his stuff with Monk, (and 'Ruby, My Dear' was my favourite Monk composition when I first got into Monk, though I prefer Monk's Blue Note version over all the others.) But, yeah, Coltrane on 'Trinkle, Tinkle' moves mountains.
    The first couple of Prestige albums are a great introduction particularly Lush Life- that pleading intro to the title track was one of my earliest memories of the man, and probably the moment I was hooked, along with his playing on Kind Of Blue. The Prestige material tends to get a little samey for me after that.
    I find Giant Steps is where everything coalesces- the playing, the sound, the compositions and the emotional content. For me it has just as much emotional pull as A Love Supreme- that extended solo on 'Countdown' is joyous.

    (Confession time, My Favourite Things has always been a colossal bore to me, never seen the attraction. Definitely a candidate for Woody Allen's 'Academy of the Over-rated'.)

    I probably play the Impulse! material more than anything else, since I find such depth there and more to listen for with repeated playing. There are countless riches if you only get The Complete Quartet and Village Vanguard box sets. But like Miles, ' beginning, middle and end' I need it all.
     
  17. I don't think I ever get that while I'm listening. Intriguing...
     
  18. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    NP Thad Jones - (Debut) remastered lp from 1991 by Phil De Lancie

    From 1954, it is created from two sessions with two groups with Kenny Clarke/Maz Roach, Hank Jones/John Dennis, Frank Wess and Charles Mingus, the latter being the sole member in both sessions besdes Thad. Sessions were recorded in 1954 and 1955.
     
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  19. Six String

    Six String Forum Resident

    Re:Coltrane's discography, I would agree that some of the Prestige titles can be a little samey sounding but I enjoy the relaxed grooves played with the Red Garland Trio. They work for me when my brain is a little tired and I'm not ready for the intensity of some of the Impulse dates. There are a few titles on Atlantic and Impulse that would fit that bill as well. I have noticed that in the last five or six years I find myself playing the Atlantic albums more. Having said that, A Love Supreme is one of my favorite Trane albums.
     
  20. Lonson

    Lonson Don't get around much anymore Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chardon, Ohio
    New Japanese reissue.
    [​IMG]
     
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  21. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    I like the Blue Note version, which I actually played as a pianist learning Monk solos from transcriptions before I heard it; I also love the solo version on Alone in SF; and the '57 version not with Trane "singing" the lead but with Coleman Hawkins too. Pretty much just love that one, including the great middle 8 which always puts me in mind of one of those Monk rules Steve Lacy wrote down: "THE INSIDE OF THE TUNE (THE BRIDGE) IS THE PART THAT MAKES THE OUTSIDE SOUND GOOD," not that the A section of the tune needs any help in sounding beautiful.
     
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  22. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    I actually feel like sometimes the classic quartet stuff can sound a little samey, especially with respect to the intensity, especially if you start listening to lots of the live dates as listening. That band can be very almost kind of make you claustrophobic with Tyner's very tight kind of comping and Trane and Jones' torrential action. Definitely not the music for any and every mood, though of course they play some beautiful, more spacious ballads too, like "Spiritual" and "Alabama," but even those have an emotional intensity that's pretty heavy.
     
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  23. Lonson

    Lonson Don't get around much anymore Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chardon, Ohio
    The owner of International Phonograph has been posting on the Organissimo board and noted that he has been frustrated in getting the tapes he wants (master tapes) from the labels holding them and so he had backed off from tackling new projects; he still hopes to eventually put out the Joe Daly Trio at Newport (one of the first projects he wanted to do) material one day, but he is having trouble getting access to the tapes to this one as well.
     
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  24. jkm

    jkm The Medium is the Massage

    Location:
    Vancouver, CANADA
    That explains that. On their next release I'm going to reopen the 2013 thread on this label. I managed to get all their releases but just barely for a couple.
     
  25. alankin1

    alankin1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philly
    Joe Lovano Us Five – Cross Culture (Blue Note Records)
    — Joe Lovano – tenor and G mezzo-soprano saxophone, aulochrome, tárogató, oborom drum, gongs, shakers, puddle drums; James Weidman – piano; Esperanza Spalding – bass or Peter Slavov – bass; Otis Brown III – drums; Francisco Mela – drums, balafon, whistle; plus Lionel Loueke – guitar

    [​IMG]
     
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