Why the 80s Hate? (Production & Sounds)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Runicen, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. sleeptowin

    sleeptowin Forum Resident

    Location:
    Birmingham
    i was born in 77. i lived through all of the 80s and even as a child thought the music was terrible. while there is some good stuff in the 80s, i dislike the production on a lot of 80s music. just personal preference, but by the time i was 12 i was looking for other music as 80s music wasn't speaking to me. i still tend to ignore 80s music a lot, every time i check out recommendations i just cant get in to it
     
    Dude111 likes this.
  2. LeBon Bush

    LeBon Bush Hound of Love

    Location:
    Austria
    One thing to add:

    [​IMG]

    Love the film (please spare the sarcasm, I won't listen to it anyway ;) ), love the soundtrack!
     
    canonlon and Runicen like this.
  3. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
    Also, you can actually like those stereotypical DX7 sounds. :wave: :shtiphat:
     
  4. strummer101

    strummer101 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lakewood OH
    When the 80s arrived, I became immediately bored with most of the 70s.
    But I was listening to college radio, not the hits.
     
    pig bodine, mooseman and Phasecorrect like this.
  5. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    You were too young my little grasshopper. The 80s had it all: hardcore punk, college/indie, synth pop, power pop, new wave, metal, house, hip hop.
     
  6. Classicrock

    Classicrock Forum Resident

    Location:
    South West, UK.
    A record I can still like. There are degrees of bad production in the 80's and sometimes the music wins through and sort of fits the sound. BC and Heart albums from the mid 80s I can tolerate. Something progressive sounding like So or Hounds of Love can still sound great. The way some albums were originally mastered and cut contributes to the overall sound. The reissues of So (Classic Records) and Hounds Of Love (AF) on vinyl show the recordings to be much better. The synth pop stuff I could never get apart from the likes of Talk Talk, Propaganda and Thomas Dolby. Most 70's big name artists just sound wrong in the 80's and this coincided with a slump in their musical quality.
     
  7. Vinyl Socks

    Vinyl Socks Forum Resident

    Location:
    Niles, Ohio
    "Sunset Grill".
    'Nuff said.
     
  8. mooseman

    mooseman Forum Resident

    Lots of great bands in the 80s, I loved all the new wave stuff and Alternative music. What I disliked were the big hair and spandex bands, you can keep Rat, Cinderella, Poison, Accept, Guns & Posers..:evil:
     
    Diablo Griffin likes this.
  9. Dude111

    Dude111 An Awesome Dude

    Location:
    USA
    I love this thread...... IT SPEAKS L0UDLY!!
     
  10. Svetonio

    Svetonio Forum Resident

    Location:
    Serbia
    People have the most complains about that "robotic" sound of synthesizers in the 80s. However, there are many examples where the synths in the 80s were used in "human" way, as for example Bruce Springsteen's 80s stuff.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  11. Dude111

    Dude111 An Awesome Dude

    Location:
    USA
    Well my main complaint is how they started ruining good analogue sound more and more in the late 70s+ by digitally mixing the stuff SO EVEN THE RECORD SOUNDS LIKE A STERILE CD!!!

    Thats my main complaint!!


    Its sad there wasnt more ppl to defend analog and say "WE ARENT GONNA DO THIS... ANALOG SOUNDS BETTER AND WE ARE STICKING WITH IT!"
     
  12. pig bodine

    pig bodine God’s Consolation Prize

    Location:
    Syracuse, NY USA
    If all you cared about was top 40, MTV’s minuscule playlist or aging 60’s and 70’s artists trying to be “down with the kids,” of course it was a terrible decade. I was 16 when the decade started and 26 when it ended, and I’ll take the Wipers, Minutemen, Husker Du, Celibate Rifles, Spacemen 3, Dream Syndicate, Flipper, Replacements, Died Pretty, Feelies, Loop, Sonic Youth, Big Black, Talk Talk, That Petrol Emotion, Black Flag, Minor Threat, the Chills, the Clean, The Verlaines, Chris Knox and the Tall Dwarfs, The Go Betweens, The Church, The Butthole Surfers, XTC, Naked Raygun, The Effigies and many more over Abbey Road, Dark Side Of the Moon, Who’s Next or anything on Classic Rock radio any day of the week.
     
  13. strummer101

    strummer101 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lakewood OH
    Preach!
    :edthumbs:
     
  14. Lownote30

    Lownote30 Bass Clef Addict

    Location:
    Nashville, TN, USA
    I grew up in the 80's and lived through that decade once already. I keep waiting for the day the nostalgia for it ends. The production was flat sounding to me, and too processed. Looking back on it now, though, I don't hate the music. With each passing year, I appreciate it more because current pop music isn't nearly as melodic, or inventive. It's funny, because I used to think that it couldn't get worse than 80's music. I was really wrong about that. This is all just my opinion of course.
     
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  15. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    The 80s were an exciting time primarily for the above genre mentioned: college radio. For many of us who grew up in the decade , it was the first time we ventured outside of our parents lp collection, which was classic rock. It was a small, amateurish niche market that nobody took
    serious until REM came along. The few that were able to crossover into the mainstream from this genre later in the decade became superstars: U2, the Cure, and again REM. However , if you were not on a college campus, you were largely unaware this market existed, which is why many slag off the decade. They were exposed to mainly top 40 hits. That being said, the 80s include some of the best selling , and imho, strongest mainstream lps of all time: Back in black, Joshua Tree , Thriller, Appetite, Moving Pictures, VH 1984, to name only a few. Unfortunately, the 90s killed regional and college radio, as well as vinyl, which has made a nice resurgence
     
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  16. strummer101

    strummer101 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lakewood OH
    The college radio in Northeast Ohio was broadcast. I could dial 5 or 6 different stations on my car FM stereo pretty much anywhere in the Cleveland/Akron area. You didn't necessarily have to be on a campus, and that still holds true today.
     
  17. vinyl diehard

    vinyl diehard Two-Channel Forever

    80's sucked. Mostly. Music took a dump.
     
    Dude111 likes this.
  18. strummer101

    strummer101 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lakewood OH
    Insightful.:rolleyes:
     
    JulesRules likes this.
  19. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    NO hate from me...I love the 80's it was a poor man's 60's...lots of melodic songs...
     
  20. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    it's all according to what you were listening to...I see more positive than negative.
     
  21. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    those damn DRUMS!!! LOL.
     
    mikaal and EdogawaRampo like this.
  22. Steve G

    Steve G Forum Resident

    Location:
    los angeles
    The Yamaha dx7 sounds is kind of gross but there's lots of great sounding music
     
  23. Flippikat

    Flippikat Forum Resident

    Well put. As many have said before, the eventual success of REM, then Nirvana & grunge (and all that came with it) was a dam bursting - one that had built up over a decade since new wave fizzled out.
     
  24. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    As one that worked at a state college radio station, most people would be astonished at how low tech , in todays terms, things operated. But that was an integral part of its charm: it had no agenda. Unlike commercial radio, there was no advertising or marketing pressure. It was really no different than spinning records for your friends. Since the transmitter rarely could be received off campus, like in larger schools, it really was a vehicle for me to get access to many lps (imports) I couldnt afford. Thank god for promo copies and cassette taping!

    Although many claimed the 90s breakthrough of Nirvana was a gamechanger, it really, in the long run, had very little staying power. Todays contemporary climate is probably at its lowest denominator, with boy bands and Xfactor/the Voice , etc. But pop music is youth driven, which is a fickle market.
     
    JulesRules likes this.
  25. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    U2, Prince, Guns n Roses, REM, Metallica, Micheal Jackson....it was an era of megastars ...dont be ridiculous
     

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