So what do you guys plug your equipment into? Powerstrips?

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by ZappaSG, May 18, 2007.

  1. ZappaSG

    ZappaSG New Member

    Location:
    Philadelphia
    What the safest way to go about protecting LCD tv's, stereos, computers, etc.?

    We have our Mac and our printers/scanners in a really nice Belkin Surge Protector. Our new LCD just goes into a basic power strip, along with our DVD player.

    Does any of this make a difference? There is a lighted switch on the basic power strip and sometimes the light blinks really fast. Is this an indication of something?

    :confused:
     
  2. XMIAudioTech

    XMIAudioTech New Member

    Location:
    Petaluma, CA
    That the neon pilot bulb in the switch is failing, usually. I have seen that happen so many times I can't count.

    I use generic el-cheapo power strips or 'surge protectors' (which usually have just a thermistor to provide the 'protection') for just about all of my gear. Nary a problem.

    -Aaron
     
  3. ex_mixer

    ex_mixer Forum Resident

    Location:
    New Jersey
    My Home Theater setup, 46" LCD, Amp, speakers, dvd player, cable box, gets plugged into this Belkin PF-60:

    http://ecost.com/detail.aspx?edp=2634436

    My 2 channel setup in the attic and about 10K worth of Computer and recording studio gear gets plugged into a 1400 APC Smart UPS. Cost about $1200.00 in 1999. Batteries cost about $150 to replace every four years or so. For me it's all about peace of mind. My AC dims and fluctuates during high summer usage days. Storms have burnt out TV's and other stereo stuff in power strips in the past. I got wise in 1999 and spent some dough to protect all my stuff.
    good luck.
     
  4. TONEPUB

    TONEPUB Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    I refuse to get sucked into another one of these discussions....
     
  5. Glen B

    Glen B New Member

    Location:
    USA
    It is varistors or metal oxide varistors (MOVs) that provides the surge protection not a thermistor. A thermistor is a type of resistor that changes resistance according to temperature -- often used in amplifiers to guard against thermal runaway. :)
     
  6. Glen B

    Glen B New Member

    Location:
    USA
    Two-channel system into DIY balanced power with MOV surge protection, home theater system into a Belkin PF-60, computers and other devices around the house into single-outlet surge protectors from Radio Shack.
     
  7. DrJ

    DrJ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA, USA
    On the suggestion of SH Forum member Metralla (Geoff), I use an inexpensive Wiremold power strip. As Geoff said:

    Works well for me.

    It's probably my imagination or something - NOT naysaying power conditioners, by any means, so please no snipes! - but I've tried power conditioners and regular surge protectors and feel they take a little something off the sound - slight loss of dynamics. Again I fully realize it's probably "psychoacoustics" rather than a real phenomenon, but it bugs me, being a neurotic type, so I just skip them altogether. I live dangerously while listening, hoping there won't be a sudden power surge (so far, so good!), and when done listening, I just unplug the Wiremold from the wall to prevent a catastrophe.
     
  8. ZappaSG

    ZappaSG New Member

    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Thanks guys!

    :righton:
     
  9. bdiament

    bdiament Producer, Engineer, Soundkeeper

    Location:
    New York
    Hi ZappaSG,

    As far as protection goes, a surge protector (at the least) is a good idea.

    In my experience, the one thing to be careful of however, is that some computer surge protectors can actually add noise and make the sound/picture of your playback system worse than plugging directly into the wall.

    Several years ago, I tried a few Monster power conditioners on 30-day trial. It didn't take an A/B to hear and see the difference. I left them in the system and haven't looked back.

    I use one for the main audio system (an HTS-2000), one for the projector (an HTS-400) and carry another one (also HTS-400) on remote recording dates to plug my laptop and mic preamp/A-D converter into.

    Not saying these are the "best", just that they work for me.
    (I'd love to try Nordost's Thor in my system but that will have to wait until I win the lottery. ;-} )

    Best regards,
    Barry
    www.soundkeeperrecordings.com
    www.barrydiamentaudio.com
     
  10. DrJ

    DrJ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA, USA
    Thanks for commenting on the Monster power conditioners, Barry - I didn't try those and must admit, it does make me nervous to not have any protection in my system. I at one point ran a Richard Gray unit that I felt sucked some of the life out of the sound so I sold it. I might have to give the Monster HTS-2000 a whirl, seems like a very reasonable price.
     
  11. tommy-thewho

    tommy-thewho Forum Resident

    Location:
    detroit, mi
    I use Monster Power conditioners... Reasonably priced and seem to work well.
     
  12. LesPaul666

    LesPaul666 Active Member

    Location:
    New Jersey
    Ditto.:agree:
     
  13. XMIAudioTech

    XMIAudioTech New Member

    Location:
    Petaluma, CA
    My bad.

    -Aaron
     
  14. Ski Bum

    Ski Bum Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Another ditto on the Monster power conditioner, though I have not made comparisons with other conditioners.

    I have made the comparison of plugging components such as a preamp into a strip surge protector versus directly into the wall. You should try it -- the strip surge protector clearly detracted from the soundstage and air.
     
  15. JA Fant

    JA Fant New Member

    IMO, give Richard Gray conditioners a try!
     
  16. Kayaker

    Kayaker Well-Known Member

    Location:
    New Joisey Now
    I've got a whole house surge protector that doubles as a circuit breaker in my electrical panel. Got the idea a few years ago here. Had to replace it last year after it took a surge. Protects the whole house well. No more power strips for me.
     
  17. ZappaSG

    ZappaSG New Member

    Location:
    Philadelphia

    Thanks Barry, I appreciate it!

    :righton:
     
  18. bobrex

    bobrex Active Member

    I've use a PS Audio Power Director 3.5. It not only gives me surge protection, but it also isolates outlet banks and I think it's a dessert topping.
    The newest version is supposed to outperform the 3.5 in isolation.

    Kal Rubinson reviewed the 3.5 in Stereophile and found that it was the only unit he tested that improved dynamics.
     
  19. Mike F

    Mike F Active Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I have a "15 Amp, 8 Isolated Receptacle Point of Use Unit for Audio Use" Brickwall ($250). Lots of technical info on site, which is a refreshing change compared to "audiophile" surge protection.
    It's supposed to be lightening proof but haven't had to see if that's true. It's a very solid little bugger. :)
     
  20. motorcitydave

    motorcitydave Enlightened Rogue

    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV, USA
    I plug my equipment right into the wall sockets...I haven't had any trouble.
     
  21. Larry

    Larry Member

    Location:
    Ohio, USVI
    Yet another ditto on Monster power conditioners. I use a HTPS-7000 Pro.
     
  22. Gary Freed

    Gary Freed Well-Known Member

    Some power strips offer a limited warranty against power surge damage up to $1,000.

    In our house we have all kinds of surge protectors starting in the range of a $9 General Electric purchased at the local pharmacy.
     
  23. Grant

    Grant Proud Nerd

    I use both a Monster and a Belkin power strip for the computer and stereo. I plan to get an APC for the PC soon, as I think we're in for a heavy thunderstorm season this summer.
     
  24. thegage

    thegage Well-Known Member

    I use a PS Audio Power Plant Premier, but if I wanted something a little more reasonably priced I'd go with their Quintet. PS Audio has some interesting information on their site with respect to useful surge and spike protection, and how many so-called products don't really protect that well.

    John K.
     

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