BlackkKlansman (new Spike Lee film)

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by townsend, May 14, 2018.

  1. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    Love that movie...
     
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  2. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

     
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  3. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    George Carlin was excellent! thanks I enjoyed that...Now I have to watch my DVD....love the use of the song "Landslide" I got choked up.....
     
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  4. Lightworker

    Lightworker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Kevin was pretty decent as the Baltimore-based 'dark web' hacker in that Die Hard franchise film...
     
  5. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    And that is a good thing for any movie to be. I attend movies to be entertained, not be lectured by social awareness.

    It is interesting how the current trend is to take something that occurred, perhaps in the heat of the moment, or perhaps not and revisit it entirely out of context in the social media some four decades, sometimes more later.

    Sheer asininity.
     
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  6. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    My post solely addressed the movies KS directed, not his acting in other works...
     
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  7. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    A well-made movie wouldn't "lecture" you - it'd make its points in a more subtle way.

    "Daisy" and "Green Book" come pretty close to lecture territory, IMO.

    Anyway, my point was that they're pleasant films but not what I'd consider to be great because they're too innocuous - they're cinematic comfort food...
     
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  8. Lightworker

    Lightworker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Whatever. It's really a Spike Lee thread, so tangential subjects are tangential subjects and 'off-thread' anyway.
     
  9. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    On the other hand Spike and Kevin are peers, two filmmakers who mostly operated on the fringes of the studio system who have made films of widely varying quality.
     
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  10. Lightworker

    Lightworker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    I like the way that "To Kill A Mockingbird" (1962) made its points about class disparity, the true nature of masculinity and the dangers of false rape allegations.
    There are some rather 'uncomfortable' moments contained therein. The racial elements were naturalistic to the setting and time period of the narrative and
    did not have the stilted "exaggeration for effect" that a contemporary re-telling of this story would no doubt highlight over these other thematic elements.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
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  11. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    Just me personally, a well made movie, only needs to tell a story. That being, what ever a story has to tell. It doesn't need to make any points.

    Never saw "Daisy", didn't seem to be anything that I would be interested in.

    Liked the Green Book. I did not see it coming close to be a lecture, but simply a good movie.

    I don't think that Green Book was great, but it was a very well made movie, which is all that I would expect it to be.
     
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  12. Lightworker

    Lightworker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Anybody remember the old Saturday Night Live parody skit: "Ridin' Miss Daisy"?
     
  13. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    Must have missed that one...
     
  14. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    One of the main criticisms of both films is that they just made certain audiences "feel good" about a not-so-good situation.
     
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  15. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    No, but I remember the p0rn parody Driving Miss Daisy Crazy.
     
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  16. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    They're movies. They are supposed to make audiences feel good. That is why audiences pay to go see movies.

    Movies, even movies like the Titanic, are only based upon historical situations, adapted to entertain.

    They are not intended as history lessons.

    But even history lessons depend on who is writing or more like, who is rewriting history.

    I see the movie more as being about the developing relationship between the two stars, than the events portrayed in the movie itself, which I saw more as the method to tell the story.
     
  17. PHILLYQ

    PHILLYQ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    It was from 'In Living Color':
     
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  18. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    Yeah, they do tend to give us a "soft" view of racism. "Do the Right Thing" was a much more challenging take on the topic than the warm 'n' fuzzy "Daisy".

    "Klansman" is less challenging than "DTRT" because it focuses on such an easy target: the KKK. "DTRT" included characters of a wide variety and didn't paint them in one-dimensional ways, whereas the racists in "Klansman" are cartoon characters.

    I think "Book" is more about challenging assumptions than fighting real racism. It's a pleasant little movie and reasonably uplifting but it doesn't break new ground or really challenge the status quo...
     
  19. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    It depends on the nature of the movie. I wouldn't expect a family comedy to make points, but if a movie deals with racism, then yeah - it needs to have a point of view and try to exhibit a purpose.

    The problem with films like "Daisy" and "Book" is that they simplify racism-related issues and make it too easy for viewers to avoid self-assessment. They're a warm hug that lets white people feel good about "progress" and don't really move the needle...
     
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  20. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    Not always. If every movie had a happy, feel-good ending, that'd be boring.

    Some people only want to see warm 'n' fuzzy movies, but that sounds mind-numbing to me. I want a range of stories - including some that end on notes that leave me sad/mad/etc...
     
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  21. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    That's the problem.
     
  22. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    I have a small stack of blu-rays and DVDs about racial issues sitting here waiting for me to be in the right mood to watch because I know i'm gonna get very angry when I do. But, I will watch them.
     
  23. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    Here, we are talking about a story that took place back in 1963.

    Since most of us have been somewhat familiar with history, just because a movie takes place during that period of time, we don't need to be repeating history over and over again.

    I think Green Book told it's story quite well.
     
  24. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    You mean, like most foreign films.
     
  25. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    I think some movies that deal with racism can - and should be - uplifting. If they show progress - ie, someone who learns to improve themselves - why shouldn't they go that way?
     
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