X-files reboot?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Mirrorblade.1, Jan 18, 2015.

  1. I also loved the cast in the final seasons. Feel they get an undeserved bad rap.
     
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  2. But there was overlap. I loved it still.
     
  3. Bryan

    Bryan Starman Jr.

    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
    I can't remember, but was there ever much overlap with Mulder and the new characters? I just remember Scully sharing the screen with the T-1000 guy for a bit, but that's all. It's been years though, so I could very well be wrong.
     
  4. Mulder was back a couple of times. Scully longer
     
  5. greelywinger

    greelywinger That T-Rex Guy

    Location:
    Dayton, Ohio USA
    I remember watching the first 5 seasons.
    I think I may have seen random episodes after that.
    After Season 5 I lost my dad & in the middle of Season 6 I started dating my future wife.
    Didn't see too much TV then, but I did keep up with Star Trek.

    Darryl
     
  6. Moonbeam Skies

    Moonbeam Skies Forum Resident

    Location:
    Phoenix, Arizona
    I liked the mythology episodes in the 1st season, but after Deep Throat died I thought it got confusing.
    The best way to enjoy the X-Files, imo, is to clear your mind of most of what happened in previous episodes. Assume that Scully has good reason to be skeptical of aliens and the supernatural, and then let the fun begin.
     
  7. Squealy

    Squealy Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Vancouver
    What happened was:

    At the end of season 7 Mulder was abducted by the aliens. Scully spent season 8 working with Robert Patrick, though eventually Mulder reappeared for part of the season. Halfway through that season they introduced Annabeth Gish's character.

    Then in season 9, Gish and Patrick were the principal X-Files investigators, but Scully was still involved most of the time while Mulder was not seen until the series finale.
     
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  8. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    The problem was that they should have made it clear to the viewer that Scully was (obviously) right about being skeptical about these nonsense things and that Mulder was a fool for believing any of it. Instead it sometimes seemed that the shows writers/creators were trying to imply the opposite, which is a big turn off for me.
     
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  9. wayne66

    wayne66 Forum Resident

    I had always assumed that Mulder was done after season 7 and only came back for the finale. I just finished watching the series for the first time and I was so pleased to watch Season 8 and find Mulder came back full time for the final 5 or 6 episodes. Even before that Mulder would be seen briefly in a non speaking role. So I was very pleased by that. I thought the Robert Patrick and Annabeth Gish were fine and should have done a spin off of the X Files after the original show ended.
     
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  10. Any talk of a Lone Gunman reboot.
    :tiphat:
     
  11. Squealy

    Squealy Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Vancouver
    But Scully was usually *wrong* to be skeptical-- almost every weird thing they heard about turned out to be real. It got ridiculous that she would never believe anything after all the crazy **** they saw...

    Or am I misunderstanding what you mean?
     
  12. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    yes, you are misunderstanding.....i didn't like that the writers made out the weird stuff to be true, since things like that can't actually happen. I would have preferred that the skeptic was proved right in every episode, since that is how the world actually is. There are too many people in the world that actually believe this nonsense stuff, and having shows about it on TV where it somehow is "true" just makes things worse.
     
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  13. Squealy

    Squealy Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Vancouver
    Well... There wouldn't have been much of a show if none of it was real, would there? It's science fiction.

    But I'm not crazy about fantastical shows using their fantasy to send the message "you should believe things blindly" either. Lost seemed to be pushing this idea more seriously than the X-Files sometimes.
     
  14. Encuentro

    Encuentro Forum Resident

    I get your point, but it's just a TV show. It's complete fiction, for entertainment purposes. There's no agenda to prove the "impossible." I don't believe in the force or jedi knights, but I like Star Wars. I don't believe in dragons, but I like Game of Thrones.
     
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  15. Wright

    Wright Forum Resident

    Well, the show never made any claims for realism... It clearly was in the realm of the fantastic.
     
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  16. Encuentro

    Encuentro Forum Resident

    Sorry, but I don't buy into any of this. It's fiction, entertainment, nothing more. Either you're entertained or you're not. The shows' writers aren't pushing any ideas or agendas.
     
  17. Encuentro

    Encuentro Forum Resident

    I thought that Robert Patrick and David Duchovny worked well together in the few episodes they were both in. There was some tension between the characters which added an interesting dimension to the show.
     
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  18. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    The problem is that X-Files is set in the 'real' world. Those other shows are set in a fictionalized universe.
     
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  19. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    Yes, i understand. I think it's the point about them putting a skeptic in the show as a foil is the irritating part for me. I guess that's why most of my TV watching is of documentaries. I love shows where they show that psychics are charlatans, etc.
     
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  20. Squealy

    Squealy Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Vancouver
    But both shows regularly had philosophical "faith vs science" type arguments between the characters (where the skeptical character was always wrong) that seemed intended to resonate outside the shows' fantastical universes. The characters and the storytelling were founded on that dichotomy -- Mulder vs Scully, Locke vs Jack.
     
  21. Encuentro

    Encuentro Forum Resident

    Sure. The settings closer are to home, but the shows creators/writers weren't pushing any illusions of realism onto the public. I was an X-Files fan for many years and was friends with a number of people who were fans of the show. I never once had a conversation with anybody regarding the realism of the show. It was understood by everyone that I knew that it was a work of fiction, and that is how we discussed it. Maybe there have been others who have had different discussions about the show, but this thread is the first time I've heard anybody complain about the possibility of anybody misunderstanding the show as anything other than entertainment.
     
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  22. davidshirt

    davidshirt =^,,^=

    Location:
    Grand Terrace, CA
    I liked the earlier seasons but kind of tuned out after a while. For some reason I thought the series ended in 1998 so I'm oddly surprised it actually ended in 2002.
     
  23. Squealy

    Squealy Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Vancouver
    1998 was probably the peak of its popularity -- that's when the movie came out.
     
  24. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    I don't think it matters whether the writers were pushing realism or not, it's the end product itself which rubs some people the wrong way. It's the same type of 'woo' that occurs way too frequently in mainstream shows, such as the paranormal, psychics, fortune tellers, astrology, faith healing, cryptozoology, supernatural phenomena, etc. All pseudoscience masquerading as an actual thing.
     
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  25. Wright

    Wright Forum Resident

    Uhm... Lost is also set in the "real" world. So is Omen, Polstergeist, The Exorcist, and a number of other works of fantastic fiction. That's why they are scary and appealing: because they are set in the real world but go against its rules/logic.

    This is like fantasy/horror 101, going back all the way to Frankenstein and Dracula, which are both set in the real world as well and, unlike The X-Files, actually make a fictional claim for authenticity as part of its horror.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2015
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