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Classical Corner Classical Music Corner (thread #51)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, Nov 3, 2013.

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  1. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
    *cough* Pollini *cough*
     
  2. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    In what sense?
     
  3. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
    Talking about badly recorded/mastered piano in digital.
     
  4. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    Odd . . . I'm not at all fond of his piano tone, analog or digital. Having never heard the man in situ, I have no idea if the sound I hear on his DGG records is the sound he makes in concert. Always sounds like bad solid state to me. Love his Schoenberg disc by the way. Another pianist that has attracted bizarre engineering choices is Alexis Weissenberg. There's an EMI collaboration with HvK/Berlin where the piano sounds like it's 18 feet long and made of solid aluminum.
     
    Fafner88 likes this.
  5. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
    I don't know what his piano tone is like, but his DGG early recordings of Chopin etc. are virtually unlistanable because of the way they were recorded.

    LOL, your description of Weissenberg's recordings with Karajan is very accurate. I'm a fan of the Beethoven concerto cycle, but I have to admit that the piano was indeed recorded very oddly. The orchestra sounds glorious though.
     
    Robin L likes this.
  6. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I was lucky enough to record and meet Peter Serkin. He has an exceptional quality of touch that eludes the microphone. I have not heard his father in concert, but the tone Rudolf Serkin produced was not congenial to the microphone. The instruments and music with the farthest dynamic extremes—Dramatic Sopranos, Virtuoso music for grand piano—are the most likely to blow out a microphone, overload it with too much level. And a piano has an unusual complexity of sound. Not an easy instrument to get right. I've had my best luck by using a pair of small diaphragm omnis spaced about 30 inches apart and about four feet up, positioned at the tail of the instrument, about a foot or two from the instrument. Plenty of bass, the image "centers" itself in your stereo-opticon, providing a more realistic presentation.
     
    bluemooze, RiRiIII and Fafner88 like this.
  7. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
    Interesting, is this recording available on a commercial CD?
     
  8. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
    Hands down, the best Tintagel out there.

    bax.jpg
     
  9. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
  10. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
  11. sgb

    sgb Senior Member

    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    Add Kempff and Anda to that list; Richter is often right at the line, and I mean in both analog and digital.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013
  12. 5-String

    5-String μηδὲν ἄγαν

    Location:
    Sunshine State
    Speaking of well recorded piano cds, here's one that tops my list. Rachmaninov's ghost playing some of his music.

    [​IMG]

    NB: My recommendation is only for the sound quality of this cd and not for the zenph re-performance.
     
  13. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    I have that and will listen to it tonight.
     
  14. sgb

    sgb Senior Member

    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    Of late I've moved to the digital sound for best piano reproduction. It has already been mentioned that wow and flutter degrade piano — and other stringed instruments, often — tremendously. I maintain, too that the quality of one's home playback equipment is crucial to satisfactory piano sound.
     
    5-String likes this.
  15. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Anyone with a favorite Ravel Daphnis and Chloe to recommend?
    I have this as my one-and-only, and I like it well enough, except for the fact that the whole nearly one hour work is indexed on one track (3 suites). This isn't a deal breaker as I tend to listen to it all straight through. Audio is acceptable, in spite of its early digital provenance. Performance wise I can't fault it, but I don't have a lot of listening experience:

    [​IMG]

    I see you can still get the Munch/Boston SACD cheap, and of course the Monteaux/London 1959 recording is supposed to be THE ONE.....
    I'm also curious about more modern accounts.
     
  16. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    The Munch would be my recommendation, John.
     
  17. Fafner88

    Fafner88 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Haifa, Israel
    Among modern recordings I recommend very much Boulez/BPO and Abbado/LSO. The Dutiot is also a fine recording.
     
  18. alankin1

    alankin1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philly
    Gustav Mahler – Symphony No.2 "Resurrection" (Movement I, II-V), Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen
    — Maureen Forrester, contralto, Emilia Cundari, soprano — New York Philarmonic & Westminster Choir, John Finlay Williamson, chorus master — Bruno Walter (Sony Classical)

    Gustav Mahler – Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen
    — Mildred Miller, mezzo-soprano — Columbia Symphony Orchestra — Bruno Walter (Sony Classical)


    [​IMG]
     
    John S likes this.
  19. sgb

    sgb Senior Member

    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    My favorite is the overlooked Martinon, which has state of the art sound as a lagniappe. Monteux's famous recording with the LSO would be my second choice for a recording of all 3 suites.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  20. TeacFan

    TeacFan Forum Resident In Memoriam

    Location:
    Arcadia, Ca.

    I have been collecting the (small) HP series as they are usually inexpensive & OOP. Just got the above Ravel & plan on listening tonight.
     
  21. alankin1

    alankin1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philly
    The New York School (hat ART)
    Earle Brown – Folio, Music for Cello and Piano
    John Cage – Variations I, Seven Haiku, Solo for Flute, Alto Flute, and Piccolo
    Morton Feldman – Projection 1, Extension 3, Intersection 4, Duration 2
    Christian Wolff – For Prepared Piano, For 1- 2- or 3 People

    Eberhard Blum, flute, Frances-Marie Uitti, violincello, Nils Vigeland, piano


    [​IMG]
     
  22. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    [​IMG]

    +

    [​IMG]

    +

    buynow1click.gif
    =

    OOPS.....​
     
    George P likes this.
  23. john greenwood

    john greenwood Senior Member

    Location:
    NYC
    just sampled the disc with the two Brahms sonatas. Sounded all right to me.
     
  24. 5-String

    5-String μηδὲν ἄγαν

    Location:
    Sunshine State
    I agree that it sounds alright but there is something I don't like about the way the violin sounds. There is no warmth or much of a woody tone (for lack of a better word). Maybe I am splitting hairs here but I was wondering if this is the way RCA captured it in the recording, that's why I was asking about the LP, or if it's because of the mastering.
     
  25. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I think it's the violinists tone. That guy doesn't have the sweetest tone.
     
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