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Classical Corner Classical Music Corner (thread #44)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, Jan 5, 2013.

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  1. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
  2. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Now finishing up the Beethoven Piano Concerto recording (Muti conducting) in this box. The tempos in the first movement were downright sluggish and the finale lacks some pep as well. Avoid.
     
  3. spideyjack

    spideyjack Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Indianapolis
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    Harry Partch and John Cage
    New World Records Anthology Of American Music 1978

    This compilation is one of my favorites as it features Partch performing songs on his adapted guitar. The title reminds me of The Beatles and Frank Infield On Stage. Apparently Harry and John were suspicious of each other and never collaborated.
     
  4. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    After much sampling and comparing (with the Abbado and the Bohm sets, the latter I already own) on Spotify, I was compelled to order this terrific set. I imagine it is news to no one that this set is energetic, refreshing and exciting. Apparently the conductor when back to the original scores, before they were silently altered after the composers death. In many movements, Bohm sounds downright mushy and plodding next to this set. I urge anyone with Spotify to check it out.
     
  5. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I can well imagine Harnoncourt cooking up a snappy Great C Major. I'd be interested in Harnoncourt's take on the last two symphonies, rarely listen to the other six symphonies.
     
  6. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Your last comment makes me want to suggest this set even more strongly. I suspect Harnoncourt could have you listening to them much more often.
     
  7. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Now enjoying the Mozart Violin sonata recordings (with Kagan) from this box. Everytime I listen to Mozart, I feel as if everything will be alright. His music has this soothing, anti-depressant quality for me.
     
  8. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    Harnoncourt2.jpg
    This is one of the best versions of the "Unfinished" Symphony IMO and it is OOP. I bought the CD probably 15-20 years ago ...
     
  9. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
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    Enjoying some 400-year-old dance music this Sunday morning.
     
    Robin L likes this.
  10. Tangledupinblue

    Tangledupinblue Forum Resident

    Location:
    London, UK
    Just listening to this very enjoyable concert on BBC Radio 3, which includes (shamefully for me) only the second listen of Beethoven's wonderful Violin Concerto in its entirety. Here's the full program here, which includes Brahms's 4th (and my favourite) symphony:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01qqfhm

    I was very familiar with this work because it crops up frequently in radio concerts but I have never owned a recording or up to until relatively recently had made much of an conscious effort to listen to it attentively. However, the first listen won me over to what a great work it is, and the second provided confirmation if ever it were needed, that this, along with the Eroica, Pastoral and Choral symphonies, the last two piano concertos, the last four piano sonatas and the Archduke Trio (still haven't really explored the string quartets) this has be one of his greatest masterworks (even if I personally like Mendelssohn's and Tchaikovsky's violin concertos even more). Beethoven tends to be a composer I respect more than love; I'm less drawn to his brusque and blunt manner than the more refined harmonic and lyrical sophistication of Schubert and sometimes find his trademark triumph against adversity a bit crude and blatant, but there are works where he can as charming and melodic as anyone, the Pastoral (which is my favourite Beethoven symphony) and this piece being supreme examples.

    What I find particularly striking is the opening movement is its sheer length and spaciousness, like that of the Eroica, completely unprecedented in the concerto literature; it must have had a profound influence on so many romantic concerto composers, as I hear anticipations of Brahms and Tchaikovsky decades on. While I'm not one who counts Beethoven as among the proto-romantics as his harmonic language is still rooted in the classical idiom, this movement has a breadth and dreamy lyricism that was practically the blueprint for the more expansive symphonic and concerto writing of the much of the 19th century and beyond, often exploiting the singing qualities and high notes of the violin that has tended to make this genre starting with this work predominantly romantic in nature, even from normally abrasive 20th century composers like Bartok and Hindemith. I had to do a detailed analysis of the harmonic and tonal scheme of the first few minutes of this work during my first year of a music degree, including the first minute or so after the violin makes its entry, and it was very rewarding many years later on to finally listen to this work properly, proof that contrary to popular myth, analysis doesn't ruin music as long as it's great music. Apparently Beethoven didn't write his own cadenza; it would be interesting to find out who composed it for this particular performance, because although very nice, it sounds a bit too romantic and advanced in violin technique to have been written in or close to Beethoven's day. Are certain cadenzas widely favoured over others?

    If this rest of the work doesn't hit this movement's heights, it's still great in its own way in providing the much needed relaxing in intensity but not at the cost of inspiration, with a profoundly serene Larghetto providing a nice breather between the outer movements, to one of Beethoven's good-humoured 6/8 finales in an uplifting and very satisfying conclusion.

    So - I imagine quite a few CMC regulars must have at least one recording of this masterpiece - any recommendations would be much appreciated!
     
  11. scompton

    scompton Forum Resident

    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I just did a quick look and I have 5 versions in my unplayed list in iTunes. Zehetmair/Bruggen from the Philips box, Heifetz/Toscanini from the Toscanini box, Huberman/Szell, Szigeti/Walter and Kreisler/Blech all from a a lot of Naxos Historical discs I bought on eBay.

    I also own Janine Jansen/Jarvi from the Decca box, Tetzlaff/Zinman from a Sony Beethoven box, Mutter/Karajan, and Heifetz/Munch.

    My favorites are Tetzlaff/Zinman and Heifetz/Munch.
     
  12. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying the Borodin/Richter recording of the Schubert Trout in this box.
     
  13. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I second the Heifetz/Munch.

    I also like the Piano Version with Barenboim on DG. :hide:
     
  14. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    No need to hide under the chair George, we know you relate to keyboards more than fingerboards. :) Actually, I didn't know ther was a piano version.
    I third the Heifetz/Munch. My go to:

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    I should own the Living Stereo SACD of the Beethoven, but the SQ of this 1955 recording on Red Book CD is just fine. On this, Heifetz plays his adaptation of the Auer cadenza, which I think easily rivals the excellent Kreisler version.

     
  15. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    20th Century Masterpieces

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    CD16
    1991
    Marcel Landowski
    Adagio cantabile
    for string orchestra (Grand Plateau du Conservatoire National Supèrieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris,1996)
    Ensemble Orchestral de Paris
    Marcel Landowski
    1992-3
    Mark-Anthony Turnage
    Drowned Out
    (Symphony Hall, Birmingham, 1994)
    City of Birmingham City Orchestra
    Sir Simon Rattle
    1994
    Alfred Schnittke
    Minuet
    (Studio103, Radio France, Paris,1995)
    Gidon Kremer, violin
    Yuri Bashmet, viola
    Mstislav Rostropovich, cello
    1995
    Nicholas Maw
    Dance Scenes
    (No.1 Studio, Abbey Road, London, 1995)
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Daniel Harding
    1997
    Thomas Adès
    Asyla
    (Symphony Hall, Birmingham, 1998)
    City of Birmingham Orchestra
    Sir Simon Rattle
    So if Boulez opposed a composer in the mid-sixties, you know the music is less challenging to the ears than most ‘serious’ music of its day. Not that this piece is some throw-back to music from more genteel Classical times; on the contrary, this is pure 20th century. This 9-minute adagio is a moody mostly atonal piece that evokes the night music of Bartok. It is most interesting and enjoyable.

    The Turnage is a more turbulent, yet listenable combination quiet reflection and smoldering colors of dark intensity. Chief among its assets is the varied orchestral colors and textures the composer achieves.

    Schnittke has been mentioned before in these threads. This little 3-minute minuet kind of goes by without making much of an impression on me. Perhaps this composer warrants more of my attention in the future?

    British composer Nicholas Maw’s is a familiar story: after experimenting with serialism, he eventually arrived at his own brand of modern post-Romanticism. This may be completely personal, but there are parts of his Dance Scenes that remind of William Walton. Yet Maw takes Walton into the late 20th century and beyond with imaginative harmonic and rhythmic figures. From what I read, this isn’t Maw’s most important work.

    I’m not good enough to come up with an adequate account of this Adès work. From its very beginning, with its imaginative use of multiple cowbells, you know you’re in for a singular musical experience. This 4 movement 22+ minute piece is completly atonal and at times very dissonant, but Adès marshals the large orchestra’s infinite instrumental combinations in a way that keeps things pleasantly inventive without being caustic. If there’s actual form to these movements, it’s not obvious to me. What you do hear is a succession of completely original musical ideas that evoke stimulation and wonder.

    This is the last disc of this box. I have concluded this to be the best $24 investment I’ve made in recent times.
     
    dajokr likes this.
  16. Collector Man

    Collector Man Well-Known Member

    I loathe the piano version of the Beethoven Violin Concerto.
     
  17. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    A great set. I have that and the Colin Davis sets.
     
  18. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    Now playing DVD1 from the following twofer for a first watch ... ;D
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  19. dajokr

    dajokr Classical "Mega" Box Set Collector

    Location:
    Virginia Beach, VA
    [​IMG]

    Found this inside one of my old Van Cliburn CDs. I was gathering them to trade them in after getting the new box set. Glad I thought to have a look! (Was a fabulous recital, BTW).
     
    Scott Wheeler likes this.
  20. Tangledupinblue

    Tangledupinblue Forum Resident

    Location:
    London, UK
    I posted quite a bit about Schnittke in post #957 of CMC thread #43, and perhaps you missed my offer of posting the entry on Schnittke from my guide to 20th century composers, which contains a number of worthy recommendations. Well, here it is, hope you can read it!

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    John S and PH416156 like this.
  21. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    Now playing DVD1 from the following twofer for a first watch ... ;D
    [​IMG]
     
  22. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    You can always be counted on for your honesty. I appreciate that.
     
  23. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I bet if we each took a photo of our collections, they'd be a mirror image of each other.
     
  24. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I should have said that the Heifetz/Munch is the only version I have heard that I liked, though I think I have only heard a few others.
     
  25. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    Probably a lot of matches. You probably have more piano stuff though. :)
     
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