Bee Gees single by single thread

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by cut to the chase, Jul 15, 2018.

  1. Grant

    Grant C'mon let me show you where it's at!

    Location:
    United States
    "Hold On To My Love" - Jimmy Ruffin

    As I said before, I don't know what people hear in this song. I don't much care for it. I never ever heard of it until a couple of years ago. I never heard it being played on the radio out here (even though I admit that I stopped listening to pop radio in late 1980 and 1091).
     
  2. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    Sidebar 16: More Ruffin it

    After "Hold On to My Love" became Jimmy Ruffin's biggest hit in 14 years, RSO released a second single from the Ruffin album Sunrise -- "Night of Love" backed with "Searchin'," both also produced and written by Robin Gibb and Blue Weaver.



    The two sides appear to have been serviced separately to radio: In its Recommended pop singles in the July 5, 1980 issue, Billboard listed both sides. Cash Box reviewed only "Night of Love," burying it deep in its Singles to Watch in the July 5 edition: "A well-orchestrated symphony of electronics, plus a muscular dance beat and a lush chorus of high female backup vocals, take Ruffin's lead vocal to new heights on the follow-up to his Top 15 'Hold On To My Love.'" Record World thought highly enough of the song to put it on Page 1 on July 5: "Ruffin went top 15 with his 'Hold On To My Love.' This successor spotlights more of his rangy, affecting vocal on an upbeat theme & rhythm."

    Neither side made any chart in the trade magazines, not even the extended 101-150 single chart in Record World.

    The 45, released in June 1980 on RSO RS 1042, is fairly rare. The time on "Night of Love" is listed as 3:50, the same as the LP version, and "Searchin'" is listed as 2:53. I've only seen stock copies on Bestway (19), PRC Compton (26), and PRC Richmond (73). Promo copies with an edited version (listed time of 2:53 with an :09 intro for a total of 3:02) of "Night of Love" on them have the number RS 1042A and were pressed by CBS Terre Haute (72). Possibly, a promo of "Searchin'," mono/stereo, may exist with the number RS 1042B from CBS Terre Haute, but although it is listed on Discogs, no image has appeared.

    From the "Here's another clue for you all" department: I mentioned earlier how difficult it is to license "Hold On to My Love." On this 45, the track is listed as "℗ 1980 YAM INC." It appears as if this company was set up by Robin Gibb in 1977 and dissolved in 1986. Thus it's possible that the rights to Jimmy Ruffin's RSO album are now owned by Robin Gibb's estate.
     
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  3. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Another mighty fine example...totally agree.
     
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  4. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    "Woman in Love," part 1:

    Until the late 1970s, I found Barbra Streisand's music to be somewhere between treacly and boring. The main exception was "Stoney End," the Top 10 hit she had in early 1971, which showed that, if she wanted to, Streisand could sound hip and contemporary. Then, when she started having more hit singles in 1974, I found most of the songs to be, shall we say, not my cup of tea.

    The next one to grab my attention was 1978's "Love Theme from 'Eyes of Laura Mars' (Prisoner)," one of her most underrated singles; it is largely forgotten today. And then Streisand went disco -- and it was perfect! I loved "The Main Event/Fight," and I eventually warmed to her powerhouse duet with Donna Summer, "No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)," even if the number of times they repeated the word "enough" made me want to scream "Enough!"

    But none of that prepared me for "Woman in Love."

    I am sure I heard it before it made American Top 40. At this late date, I can't remember the circumstances; I was probably in my dorm room, very early in the fall semester, with the radio on. I don't even know if I knew what was coming. But I loved it. I got goosebumps when I first heard it. That chorus! "It's a riiiiight I defennnnd..." And then the second verse and the way she held "alllllllllllll..." for what felt like days. (I started using that word to test my own breath control. There were several big hits in this period with unusually long held notes, from "Dim All the Lights" by Donna Summer in late 1979 to "All Out of Love" by Air Supply in the summer of 1980.) And then the modulation; Barry Manilow, eat your heart out! As the song ended, I was transfixed. The best word to describe the song was epic. This instantly became my favorite Barbra Streisand record of all time -- and almost 40 years later, it still is. Because it's obviously sung from a woman's point of view, I admit to feeling self-conscious when singing along, but I love singing along anyway.

    On my next trip off campus to go shopping for 45s, "Woman in Love" was one I bought. As an aside, I think on that same trip, I went into the Montgomery Ward store in the Scottsdale Mall in South Bend and found the picture sleeve for "Waterfalls" by Paul McCartney, which I had never seen before (and I learned later was quite rare). "Woman in Love" got a lot of spins on my turntable, and I am certain it hit #1 on my own personal Top 20.

    After Streisand's forays into current sounds, she eventually migrated back to show tunes and wannabe show tunes, where she first made her name on all those 1960s albums that still clutter used record shops and thrift stores to this day. Sure, she can sing, for example, "Somewhere" and "Memory" as if they were written for her. But it is when Barbra was pushed outside her usual musical theater borders, such as with the Guilty album, that she made her most enduring and interesting music.

    (More to come.)
     
  5. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    "Woman in Love," part 2:

    The trade papers awaited the first fruits of the Barbra Streisand/Barry Gibb collaboration with bated breath, and they were not disappointed.

    Record World had "Woman in Love" as one of its Page 1 single reviews in the September 6, 1980 issue: "This highly-anticipated collaboration with the Gibb's [sic] lives up to expectations with Barry & Robin giving Barbra luscious backing."

    Billboard, in its Top Single Picks on September 6, found it refreshing: "Streisand's last two gold hits were manic discotized [sic] throwaways, but here she softens the tempo for a restrained mid-tempo ballad. The Gibb sound is much in evidence, giving the record a dreamy pop air."

    Sometime before the beginning of September, Cash Box reconfigured its Singles Reviews page to focus more on new and developing artists, or those making a return after a long hiatus. For "legacy" artists, it started to list those songs, sans review, in a "Hits -- Out of the Box" section. "Woman in Love" was one of them in the September 6 issue.

    In none of the three was "Woman in Love" the lead review. That honor went to another first single from a highly anticipated album, "Real Love" by the Doobie Brothers. And in all four magazines, the new 45 by Michael McDonald & Co. debuted higher than Babs & Barry. The August 29, 1980 Radio & Records had it 26-29. It debuted September 6 in the other three, once the singles went on sale, and the relative debuts were 27-29 in RW, 31-34 in CB, and 40-49 in BB. "Real Love" ended up as a Top 10 hit in all four trades, but only in Radio & Records did it hit #1 (it peaked at #5 in Billboard, #7 in Cash Box, and #9 in Record World).

    Meanwhile, "Woman in Love" eventually overcame the Doobies' head start and became an across-the-board #1.

    It hit the top first in Radio & Records; "Woman in Love" dethroned "Real Love" in the October 17, 1980 issue and spent three weeks at #1 before it was toppled by Kenny Rogers' "Lady." In Billboard, the song peaked at #1 the week ending October 25 and stayed for three weeks; it knocked off "Another One Bites the Dust" by Queen and was replaced at the top by "Lady." In Cash Box, "Woman in Love" hit #1 in the November 1 edition and spent two weeks there; its bookends were the same as in Billboard and in the same order. In Record World, "Woman in Love" finally hit the top in its November 8 issue, knocking off "Another One Bites the Dust"; the very next week, it was once again beaten out by Queen's hit.

    Naturally, "Woman in Love" was an even bigger hit on the various adult contemporary charts. In Record World, it replaced "Lookin' for Love" by Johnny Lee at #1 in the October 4, 1980 edition; it was on top for six weeks before it was topped by another country crossover, "Lady" by Kenny Rogers. In Radio & Records, "Woman in Love" dethroned "Don't Ask Me Why" by Billy Joel in the October 10 issue; after six weeks at #1, "Lady" ended its reign. And in Billboard, "Woman in Love" spent five weeks at #1 starting the week ending October 11, replacing "No Night So Long" by Dionne Warwick at the top, until it was replaced by Rogers' "Lady." Curiously, both of those artists would receive Barry Gibb's golden production touch in the future.
     
  6. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Epic is indeed the word for both the single and the album, the latter of which exceeded expectations to the point where stores ran out of it! Hardly a dud on the entire album and the couple that to me (side 2) aren’t great have more to do with them simply not my preferred style, not that the songs themselves are bad. Not a bad time to continue being a Gibb fan. Oh, and by the way, excellent post as always. Have really enjoyed your posts.
     
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  7. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    "Woman in Love," Part 3:

    One of the nice things about having one's own pressing plants is that there are fewer variations to collect and/or obsess about. That said, it doesn't stop.

    Historically, the two most collectible artists in the world are Elvis Presley and The Beatles, both of whom, for the most part, recorded for U.S. labels that manufactured their own records (RCA Victor and Capitol, respectively). Even so, when one acquires even the most common 45s by those artists, one notices eventually that records pressed by one plant look different than those from another plant.

    For the most part, records from one pressing plant aren't worth any more than records from another, although -- stubbornly, I must say -- certain Elvis RCA 45s from 1956 to 1958 with a line on the label that cuts through the center at 10 and 2 o'clock are thought to be more rare than those of the same era without the line, and thus some dealers still charge a premium for them. I remember some of the early price guide compilers tried to bend over backwards to determine what made them special, when the only difference between those and the "no line" 45s is the pressing plant. The 45s with the line were made by RCA's plant in Rockaway, NJ; those without the line came from RCA's plants in either Indianapolis or Hollywood. And because the early price guide compilers lived, collected, and dealt on the West Coast, the Rockaway pressings, which were distributed primarily in the East, rarely crossed the Rockies and thus seemed to be more rare than the others. And thus a collecting fiction was born that still plays a role in pricing to this day, as much as I tried to dispel the idea that there is anything inherently more collectible about them.

    All this is my long-winded way of saying that, just because Barbra Streisand recorded for Columbia doesn't mean that there aren't label variations to make life interesting.

    ---

    "Woman in Love" backed with "Run Wild" was assigned the catalog number Columbia 1-11364. It was one of the last 45s on the label with the "1-" prefix, which indicated a list price of $1.49, though for the most part only mall stores actually charged full list at retail. The single was released at the tail end of August 1980, though promos probably came out a week early.

    The 45 rpm matrix number for "Woman in Love" was ZSS 167507 and for "Run Wild" was ZSS 167508. The CBS-label matrix numbers almost always were consecutive and bore no relationship to the album from which they came. "Woman in Love" has a listed time of 3:48; "Run Wild" is listed as 4:05.

    No copies distributed in the United States were issued with a picture sleeve.

    When the 45 was first released, a contractually required credit was missing, thus there are two distinct label variations. Regardless of which stampers Columbia's plants used to manufacture the 45s, the ones without the credit are first editions and the ones with the credit are second editions.

    Every copy of "Woman in Love" came from CBS Pitman, CBS Terre Haute, or CBS Santa Maria. Though by 1980, all three CBS pressing plants used the same set of fonts, the size and placement of the type sometimes varied. This is true of "Woman in Love." So, if one looks closely, one can find four distinct versions of the labels.

    The Pitman and Terre Haute labels are identical; one must examine the trail-off for a "T" or "P" to distinguish them. The Santa Maria labels have different type sizes and credit placement from their East and Midwest counterparts.

    Here are the four variations.

    1. First edition, Pitman and Terre Haute
    At the left side of the label, under the time, is the following, centered, more or less:
    Produced by
    Barry Gibb,
    Albhy Galuten,
    Karl
    Richardson
    for Barry Gibb
    Productions
    and Karlbhy
    Productions

    At the bottom, under the artist and title, is the following, centered:
    -B. Gibb - R. Gibb- Taken From The
    Columbia Lp: "GUILTY"
    FC 36750

    2. First edition, Santa Maria
    The left side of the label has only the word STEREO, the intro time, and the full time.

    At the bottom, under the artist and title, is the following, centered on five lines:
    -B. Gibb - R. Gibb- Taken From The Columbia Lp: "GUILTY" FC 36750
    Produced by Barry Gibb, Albhy Galuten, Karl
    Richardson for Barry Gibb Productions
    and Karlbhy Productions

    3. Second edition, Pitman and Terre Haute
    At the left side of the label, under the time, is the following, centered, more or less:

    Produced by
    Barry Gibb,
    Albhy Galuten,
    Karl
    Richardson
    for Barry Gibb
    Productions
    and Karlbhy
    Productions

    At the bottom, under the artist and title, are the following, centered:
    -B. Gibb - R. Gibb- Taken From The
    Columbia Lp: "GUILTY" FC 36750
    Executive Producer: Charles Koppelman
    for The Entertainment Co.

    4. Second edition, Santa Maria
    At the left side of the label, under the time, is the following, centered, more or less:
    Executive
    Producer:
    Charles Koppelman
    for The
    Entertainment
    Co.

    At the bottom, under the artist and title, are the following, centered on five lines:
    -B. Gibb - R. Gibb- Taken From The Columbia Lp: "GUILTY" FC 36750
    Produced by Barry Gibb, Albhy Galuten, Karl
    Richardson for Barry Gibb Productions
    and Karlbhy Productions

    Promo copies have white label with "Woman in Love" on both sides, stereo/stereo. The labels are variant 1 above, with one difference.

    In 1980, the CBS family of labels still did not put publishing information on stock copies of singles, an outdated tradition dating to the Great Depression -- the real one of the 1930s, that is. But on the promo 45s, it appears on the right as follows:

    Publisher:
    Stigwood
    Music, Inc
    (Unichappell
    Music, Admin.)
    (BMI)

    Most, if not all, promos came from Terre Haute.

    ---

    In 1989, "Woman in Love"/"Run Wild" was belatedly reissued on the Columbia Hall of Fame Series with the catalog number 13-68711. These have gray labels and bar codes and were newly typeset. Known copies are styrene and probably came from the CBS plant in Carrollton, GA, which opened in 1981.

    ---

    Previously, I mentioned that the RIAA, in an attempt to curb the abuse of the certification process, made record labels wait 120 days after release to have a new release certified Gold or Platinum. This change, which went into effect September 1, 1979, so sharply curtailed the certification of even legitimate hits that the industry started begging for a change almost immediately. Around August 1, 1980, the RIAA relented, shortening the certification window from 120 to 60 days.

    With that change made, the RIAA certified "Woman in Love" as a Gold single for sales of one million copies on November 7, 1980, a little more than two months after it was released. But even then, it appears as if some overproduction took place to get to that figure; a bunch of second-edition Pitman copies were sent overseas, where they were paired with paper-thin title sleeves and distributed mostly in the Benelux countries.

    On August 19, 1997, "Woman in Love" and four other Streisand singles were all retroactively certified Platinum by the RIAA. They had probably sold a few more copies in the years since they were awarded Gold records, but certainly not double what they had when first certified.

    In 1988 or so, the RIAA changed the certification levels for singles from 1,000,000 Gold/2,000,000 Platinum to the same levels as for albums (500,000 and 1,000,000). So Columbia re-submitted those five singles to the RIAA and had their status changed from Gold to Platinum without having to sell any additional singles. Neat, eh?
     
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  8. cut to the chase

    cut to the chase Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Germany
    The next three singles:

    Marcy Levy & Robin Gibb - Help Me! (1980)

    "Help Me!" is a song by Marcy Levy (better known now as Marcella Detroit) and Robin Gibb. The song was recorded for the official soundtrack of Times Square, and released as the album's lead single, going on to peak at #50 on the Billboard Top 100. It was also considered as Levy's first single and her only song that was charted in the United States.

    [​IMG]

    Released: September 1980
    Charts: #50 (USA)



    Background
    After working on Jimmy Ruffin's Sunrise (including the track "Where Do I Go", a duet by Ruffin and Marcy Levy) Robin Gibb and Bee Gees keyboardist Blue Weaver work together again by supplying tracks for the soundtrack of the film Times Square (an RSO movie). And the result was the song "Help Me!" sung by Levy and Gibb. The song was heard in the film's closing credits.

    Related session outtake, "Touch Me", a song also written by Gibb and Levy with lead vocals provided by Levy as a demo for Linda Clifford but was not recorded by Clifford himself. Weaver says he and Levy didn't like its sexually charged lyrics and Gibb had to talk Levy into singing it. The B-side of the single, an instrumental version of "Help Me!" on which they made two instrumental versions of the same track, one with Gary Brown playing a sax solo.

    It peaked #50 in the Billboard Hot 100, #65 in Cashbox and #64 in Record World. It was released in September 1980 elsewhere except in Australia when the song was released as a single there in November that same year.

    Help Me! (Marcy Levy and Robin Gibb song) - Wikipedia
     
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  9. cut to the chase

    cut to the chase Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Germany
    Barbra Streisand & Barry Gibb - Guilty (1980)

    "Guilty" is a vocal duet between Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb. The song was written by all three Bee Gees: Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb. Released as a single from Streisand's 1980 album of the same name. "Guilty" peaked at No. 3 on the US Billboard Hot 100 pop chart and No. 5 on the adult contemporary chart. In the UK, the song reached No. 34 on the UK Singles Chart. The single was certified gold by the RIAA. In addition, "Guilty" won a Grammy Award in the category Best Pop Vocal Performance, Duo or Group. The song also appeared on the 2001 Bee Gees compilation, Their Greatest Hits: The Record.

    There is also a version by Tom Jones and Gladys Knight. It is also used in the film Madea's Witness Protection.

    [​IMG]

    Released: October 1980
    B-side: Life Story
    Charts: #3 (USA), #34 (UK), #12 (New Zealand), #13 (Canada), #15 (Germany, Netherlands), #37 (Australia)



    Barry Gibb version
    "Guilty" is a song originally recorded by Barry Gibb as a guideline to Barbra Streisand for her album Guilty. On which Gibb on guitar, Blue Weaver on keyboard and Albhy Galuten on synthesizer.

    The demo however sounds like the others, and since Barry sings it in falsetto throughout he had probably not yet decided to make it a duet. (By contrast, parts of "What Kind of Fool" are natural voice.) It was said to have been the last song submitted for the album.

    Listen to Barry's version here: Barry Gibb - Guilty

    Guilty (Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb song) - Wikipedia
     
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  10. cut to the chase

    cut to the chase Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Germany
    Andy Gibb - Time Is Time (1980)

    "Time Is Time" is a song written by Andy and Barry Gibb. Andy Gibb performs this song and was released as a single in November 1980 and included on Andy Gibb's Greatest Hits. The B-side, "I Go for You" was originally from his 1978 album Shadow Dancing.

    [​IMG]

    Released: November 1980
    B-side: I Go for You
    Charts: #15 (USA)



    Background and release
    "Time Is Time" was recorded in the middle of 1980 at Middle Ear Studios in Miami Beach. It was credited to Andy himself with his brother Barry, but Andy said later that it was his own composition with one change by Barry. Its full ending, when the musicians stop, Andy continues to sing a few more words, and drummer Steve Gadd hits the hi-hat again, but when it was released, it ends with the fadeout.

    The song reached No. 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 29 on the US Adult Contemporary chart in 1980. The song appeared on his 1980 album, Andy Gibb's Greatest Hits and was the first single and one of the new songs on that album. as well as 2010's Mythology box set. The song was produced by Barry Gibb, Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson.

    It was edited for its single release with one less repeat of the chorus at the end. When it was appeared for the first time in CD format through the compilation Andy Gibb it fades out early at 3:41.

    Time Is Time - Wikipedia
     
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  11. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    "Guilty" is another great track. We tend to think of the Bee Gees careers - at least in the US - having come to an abrupt end with the demise of disco, but Guilty shows that wasn't exactly the case, and they'd continue to have success with and thru other acts into the middle of the '80s.

    I think the real surprise is they never managed to stage a major comeback on their own.

    Another surprise is how poorly this one did overseas. I'd have thought this would have been a bigger hit in Europe, where the Bee Gees in general didn't suffer from such a dramatic post-disco career collapse.
     
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  12. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    I have the Columbia half speed master of this and think it’s as good as it gets. However, since we get posts here about the different plants that press, does anyone have info on a better sounding version on vinyl? Normally Columbia pressings are decent, and quiet, but not with this title in my experience.
     
  13. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Quite surpirsed Guilty didn’t hit the top! However, it’s possible that by then people that wanted the song already had the album. Another outstanding song.
     
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  14. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Excellent song imo. Great sound too. I wish him and Barry would have gone back and produced one more album during that period, but as we know RSO dropped him and likely another label would not have touched him with all the personal issues going on. And I doubt Barry would have put in time until Andy straightened out. But, Time Is Time is a song that showed his maturity in his music and it would have been interesting to see what else could have been. I like the After Dark album, but I think this is a better quality song than most of the tracks from Dark.
     
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  15. Bobby Morrow

    Bobby Morrow Forum Resident

    I really like Time Is Time. It’s one of Andy’s best songs. Although it did OK in the charts, it was no match for his first few hits and the Bee Gees sound wasn’t as appealing to the public as it had been a couple of years before. I recall the single having a cold ending, but on the GH CD I have it fades out (as the OP said). The song is all there. You can just about hear the original cold ending it’s just that the sound has faded to almost nothing at that point. Considering how much I like the song and it’s original ending, the CD version has always annoyed me.:)
     
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  16. Bobby Morrow

    Bobby Morrow Forum Resident

    A big US hit, this didn’t fare so well in the UK. I do like it, but think it’s a little mundane compared to Woman In Love. I’m not so keen on the other full-on Barry duet, What Kind Of Fool, either.
     
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  17. ferdinandhudson

    ferdinandhudson Forum Resident

    Location:
    Skåne
    The wiki article fails to mention it but the Millennium Collection CD from 2001 does contain the full album version with the acapella ending and the final hi-hat.
    Andy Gibb - The Best Of Andy Gibb
     
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  18. Castle in the air

    Castle in the air Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Carolina
    Help Me is a really nice song but for 1980 it just did not fit,it was a little bit disco,a little bit pop and a little bit R&B without being able to figure out which it should be.

    Time Is Time has become my second favorite Andy song since it was mentioned here a while back,had forgotten all about it.
    The vocals are strong and it has all the hooks,if only Andy could have cleaned himself up and developed more as a songwriter.

    And Guilty...my least favorite of that Albums singles.
    I don`t hate it but it just does nothing for me,it just runs on repetitiously with nothing particularly interesting about it imo.
     
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  19. cut to the chase

    cut to the chase Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Germany
    I completely agree, it's quite a weak follow-up single to the excellent 'Woman in Love'. No wonder it didn't do well outside the US.
     
  20. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    I've always liked Guilty the best. It's great to hear Barry's regular singing voice but I guess it was inevitable since Streisand fulfill's the higher end function.
    I did not care for Time Is Time back then but it's grown on me over the years. Very cool number
    The Marcy Levy song, I got nothin'.
     
  21. cut to the chase

    cut to the chase Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Germany
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  22. torcan

    torcan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    This is the copy I have. I bought it new around '89 or '90, have only played it maybe 15 times and already the high notes are sounding very distorted. Same thing with a Neil Diamond promo of "Desiree". Some of those styrene copies really didn't hold up very well, did they? I'm on the hunt for a better quality copy.

    -----

    Re. the RIAA, it was actually at the beginning of 1989. I remember reading about it in Billboard. The reason they did this in the first place was because single sales had declined by '89. I think there were only two gold singles (or something like that) in '88. I found the way they did this to be idiotic. They should have put a rule that any single released in '89 or after would quality for the new certification rules and old one had to abide by the original rules; instead, they allowed labels to go back and re-certify old hits at the new levels. As a result, some gold singles sold 500,000 and others sold 1,000,000 - it's very difficult to know which is which.
     
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  23. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Really? I love the intro to it, that hypnotic pattern that continues thru the song. And her voice blends insanely well with The Bee Gees.

    She should do a whole album of Bee Gees covers in the style of Guilty...
     
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  24. Hadean75

    Hadean75 Forum Moonlighter

    I LOVE this song :love:. I actually picked up the soundtrack on vinyl so I could get a copy of it. Shame it's not available otherwise (aside from 45s I'm sure lol). Robin and Marcy Levy sounded great together. :agree:

    I'm not big on this song....except when the brothers sang it in concert lol. I'm just not big on Barbara Streisand lol. It's a fine song.

    Not really familiar with this one. It doesn't really impress me. :shrug:
     
  25. Jarleboy

    Jarleboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Norway
    I think "GUILTY" is the closest I get to a favourite from that album. I like each and every song, even the overlong "MAKE IT LIKE A MEMORY". But "GUILTY" opens the album, sets the tone and I sit back and enjoy the ride. Perhaps it´s partly because I know all the good songs I am minutes from hearing, but the title track is magical to me. Lovely.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019

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