SH Spotlight Benny Goodman on RCA-Victor, 1937, recorded in Hollywood, wonderful sounding records. Give a listen

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Steve Hoffman, Jan 17, 2016.

  1. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    I saw in the code that pic being taken in 1949. Makes sense - the RCA meatball logo variant in the front looks like it first came forth around 1944 or so (plus, pre-December 1942, the company administering Victor known as RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc.). 'Twas in the same year this photo was shot - '49 - that the RCA Hollywood plant began using Bert-Co to do their label typesetting, rather than getting it from Camden or Indianapolis of wherever the bulk of label type on RCA releases was done in those days. And a few doors up from here (at 1032 N. Sycamore), was the then-Radio Recorders Annex that later became Annex Studios. Of course, by then Goodman had gone first to Columbia (in '39 - I have a few of his records from there including the very first "red label" issue of Columbia as we know it today, #35201, "Comes Love" / "Rendezvous Time In Paree"), then to Capitol.

    I seem to recall all RCA studios including Hollywood, as of '37, using an early version of the Scully lathes built between 1934 and '37 that were later sold to other recording companies (from 1938 to the late '40's) as the Model 501. It would have presumably been that equipment on which these Goodman tracks that are the foci of this thread were first laid to wax.
     
    Dan C and ledsox like this.
  2. SteveS1

    SteveS1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Weald, England, UK
    I haven't come across anything on CD better than the 3CD Gold Remasters, they are not great but the music and the sense of occasion get through OK.
     
    Pettorano likes this.
  3. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    I have the CL 815 issue of one of the volumes. Two-eye red-label "MONO" as configured from late 1967 onwards, albeit printed on shiny paper with a shade of red resembling PMS 199. Only based on Side 2 plus the way the playing area was contoured (and the relatively lighter weight of the record, though a tad heavier than RCA's Dynaflex), I'd say the pressing I have was made in 1972 - evidently the Pitman plant still had those old two-eye monos laying around at that late date, grandfathered for pressing deep-catalogue LP's only after the red/orange "ring around" label was introduced in '70. (The newer design wasn't used on that album until after the last of the two-eye mono labels finally ran out.)
     
  4. seed_drill

    seed_drill Senior Member

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    I've got some fair options for 78 playback, a Dual CS 5000, a 78 stylus for my OM cartridge or a Grado mono cart with two 78 tips, and an H.H. Scott preamp with multiple EQ settings. But how do you filter out the shellac hiss without damaging the sound?
     
  5. feinstei9415

    feinstei9415 Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Bend, IN
    My acquisition of the McIntosh MT-5 turntable last year allowed me to unlock the fabulous sound on my large collection of '78's. I have a Shure V15 Type III cartridge mounted in it, so, in order to play '78's, I simply unplug my conical (Type "G") stylus and plug in the VN78 stylus (available in a very well done "modern" version available for about $37 on E-bay), and enjoy the magnificent sound.

    Although they are of a slightly later vintage (1937 thru 1946) than the Benny Goodman discs mentioned by our host, I love the sound of the Artie Shaw 1940's vintage '78's on RCA Bluebird (including the ever-popular "Begin the Beguine") that sound like the band is in the room with you. Although Mosaic did a fabulous job on their collection of these Artie Shaw '78's, their digital transfers just don't measure up to the original 78 RPM pressings, properly played back.
     
  6. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host Thread Starter

    I don't even bother anymore. My brain just filters it out. But if you are running on the post 1954 RIAA curve, you need to bump the mids at 3k a bit and start rolling off around 9k. If it really bothers you.. klark teknik.jpg
     
    WMTC, McLover and seed_drill like this.
  7. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    When in Hollywood, Shaw likewise used the 1016 N. Sycamore studios / pressing plant for recording.
     
  8. feinstei9415

    feinstei9415 Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Bend, IN
    Thanks for that information! Was 1016 N. Sycamore a "holy grail" of great recordings? Did Elvis ever record there (or was it gone by the time that he joined RCA)?
     
  9. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Apparently, if Our Host gives a thumbs-up to recordings made there in the late 1930's / early '40's period, it must've been a Holy Grail of something . . . but by the time Elvis was signed to the label, the Hollywood location of 1016 N. Sycamore was only a pressing plant, not a pressing plant / recording studio, and from about after World War II to 1959 RCA rented studio space at the main Radio Recorders studios on Santa Monica Blvd. (ironically enough, originally built for then-Victor in the late '20's) before opening "Music Centers Of The World," first on the grounds of the old NBC Sunset and Vine studios (actual given address: 1510 N. Vine St.) from 1959 to 1964, then to 6363 Sunset until January 1977. Elvis recorded on the 'Coast mainly at Radio Recorders, except for the March 1972 sessions at 6363 Sunset which yielded, among others, his last big hit "Burning Love." The N. Sycamore pressing plant continued to press LP's and 45's right up to 1976.
     
    stereoguy likes this.
  10. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Oh, and another classic recorded at the Sycamore outpost: Spike Jones' "Cocktails For Two." Right after the end of the first recording ban in 1944.
     
    Mister Charlie likes this.
  11. Chris C

    Chris C Music was my first love and it will be my last!

    Location:
    Ohio
    Love this thread and thank you for sharing those great sounding Youtube clips. Do you know off hand of any other songs that were recorded at RCA Hollywood, during that same time period and used the ribbon microphones like your two Benny Goodman examples did? I could listen to these type of songs all day, especially when they sound that good!

    Speaking of which, the other day I borrowed that "Bing Crosby Sings Again" CD from the library, that you put together on MCA years ago. That first cut, which was previously unreleased, "The Ol' Spring Fever", was a very pleasant sounding surprise! Hard to believe that one stayed buried in the vaults for so long?
     
  12. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host Thread Starter



    The Bing had a publishing issue, long forgotten, so I issued it. A "demo track" for sure.

    The Benny 78's are great, most everything from RCA-Victor in those years sounds good like that, some sound a bit better than others, but all are a satisfying musical experience. I paid as little as 25 cents for my Benny Goodman Victor's in 1980..
     
    McLover and Chris C like this.
  13. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host Thread Starter

    Oh, and Chris C, is prev. unissued "You Are Too Beautiful" on the Bing I did? I can't remember. If it is, give a listen, it was recorded as an "air check" during a dress rehearsal at the radio studio. On this YouTube version, you can here the PA System at CBS Columbia Square at :27. So neat, I use it to test midrange on systems. The best systems really make it obvious that his voice is being amplified in the studio at that point. Some systems have nothing at that point, others it sounds like he is suddenly in a large space, it's just the PA leaking into his vocal mic. Works so well as midband tester, I used to use it all the time to judge midrange capture...

    I think I'll start a thread on this..

     
    McLover likes this.
  14. Chris C

    Chris C Music was my first love and it will be my last!

    Location:
    Ohio
    Yes Steve, that song is on your comp! Nice work, as were the many that did for them. The good old days when someone who actually cared about the music, had the opportunity to put together products that were made with love and care. Between your work for MCA and what Ron Furmanek and Steve Kolanjian got accomplished at Capitol/EMI, with their great "Legends Of Rock & Roll" and "Capitol Collectors Series", those are all still some of my favorite CD's in my collection!
     
    McLover likes this.
  15. McLover

    McLover Senior Member

    Location:
    Athens, Tennessee
    P.S. 78 threads like this make me long for the completion of my Lenco L 70 restoration project. Which I hope to have completed in 2 months or so. Lenco is a vintage flat disc fanatic's best friend.
     
  16. Chris C

    Chris C Music was my first love and it will be my last!

    Location:
    Ohio
    Funny, but this past year I bought a DUAL 1219 turntable from Bill at "Fixmydual.com", that currently has a Ortofon 2M Blue cart on it and when I read that Steve was recommending earlier in this thread to another forum member, to just buy an old DUAL and get the SHURE cart that he has and he'd be all set. Well, I looked at Steve's equipment profile and found the SHURE cart, which sadly, is LONG out of production and is now going for lots of $$$'s, including the rare replacement stylus (Note to Steve: Better stock up now!). I also have two TECHNICS 1200 MK2's set up on other systems in the house and I really should have at least one of those moddied by KAB, for 78 RPM, as Steve has also recommended to all of us, in the past!

    Late edit: I just saw on Bill's "Fixmydual.com" website, that two of his 1219's are going to be featured on the upcoming HBO series, "Vinyl" in February! Good for Bill!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2016
  17. McLover

    McLover Senior Member

    Location:
    Athens, Tennessee
    Dual is fine, but is NO LENCO. Variable speed galore, manual, can have arm upgrades. Poor man's Garrard 301/401. Makes a Thorens TD 124 look like cost cut. And I am an idler Dual fanatic at that.
     
  18. Rick McQuiston

    Rick McQuiston Active Member

    Great old music. My mom used to play a lot of big band music when I was a kid. Love it. Where's a good place to look for good pressings of old Benny Goodman music? Glenn Miller too. Where do I find the Crosby "Too Beautiful" track? Discogs? Just did a quick search of the net and couldn't find much.
     
  19. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host Thread Starter

    http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threa...akers-using-bing-crosby.496472/#post-13719572
     
  20. misterjones

    misterjones Forum Resident

    Location:
    Andover, MA
    Just received six Benny Goodman RCA Victor 78s in the mail, all in excellent condition. I'm afraid to play them because it might turn me into a 78 junkie. Worse, it might make me depressed. After I compared my Bunny Bergian 78 to a quality LP version I wanted to cry. The 78 was that much better.
     
    WMTC likes this.
  21. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host Thread Starter

    Sad but true. Enjoy them anyway..
     
    WMTC and McLover like this.
  22. lennonfan1

    lennonfan1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    baltimore maryland
    Old thread but a pop in to say I love Goodbye on RCA 78. mellow and moving, I easily filter out the 78 noise in my head:)
     
    Steve Hoffman likes this.
  23. misterjones

    misterjones Forum Resident

    Location:
    Andover, MA
    I also do, but perhaps some cannot. I think years of listening to Yazoo blues CDs trained me very well in this regard.
     
    Steve Hoffman likes this.
  24. Zach Harski

    Zach Harski Member

    Location:
    New Jersey
  25. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host Thread Starter

    A Bump for Benny.
     
    zen, misterjones, TonyCzar and 2 others like this.

Share This Page

molar-endocrine