Post an obscure cartoon (theatrical or TV)

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by PaulKTF, Mar 21, 2017.

  1. Solitaire1

    Solitaire1 Forum Resident

    Romie-O And Julie-8: Released by Nelvana.

     
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  2. Diablo Griffin

    Diablo Griffin Forum Resident

    There's this anime (which my avatar and signature are from BTW) called Miss Machiko that aired back in 1981 in Japan. It's about a new elementary school teacher who helps out her students with their everyday problems while regularly getting herself into accidental risque situations. What's funny is that while it was made for children, it's filled with upskirt shots, touching, and occasionally, uncensored breasts. How could you get away with something like this in the early 80's when networks were more uptight about taboo content in TV shows?! With that said, I watched a few episodes last year to see just how far it could go for a kid's show, and even though there were quite a few times were I felt uncomfortable watching it, I have to admit that I actually enjoyed it for the most part. :hide::hide::hide::hide::hide: It's pretty cute and fun for what it is, especially during the less fanservicey moments. When the show is "safe" enough, it follows typical kid's cartoon cliches well enough to be entertaining. The music is very abstract , yet catchy. The art style is adorable and the many of the characters are likeable (even if they're not very well written). I realize that it's not the forum's cup of tea, but the show is worth watching for at least 2 or 3 episodes if you're a classic anime fan and don't mind some raunchy moments (again, for a kid's show). There are very few guiltly pleasures that I have since I'm not ashamed to enjoy most of what I like, but with this show, I feel that it qualifies as one. I only get to live once, so I may as well enjoy it, right? Since I can't find a suitable clip to put here, I'm just going to say that the first 45 episodes are on Crunchyroll. It's free (though you need to pay for HD) and official, so don't worry if you think it's illegal.
     
  3. Ginger Ale

    Ginger Ale Well-Known Member

    Location:
    New York
    I have, on a DVD that cost a dollar, a dubbed copy of Panda and The White Serpent, which was said to be Japan's first full-length animated feature. I would love to see it subbed, but I'm not sure I can find any version.
     
  4. PaulKTF

    PaulKTF Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    USA
    Laura The Prairie Girl- A Japanese cartoon based on Little House On The Prairie. I kind of want to see this dubbed into English.

     
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  5. Ginger Ale

    Ginger Ale Well-Known Member

    Location:
    New York
    I'd like to see it dubbed into Japanese! :D

    The style would seem heavily influenced by Miyazaki....if not for the air date of the 1970s! Miyazaki was in turn influenced by The Snow Queen (upthread), with its plucky heroine risking all for a beloved friend.
     
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  6. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    Momotaro's Divine Sea Warriors -- First Anime feature film ever produced, directed by Mitsuyo Seo, who was ordered to make a propaganda film during World War II by the Japanese Naval Ministry.

    In one notable scene our hero interrogates a cringing and cowardly British officer. Supposedly the voice was provided by an actual British POW, who disappeared before war's end and was never located.

    The film's final scene, where the cute little animals practice parachuting onto a giant map of the US, and then stroll joyously into the sunset, is actually kind of a classic.

     
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  7. Ginger Ale

    Ginger Ale Well-Known Member

    Location:
    New York
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  8. Maybe it's because this appeals to the music lover in me, but I had a VHS compilation of vintage animated shorts back in the mid '80s and wore the following part out:

     
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  9. fitzysbuna

    fitzysbuna Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    the mighty heroes ! from the 60's
     
  10. How do you "Favourite" a thread? :agree:

    :-popcorn:



    OK, it's only from 1989 but it was very hard to find a good clean copy until the Australian ABC played it a couple of months ago.
     
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  11. Ginger Ale

    Ginger Ale Well-Known Member

    Location:
    New York
    I don't know how obscure this is, but I always thought it was weird: Colonel Bleep.

     
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  12. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
  13. Solitaire1

    Solitaire1 Forum Resident

    A series I enjoyed as a kid. I liked that they weren't the most competent heroes but they tried their best. BTW, a few years ago there was a comic book of The Mighty Heroes which gave their origin and introduced a new member.
     
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  14. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    Promo film trying to sell "Animascope" (a form of rotoscoping) to the industry (c. 1966):



    Animascope was eventually used in Yellow Submarine and some Bakshi features.
     
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  15. BLUESJAZZMAN

    BLUESJAZZMAN Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex , England.
  16. Oh no! Don't get me started! :evil:

     
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  17. PaulKTF

    PaulKTF Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    USA
    I really need to buy this on DVD and re-watch the series again. I remember really enjoying the animation style and the stories years ago.
     
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  18. Ouch - I just looked for the DVD, @PaulKTF , and they practically don't exist! You'll have to settle for YouTube copies for now, I think.. Jeez! I'm glad we bought our copy when we did!
     
  19. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie


    "Animated Soviet Propaganda S01: American Imperialist

    Shooting Range, 1979, V. Tarasov. Soyuzmultfilm.

    Based on a play by V. Slatkin. An unemployed American gets a job in a shooting gallery as a live target; the greedy capitalist owner charges patrons double for the chance to shoot at a human being. Tarasov, a fan of J.D. Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye,” modeled the film’s hero on Holden Caulfield. An artist as well as an animation director, Tarasov combed through back issues of “America,” a magazine published by the U.S. government during the Cold War, and American comic books, to lovingly create the film’s fabulous New York City back drop. The attention to detail is amazing (and sometimes off base), from the graffiti on the buildings to the brand name on the back of the hero’s tennis shoes."
     
  20. vince

    vince Stan Ricker's son-in-law

    Haven't read all the pages here, but, did anyone yet say "Persepolis"?
     
  21. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    Escuela De Asesinos (Spanish for "School of Murderers") was a Cold War-era (circa 1970) animated film that depicted the tragedy that unfolds when a young Communist revolutionary trained in Cuba returns to his home country in Latin America.​

     
  22. The sound is almost non-existent, so turn your volume up to 11 and you might hear something other than tape hiss!

    I like this song. A lot. :agree:

     
  23. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    The first film adaptation of The Hobbit (1966). It was created only so the producers could retain the rights. Has no respect for the source material and plays fast and loose with the story.​

     
  24. PaulKTF

    PaulKTF Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    USA
    That's still better than most Filmatoin productions. :)
     
  25. Dillydipper

    Dillydipper Sultan Of Snark

    First thing I thought of when I saw this thread today was Richard Condie's "The Big Snit". Lucky I looked, because...I already had! Okay, here's another one you're not likely to see on 1960's afternoon local kids' shows (although a 1999 award-darling):
    Alexander Petrov's treatment of Hemmingway's The Old Man and the Sea, done entirely, painstakingly painted on the back of a glass plane, stop-motion.
     
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