Burned CD-RW doesn't play in CD player

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by themusicman2000, Jun 27, 2020.

  1. themusicman2000

    themusicman2000 Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Massillon, Ohio
    I just burned a CD-RW earlier and I tried to play it in my RCA 5 disc changer, but it did not read the disc. I burned the CD at 4x speed, not an mp3 CD and I also included text so you can see the title on your CD player. I burned it in iTunes.

    Could anyone please help identify why this is happening? Anything helps and I'm happy to provide any more info.
     
  2. violarules

    violarules Forum Resident

    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Most standard CD players cannot read CD-RW's. This was a selling point of some CD players (including one in-car unit I had) about 20 years ago.
     
    Gaslight, Tim S, nosliw and 2 others like this.
  3. Harp Of Glass

    Harp Of Glass Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colorado
    The only thing I can think of is that the table of contents was not finalized.
     
  4. Sevoflurane

    Sevoflurane Forum Resident

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
    Disc not finalised or CD player unable to play CD-RW discs leading candidates, agreed.
     
    nosliw likes this.
  5. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    This is the correct answer. CD-R and CD-RW are two different types of discs. Although some audio CD players can read the content, in my experience, the vast majority cannot.
     
    All Down The Line likes this.
  6. peter312

    peter312 Forum Resident

    As violarules says, most CD players will struggle with CD-RWs. From memory, they’re only 20% to 25% of the reflectiveness of a stamped CD (CDRs are about 70%).
     
    nosliw likes this.
  7. themusicman2000

    themusicman2000 Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Massillon, Ohio
    Thank you guys. I will try and use a CD-R and hope it works on my CD player. How can I finalize a disc in iTunes if all goes wrong?
     
  8. harby

    harby Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR, USA
    People are again confusing data disc multi-write terminology with CD-DA. You don't finalize a disc or incrementally change data and write a new filesystem TOC. You do close the session.

    If you want the highest compatibility, you burn disc-at-once (also called session-at-once), where one nonstop data stream is written to the pregroove on the blank disc. For highest quality disc (to ensure BURN-proof technology is never needed), it's better to have converted all your audio files to 44.1/16 uncompressed PCM audio, instead of having your software decode in realtime to make a disc.
     
  9. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    That has no bearing on anything. BURN-proof is a buffering system to prevent buffering underrun errors during the burning process. The way every burner using it in the last decade works is assuming a BURN-proof compatible application is used, if the buffer is empty, it pauses the burning process until it's replenished. Prior to that, a constant stream of data was necessary to guarantee for a burn to work. Having no more data to pump through would cause the aforementioned error, resulting in the disc being a coaster.

    BURN-proof should always be used regardless of what is burned. There is no need to jump through additional hoops and pre-convert the files.
     
  10. harby

    harby Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR, USA
    It is a system not to prevent buffer underruns, but to prevent a coaster when they happen. It will prevent a bad disc, but it does that by turning off the laser with the disc still spinning under, and then going back to near the original location and resuming.

    BURN-proof takes advantage of the Orange Book (recordable CD) specification that allows up to 100 micrometers between sectors. Not the way to ensure a low error count and glitch-less low-jitter playability on audio transports.

    [​IMG]

    On modern hardware it is unlikely you get a buffer underrun anyway, but you can lower the chance with lower burn speeds. I have yet, though, to see a GUI CD burning application that will report how many BURN-Proof events happened to prevent a coaster...
     
    Mbe likes this.
  11. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    All this is irrelevant as it has nothing to do with the quality of an audio copy and your idea that it'd have any impact whatsoever on it.
     
  12. curbach

    curbach Some guy on the internet

    Location:
    The ATX
    You really should use a program other than iTunes to burn a cd in my experience. There are a lot of free ones out there that will do a better job.
     
    qwerty and Strat-Mangler like this.
  13. themusicman2000

    themusicman2000 Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Massillon, Ohio
    What exactly do you find wrong with iTunes? Does it not burn as accurately or something?
     
  14. First get Verbatim CD-RW's made in Taiwan,they're the most reliable ones now. Second, use ImgBurn or Nero. Third, burn at x2 or even at x1 if the disc or the drive support this.
     
  15. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Yeah, hunt down and purchase a very specific CD-RW and burn with some complicated software instead of just jamming a a blank CD in your drive and burning with iTunes.
     
    superstar19 likes this.
  16. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    Old myth.
     
    Micke Lindahl likes this.
  17. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    Once again, bringing nothing of value to a thread. At least, you're consistent.
     
    Micke Lindahl likes this.
  18. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Like you’re always a ray of sunshine.
     
  19. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    Don't foolishly compare our post history. It's immediately verifiable that I help people constantly while you almost exclusively post sarcastic put-downs.

    Try behaving differently for once and I'll stop calling you out on it.
     
    Micke Lindahl and Chilli like this.
  20. BruceS

    BruceS El Sirviente del Gato

    Location:
    Reading, MA US
    I have made hundreds of both CD-R and CD-RW discs using the iTunes "Burn Playlist to Disc" feature. iTunes automatically finalizes the disc. CD-R is playable on more CDP/CDC units than is CD-RW, as has been already noted. Some standalone players or changers can be finicky even with a CD-R. For burn speed in iTunes, I normally use Maximum Possible.
     
  21. Pastafarian

    Pastafarian Forum Resident

    In my experience RW CDs are harder to read and I've presumed this is due to burn errors, for CD-Rs this can occur and I used Nero DiscSpeed, which will show if you've got CRC errors and it's free, I also found after rewriting play back problems increase.
    Download Nero DiscSpeed - MajorGeeks
     
  22. Solitaire1

    Solitaire1 Carpenters Fan

    I've had issues with trying to play a burned CD with my old Philips five-disc CD changer. From what I understand, older CD players (one intended only to play standard pressed CDs) aren't sensitive enough to read burned discs. Since then, I've made sure that any CD player I've purchased is specifically designed to handle both CD-Rs and CD-RW. However, I avoid using CD-RW discs because of reliability issues, specifically I've tried to erase and reuse a CD-RW and it tends not to work.

    Someone mentioned about burning speed. I use a DVD drive to burn CD-Rs and it burns at 10X (the slowest speed available) and I've had no problem with burned discs. When setting up tracks for burning, I use MediaMonkey where I make a playlist, set up the arrangement of files on the disc (all in one folder, or a folder for each album), and burn the disc (if there are two many files for a single it warns you so you can make adjustments if needed).
     
  23. Sevoflurane

    Sevoflurane Forum Resident

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
    I don’t burn many CDRs any more and have only occasionally used CDRWs [due to playback issues with older CD players]. I haven’t had any issues using iTunes for disc burning. I don’t worry as much about burning speed as buffer underrun issues are much less likely to happen with a faster modern PC than was the case when I first burned CDRs 20 years ago.
     

Share This Page