Software Burning at 1x, 2x speeds

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Lovealego, Sep 13, 2006.

  1. Lovealego

    Lovealego Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Danville, CA
    I recently purchased an external cd/dvd burner by plextor.
    It came with Nero Express software package.
    The lowest speed you can set is 8x.
    I set it at that, and it still burned higher (12x).
    Still, I would like to burn at 1x or 2x.
    What software package can I get that will allow this?
    Im using it to burn audio cds, and so far the only one I tried skipped awfully in my car on the way to work. It was decent media too.

    My goal is to make an archive of my gold cd collection using the best media, and software package available. I already have the matsui golds, now I need a good software package.

    any suggestions?
  2. Grant

    Grant Proud Nerd

    Most burners today will not burn at 1x or 2x at all. And, even if you could, it's not always the wisest choice, as you get increased errors.

    It's A BAD scene, the burns at 1x sound phenomenal, but they are riddled with errors with most of today's blanks. You may find that you can do excellent burns at 8x, which is the lowest speed my LiteOn will do.
  3. Claude

    Claude Forum Resident

    Location:
    Luxembourg
    The limiting factor is indeed the blanks. They are not suitable for such slow burning speeds.

    The burners read the suitable speeds from the disc and then the software only makes these speeds available. It's not the software programmer that set a certain minimum burning speed.
  4. Grant

    Grant Proud Nerd

    One can try using the music-only blanks. They are made to by written at slower speeds because most consumer standalone burners write at slower speeds.
  5. jkauff

    jkauff Forum Resident

    Location:
    Doylestown, PA USA
    I don't know if it's still true, but the magic speed limit used to be 16x. Different manufacturers employed different writing technologies to break the 16x Constant Linear Velocity (CLV) barrier, and some of the resulting high-speed burned CD-Rs had problems being read by older drives, particularly car CD drives. By setting your burning speed at 16x, the burner supposedly wrote in straight CLV mode, thus eliminating any read problems.

    I don't think any drive made within the past five years would have a problem reading a disc burned at, say, 40x or higher. My car player was made in 2000 and can play these discs just fine. Because I used to trade live audio shows, and didn't know what players my trading partners would be using, I burned all my shows at 16x. I don't trade anymore, so I do my audio burning at the highest speed Nero and my Plextor drive can go.

    One additional consideration: there's been a controversy for years over whether certain high-speed burning strategies create a higher level of jitter than low-speed burning. Jitter results vary so widely depending on the drive mechanics, the blank media dye and quality, and the drive used to test the disc that I think the question will remain open until we move to holographic storage. ;)
  6. Lovealego

    Lovealego Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Danville, CA
    ok, so since i got a bad first test try at 10-12x, i should either set it at 16x, or let it burn in automatic mode?
  7. lukpac

    lukpac Forum Resident

    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Just burn and try. I've never had an issue with my Lite-On at 48x...
  8. Claude

    Claude Forum Resident

    Location:
    Luxembourg
    I burn 52x CD-Rs at 8x, and they sound and play fine on all my CD players.
  9. Curiosity

    Curiosity Portable Audio Fan

    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Agree.

    I use Nero 6 with mine and find that 4 or 8 x times which the lite-on drive will does is very good on the data discs I use (imitation, TDK 800mb or Philips).

    Is there something with the OP's burner when it comes to the minimum speed it will burn at?

    One thing to watch out for is sometimes upon inserting the disc it will go for the maximum speed permitted - remember to drop the speed using the tab to the setting you want.

    Regards,
  10. jkauff

    jkauff Forum Resident

    Location:
    Doylestown, PA USA
    What model Plextor do you have? Some models have a feature called VariRec that is optimized for audio recordings. You lose some space on the disc, because the pits and lands are larger and spaced differently, but you might want to try it for making backups of your gold audio CDs. You can't buy any better blanks than those gold Mitsui ones (I still have some nice gold Kodak blanks that I use for the same purpose), so if your Plextor supports that mode, give it a try at 16x. If Nero Express doesn't do VariRec, you can always download the latest version of Plextor Professional. It's mighty geek-ish, but it works great, supports all the Plextor features, and it's free for Plextor owners.
  11. nmp69

    nmp69 Member

    Location:
    MIAMI, FLORIDA
    Hi Lovealego,

    I use CD-RWIN to do my dubs.
    I am able to record at: 1x,2x,4x,16x using all types of CD-R Media.
    I am currently using Mitsui Silver Blanks.
    I have an LG Brand-CD burner which came with my HP computer.
    Also, a limiting factor regarding speed could be the burner you are using.
    Many of the current burners don't support 1x & 2x.
    Hope this info helps.
  12. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    I just bought a new spindle of CDR-audio made by Fuji Film which can record at 1X to 40X, but I have not tried any yet. My Philips CDR-820, an audio CD recorder, can only record at 1X or 4X. I can record at 4X only if the source is an original. If the source is some copy, it will only record at 1X. I have yet to burn any music CD's on any computers.
  13. GregB

    GregB New Member

    I seem to remember that when stand-alone CD recorders first became available at least one of them did not make perfect bit-for-bit copies. Something was changed, but I can't recall how or why. Maybe DA-AD conversion within the recorder. Don't believe my HK CDR 26 is guilty of that. I've used it to make excellent copies of vinyl and reel-to-reel plus indistinguishable copies of cds. Currently using Fuji All Purpose with no complaints. CD copy record speed is adjustable. I can recommend it without reservation.

    Greg
  14. Grant

    Grant Proud Nerd

    Yes, Philips CD recorders ran everything thtough analog conversions to prevent bit-perfect copies as a cocession to the record companies.
  15. Claude

    Claude Forum Resident

    Location:
    Luxembourg
    If it works with all types of blanks, it means that CDRWIN ignores the speed recommendations of the CD-R manufacturer and will burn the blanks outside of their specifications. The data error rate will probably be higher than when the CD-R is burned at the higher, recommended speed.
  16. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    I have used my Philips CDR-820 to record close to 50 audio CDR's and they all sound bit-accurate to me, as claimed by Philips in the owners manual.
  17. analog4011

    analog4011 Member

    Location:
    Chicago, Ill. USA
    1X recording on cdr is best. I don't buy that BS for a second that anything higher in recording speed is NOT as musical. The original post was written because of skipping. I am talking sound...not skipping. I only use gold Taiyo Yuden 74 cdrs rated at 48x. Real time speed ONLY! I can hear a loss of dynamic range otherwise. As for PC software....I have the SCSI Plextor 40/12/40S cdr recorder and it will record at 1X. The option is always there. I however cannot get my CD-ROM to read any less then 4X. There is a read option for 1X but will not do it. Alcohol 120% is a good cd/cdr/dvd program. :)
  18. lukpac

    lukpac Forum Resident

    Location:
    Madison, WI
    There really isn't such a thing as "real time" extraction, since DAE doesn't work the same way as playback in a CD player.

    And if faster burn speeds are causing you a lack of dynamic range, there's something seriously wrong with your system.
  19. analog4011

    analog4011 Member

    Location:
    Chicago, Ill. USA
    Your right on the first paragraph. My duplicator will extract very close to 1X. The PC will not. A firmware issue I guess. I have four different duplicating systems. Highly unlikely that all four are "seriously wrong". Lucpac...I am talking a subtle difference hear. But a difference nonetheless. I know exactly what speed difference will do to a cd burn. :)
  20. OldCoder

    OldCoder Well-Known Member

    Location:
    St. Paul, MN, USA
    Go to the Plextor website and check if the PlexTools Professional that came with your drive is current. If not, download the newer. Install the latest version.

    Now run it and *STUDY* what your burner is capable of. Make a chart of the different burn speeds, select a tune you know well, and TRY EACH ONE,
    noting the difference in sound. You'll find the best *your* drive can do....
  21. analog4011

    analog4011 Member

    Location:
    Chicago, Ill. USA

    Are you saying each speed will result in different musical characteristics? :righton:
  22. Grant

    Grant Proud Nerd

    Well, were here at the point where it is apparent there are two camps: one believes that the faster burning speeds negatively affects the sound on the CD-R, and the other which does not believe that faster burn speeds affect the sound. I am of the former group.
  23. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    I also do not believe faster burning speeds do not negatively impact the quality of music recorded on the CDR.
  24. OldCoder

    OldCoder Well-Known Member

    Location:
    St. Paul, MN, USA
    Are you saying each speed will result in different musical characteristics?

    No, I am saying that he needs to learn what *HIS* device does. He may find with his ears there is a difference - or not. I have found big differences with some burners (I got rid of them) and almost none at different speeds with good ones (I really like Plextor...and use them exclusively).

    Another variable in this for him is a USB connection.... So, gather some empirical data....
  25. ChrisG

    ChrisG New Member

    Location:
    New York City
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    I've always heard this as well. Mostly from IT guys at the office. Not for audio, but data, at one company I use to work at not long ago it was the official company policy that CDRs must be burned at 16x because the IT help-desk was sick of getting so many calls about CD burning problems.

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