Album titles with Grammatical errors

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Aar Gal, Mar 25, 2020 at 9:14 AM.

  1. mr.datsun

    mr.datsun Incompletist

    Location:
    London
    Good points. In British English (and I do not know whether American English is different in this case) it depends on whether you consider the group 'family' to be an impersonal unit or a collection of individuals.

    Consider: 'My family, who have lived on this island all their lives, are determined to remain here.' This sounds correct to my (British) ears.

    I think the car example is misleading because a family can not all drive the same car at the same time. :)

    Question. In American English, if members of the Sinatra family have all expressed the same sentiment, but have all done so at different times, would you then use the plural verb?
     
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  2. mr.datsun

    mr.datsun Incompletist

    Location:
    London
    It's quite common in Britain to come across place names that do not, or perhaps no longer use, possessive apostrophes.

    Potters Bar
    St. Johns Wood
    Parsons Lane

    So it becomes a norm - for example when giving something a title.
     
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  3. Al Gator

    Al Gator You can call me Al

    We have Pikes Peak where I live.
     
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  4. sekaer

    sekaer Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    Can we do SHF thread titles with grammatical errors next?
     
  5. Aftermath

    Aftermath Senior Member

    That would be one of the longest threads in forum history.
     
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  6. Cachiva

    Cachiva Forum Resident

    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    I've read every post so far.

    It's not.
     
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  7. czeskleba

    czeskleba Senior Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    My understanding is that (in US usage) you only use a plural verb when you are indicating differing actions by members of the collective. If they are all doing the same action at the same time (regardless of whether they are speaking as "one voice") it takes a singular verb.

    The dependent clause which ends in the plural "lives" kind of throws off one's ear, but if we remove it then the statement 'My family is determined to remain here.' sounds correct to my (US) ears, and 'My family are determined to remain here' sounds incorrect.

    Ha. We could rewrite the sentence then to state "the family rides to work together in the same car every morning."

    Perhaps. What would be an example of a sentence that would clearly indicate well-wishing done at different times?

    In the case of this album they all appear together expressing their wishes at the same time, so there doesn't seem to be any way to conclude they were suggesting well-wishing at differing times.
     
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  8. Stuggy

    Stuggy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ireland
    & famously quoted from Newton being rude about a competitor natural philosopher who was also a dwarf. Or certainly very short.
     
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  9. richarm

    richarm Forum Resident

    Location:
    UK
    Or even the other guy called Sinatra
     
  10. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
    It's not that cut and dried, though, because "the same action," where we're talking about something numerically distinct (as is the case with different people performing the "same" action) is actually just an abstraction, and as such, whether two actions count as the "same" action is a matter of how one thinks about it (that is, how a particular individual formulates the relevant abstraction). See "nominalism" and the concept of "the non-identity of discernibles" for further info.
     
  11. DTK

    DTK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Europe
    I bet not one single Oasis fan noticed ;).
     
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  12. DTK

    DTK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Europe
    Intentional though.
     
  13. DTK

    DTK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Europe
    Again, intentional. In commercial ventures and branding it's quite common to leave out apostrophes.
     
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  14. Deek57

    Deek57 Forum Resident

    Bitches, as in more than one Bitch, Plural no need for an apostrophe.
     
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  15. Deek57

    Deek57 Forum Resident

    Every thread that is a mixture of British and American English is full of grammatical errors, depending on which side of the pond one lives on.
     
    Jarleboy likes this.
  16. onionmaster

    onionmaster Tropical new waver from the future

    On this note, the German LP of Missing Persons' "Color In Your Life" has "Colour In Your Life" written on the spine. This is obviously correct in British English, but doesn't match the title given on the front (they were an American band).

    There's an old calypso musician Lord Melody whose 1952 78 "MacDonald Almanac" has a variant pressing titling it "McDonald Almanac". The labels were typed by hand by multiple people and it would appear one person got the spelling right and the other didn't. The MacDonald Almanac is a farmer's publication that is still around.
     
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  17. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
    Again, re Bitches Brew, the idea is that it's akin to saying "Musicians Cook"--"cooking" being another slang for gelling together. It's not talking about a brew that belongs to bitches. It's using "brew" as a verb. Obviously it's a pun on "Witch's brew" (or "Witches' brew"), but the idea stemmed from "brewing" as a slang for gelling.

    Think of it as a way of telling you what you're going to hear, what's going on with respect to the album.
     
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  18. mr.datsun

    mr.datsun Incompletist

    Location:
    London
    Plurals should have the apostrophe after the final 's'.

    I think the Bitches Brew example is about titling.
     
  19. DTK

    DTK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Europe
    Yes. It's a reference to Miles' female friends at the time - wife Betty, Colette Mimran, Stella Douglas (wife of Al) and Devon Wilson. Colette and Stella had a clothes boutique and all of them were responsible for turning Miles on to current fashions in clothes and music. All of them were friends of Hendrix.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020 at 9:53 AM
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  20. Deek57

    Deek57 Forum Resident

    You mean things' like dogs', cats' shoes', clothes' penguins' chips' etc. Don't think so.
     
  21. Maltman

    Maltman Somewhat grumpy, but harmless old man.

    Location:
    Vancouver Canada
    Yes, but the apostrophe should go before the 90, as in ‘90s, to denote the missing 19.
     
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  22. Maltman

    Maltman Somewhat grumpy, but harmless old man.

    Location:
    Vancouver Canada
    Metamorpheus?
     
  23. nosliw

    nosliw Azunyan! にゃーーー!

    Location:
    Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Sepultura's "The Past Reborns The Storm" on Schizophrenia but was renamed in North America to "From The Past Comes the Storms".

    But then again, the band mainly used a Portuguese to English to make up their song titles and lyrics. You get weird titles like, "Septic Schizo", "Sarcastic Existence", and "Show Me The Wrath". o_O
     
  24. Maltman

    Maltman Somewhat grumpy, but harmless old man.

    Location:
    Vancouver Canada
    Only if they denote the possessive. It’s commonly used when someone’s name ends in s. For example: I borrowed Mr. Simmonds’ car. It’s also sometimes written: Mr. Simmonds’s car, which is usually the way it is spoken.
     
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  25. jmadad

    jmadad Well-Known Member

    Location:
    NJ

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