Classical Corner Classical Music Corner (thread #69)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, Apr 12, 2015.

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  1. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
  2. Fastnbulbous

    Fastnbulbous Doubleplus Ungood

    Location:
    Washington DC USA
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    Such a cute couple...
     
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  3. Scott Wheeler

    Scott Wheeler Forum Resident

    Location:
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    He's good. Real good.
     
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  4. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Lord of the strings

    Location:
    CA
    Yes, they are the first chair players. I love this recording--the mic placement is close enough to capture every detail, but the sound is also spacious--a nearly perfect balance to my ears.
     
  5. 5-String

    5-String Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sunshine State
    Yeah, mine is the second pressing with the red label. I got it for a few pennies (or should I write drachmas) at an estate sale in Greece back in the mid nineties. It sounds fantastic, this is one of the most realistically sounding violin recordings that I have ever heard.
     
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  6. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    While I have a good number of recordings by great Russian pianists, I hardly have any recordings by great Russian violinists ...
     
  7. vanhooserd

    vanhooserd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville,TN
    Nice. I have it on a 2-CD EMI 'artist profile' set from 1993. Recorded 11/59, Salle Wagram. Producer: Norbert Gamsohn. Engineer: Roger Ducourtieux. The Beethoven VC was recorded at the same sessions.
     
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  8. vanhooserd

    vanhooserd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville,TN
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    CBS Records compilation from 1990. Go ahead & wallow in the lush melodies.
     
  9. vanhooserd

    vanhooserd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville,TN
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    Wallow some more...you know you want to. Recorded 9 & 10/74, Philharmonie. Producer: Michel Glotz. Engineer: Wolfgang Gulich. 1998 MHS version of an EMI CD reissue from 1992.
     
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  10. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    That technical 'uncleanliness' is attributable to lack of practice prior to recording. The 'Waldstein' recording indicates that Schnabel had technique to burn if he wanted to.
     
  11. Citroen

    Citroen vinylholic

    Some original DECCA classics.

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    Mahler Symphony No 1, Solti, LSO


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    Rachmaninov 3rd Piano Concerto, Ashkenazy, Fistoulari, LS


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    Brahms, Katchen Op117, Op118 & 119
     
  12. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I feel that Schnabel's "passion over technique" style is perhaps the style that is best suited for Beethoven's music. He is not my favorite Beethoven pianist, but after all these years his playing remains unique and incredibly special.
     
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  13. Scott Wheeler

    Scott Wheeler Forum Resident

    Location:
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    I gravitate towards pianists that don't have to sacrifice one for the other. They are rare
     
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  14. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Indeed they are!

    However, I think in the case of Beethoven, Schnabel's struggle with the notes and his urgency mirrors the struggle the composer's struggle and urgency. Much as I love Gulda's way with Beethoven, his flawless technique seems to highlight the drawbacks of it for this music. I hear little urgency and struggle in his interpretations. There is a mixture of spontenaity, excitement, brusqueness, passion and struggle in Schnabel's interpretations that I treasure, as I don't hear this in other pianists's Beethoven.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
  15. 5-String

    5-String Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sunshine State
    I received this collection yesterday and I listened to the first CD this morning before I went to work.

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    These recordings are from the late 60s to mid-70s, Neumann recorded these works again digitally later on. I am not sure what to think about this collection yet. I 've only listened to Symphony No 1 and did not like the sound quality or the performance. Hopefully the rest of the symphonies will be better.
     
  16. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Lord of the strings

    Location:
    CA
    Mozart, Faure, and Previn Sonatas this morning.

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    [​IMG]
     
  17. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I hear it in Annie Fischer's Beethoven. Was listening to some of the early sonatas performed by Annie Fischer just last night—the entire cycle is loaded up on my I-Pod. There is a sense of urgency in her performances that is similar to Schnabel's. Her approach was to throw it to the wall, see if it sticks, assemble later in the editing stage. Her tonal world also is much closer to Schnabel's, sharp-edged and not really 'pretty'. Tonally, Arrau's the 'prettiest' but there's a price to be paid as regards spontaneity and visceral impact. Have a hard time listening to Gulda at all, the sense of wrestling with the music is mostly absent in his approach.
     
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  18. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    All great points, Robin (as usual.)

    I need to hear Annie's set again soon. I still say there are things about Schnabel's approach that make his Beethoven unique to this day. Having said that, yes, Annie comes closest to Schnabel, even being more consistent and not having some of his other shortcomings. (This is why she's still my favorite for the LvB sonatas.)
     
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  19. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    Have all but the Volume 8 of the Naxos issue of Schnabel's Beethoven Sonatas. Have the Hammerklavier on an old RCA LP, no copy of his dreadful Op. 101, #28, A maj. sonata. Probably all for the best. Managed to buy the CD reissue of the Diabelli Variations and the RCA Op. 109 & 111 in the 'Great Pianists' 2-fer series, just before Rasputin's got rid of all Classical CDs over $2 a pop.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
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  20. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Began a journey through this set this morning. It's even more lovely than I had remembered.
     
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  21. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    Totally agree, Perahia's Mozart concertos - and many of his other interpretations for that matter - are often unjustly dismissed as being too shallow (or descriptions to that effect).
     
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  22. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    Exactly my problem with Gulda's interpretations. I never understood why people like them so much. To my ears his readings are too "literal"; no emotion/feeling/depth.
     
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  23. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I think Perahia's strengths are best utilized in Mozart.
     
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  24. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    True, but I also like his Schubert and Schumann - when I'm in the mood for those interpretations. I'm not very familiar with his Chopin, but his Sony set is on the way and should remedy that.
     
  25. Scott Wheeler

    Scott Wheeler Forum Resident

    Location:
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    Seeing her tonight with Lynn Harrell and Yefim Bronfman.
     
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