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All The World's A Stage - the Shakespeare thread

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by JozefK, Apr 23, 2016.

  1. Scope J

    Scope J Senior Member

    Location:
    Michigan
  2. danasgoodstuff

    danasgoodstuff Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Home (Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan (River)) In normal years, I try to see at least one play here per year. And have also seen many other productions on both sides of the 49th.
     
    NickySee likes this.
  3. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    Clear to them. Nonsense in reality. And irrevelant, in any case. What we do with the plays that were left to us is what's important.
     
    Steve Minkin and danasgoodstuff like this.
  4. Steve Minkin

    Steve Minkin Senior Member

    Location:
    Healdsburg CA
    Two years now without a Shakespeare reading at our house, after 25 years of at least four a year. We'll see if we're ready to go maskless early next year. And after four Zoom readings (Measure For Measure, Sonnets, selected passages, and Comedy of Errors), I'm Zoomed out. It's been such a huge part of my life it feels like I've lost a limb. Fortunately my gigs have begun to rebound, so I don't have lots of time to brood about it. We had to cancel our live Midsummer Night's Dream because of the Delta surge. I'm thinking Pericles for our next one back -- we were all enthused about two late collaborations that were new to almost all of us, Pericles and Two Noble Kinsmen, so it seems like a good reentry. I also want to get to The Merchant of Venice soon -- the biblical reference Shylock makes in I, iii has always baffled me, so I've done some research on both the bible story and its application to Elizabethan views on usury, and have a handle now on why it's there, although why Shylock goes out of his way to tell this to the despised Merchant (one of Shakespeare's more clearly gay characters) is beyond me.


    The argument from snobbery that Shakespeare isn't Shakespeare has always been weak, and would require a massive conspiracy of writers, printers, relatives and theatrical professionals to bring off.

    Duke Ellington -- Star Crossed Lovers


     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2021
    Dignan2000 and Mr&MrsPotts like this.
  5. Scope J

    Scope J Senior Member

    Location:
    Michigan

    How is it "nonsense"?

    Everything in de Vere's
    life lines up with the works,
    have you watched the
    documentary?
     
  6. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    YES. Because the film makes no attempt to chronicle what the day to day working life of a theater collaborator/writer like Shakespeare would have been like - and, more imporatantly, give evidence of De Vere's direct involvement with the Globe's business. We have proof of Shakespeare's involvement. Nothing of De Vere's. It's right up there (or down there) with Anonymous (2011) in terms of credibility. Great free version here.

    "This whole business is trying to find out the man, the person, the living breathing, writing person behind the name. And the journey is fraught and long." - Sir Derek Jacobi

    I'd add, futile. The business of a playwright is not to reveal who he or she is, personally, but who we all are as human beings. Most of the people arguing for someone other than Shakespeare as the "true" author of the plays almost always have some personal/class/societal axe to grind. It's a central point in their arguments and it takes us away from the actual point of the plays, which are to show a glass to ourselves, not provide code for a private coterie of snobs.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2021
    Steve Minkin likes this.
  7. Steve Minkin

    Steve Minkin Senior Member

    Location:
    Healdsburg CA
    [​IMG]


    West Side Story (2021) -- MAGNIFICENT! Better singers than the original film, great dancing, tighter script. Two slight moves toward Romeo and Juliet references -- an indirect reference to Juliet's "You kiss by the book" in the balcony/ fire-escape scene and an ending somewhat more aligned with the play.
     
    mike s in nyc likes this.
  8. Mr&MrsPotts

    Mr&MrsPotts Forum Resident

    Location:
    Co Down
    Been working through this (Arden) collection of the sonnets, pacing myself as I go.

    [​IMG]
     
    Steve Minkin likes this.
  9. Steve Minkin

    Steve Minkin Senior Member

    Location:
    Healdsburg CA
    SHAKESPEARE UNCOVERED: Just discovered this fabulous series. I'm getting it on Amazon Prime, third season free, second season $3 a pop, first season not available but I'm searching for other ways in. Each episode focuses on a single play, uses several staged versions for reference, interviews with scholars, actors, directors, etc. Very well done!

    Shakespeare Uncovered

    [​IMG]

     
    Dignan2000 likes this.
  10. Steve Minkin

    Steve Minkin Senior Member

    Location:
    Healdsburg CA
    Saw and loved The Tragedy of Macbeth tonight -- Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand as the doomed couple, directed by Joel Coen. Dark, claustrophobic, excellent -- I'll post a review in the next couple of days.

    This version has, arguably, the greatest opening sequence of any film or stage version I've ever seen, entirely due to the magnificent grotesque contortions of Kathryn Hunter as a witch. She blew my mind as Puck in the Julie Taymor version of The Dream, and she creates an image for the ages in her portrayal of all three weird sisters in this film. Must be seen! I can't find any film of her in this role, but here's a taste of her work in The Dream.

     
    wolfram likes this.
  11. Steve Minkin

    Steve Minkin Senior Member

    Location:
    Healdsburg CA
    [​IMG]

    The Tragedy of Macbeth --
    the new Joel Coen film starring Denzel Washington and Francis McDormand. The couple is much older than most Macbeths and are played somewhat cooler if no less intense. The film is in black and white with odd, depersonalized sets, long featureless corridors, unadorned angular rooms, stark corners of fortresses, all of which generate feelings of isolation, disorientation, and claustrophobia. The film's opening is absolutely sensational, featuring the marvelous Kathryn Hunter (Puck in Julie Taymor's Dream) contorting herself into startlingly grotesque postures and movements, she commands the screen whenever she's on. Stephen Root as the Porter provides another small but delicious performance. The play as a whole is cut even more than usual, but the Macbeths' key speeches are all intact and powerfully delivered. Overall -- quirky, limited, but most definitely worth seeing for its memorable high points.
     
    wolfram likes this.
  12. Steve Minkin

    Steve Minkin Senior Member

    Location:
    Healdsburg CA

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