Are Gas Dusters Safe For Removing Loose Dirts On Vinyl Records?

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by AudiophilePhil, Apr 7, 2009.

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  1. AudiophilePhil

    AudiophilePhil Senior Member Thread Starter

    Most of these so-called gas dusters (aka canned air or compressed air) actually contains inert gases such as difluoroethane, trifluoroethane or tetrafluoroethane.
    Are these chemical compounds safe or harmful to vinyl records?
    I am asking because I am planning to use them as a pre-cleaning agent before applying record-cleaning fluids (e.g., Audio Intelligent Vinyl Solutions, Disc Doctor, etc.) on vinyl surface with the use of a record brush or pad.

    Is it safer to use these gas dusters as pre-cleaning agent than using a soft brush (e.g. paint brush)?

    Thanks Hoffmanites!!
     
  2. AudiophilePhil

    AudiophilePhil Senior Member Thread Starter

    I am actually planning to use one of these gas dusters as a pre-cleaning agent (dry surface cleaning to remove loose dirts) prior to wetting the record surface with record-cleaning fluids (e.g., Audio Intelligent Vinyl Solutions, Disc Doctor, etc.).

    Thanks again!!
     
  3. roboss38

    roboss38 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Clovis, CA U.S.A.
    I use them to blow junk off my vinyl before I give the records the Disc Doctor treatment. I haven't noticed any ill effects from using compressed air.
     
  4. Koptapad

    Koptapad Forum Resident

    I can't imagine a quick blast of that gas will affect vinyl. Need to be a little careful with a new can, or inverting an used can, since it can come out as a liquid, especially the tetrafluoroethane. Times when it came out a liquid, it stained the vinyl for a minute then the stain dissipated. I would avoid this just out of common sense. The trick is to always keep the can level.

    Canned gas dusters for electronics are great when used with a carbon fiber brush. I brush the dust into a line and blast the line with the can. I use it on the TT and stylus too when I'm too lazy for the Magic Eraser.
     
  5. onebit

    onebit Forum Resident

    I use one to blow off the inevitable cat hair and pieces of dust before playing a side - better than contaminating the vinyl with my (probably much dirtier) record brush.
     
  6. Mike from NYC

    Mike from NYC Forum Resident

    Location:
    Surprise, AZ
    They are compressed air that has been 'dehumidified and filtered. What's the problem?

    I've used them in photography for more than 40 years and never had a problem.

    The only caveat is to make sure you keep the can upright when spraying.
     
  7. Jvalvano

    Jvalvano Forum Resident

    Location:
    NH
    I use one to blow the occasional hair or dust off an LP. But I am not a chemical engineer nor do I profess to have a working knowledge of the periodic table. :)
     
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