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Classical Corner Classical Music Corner (thread #8)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by -Alan, Feb 1, 2010.

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  1. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    I doubt it. And that's a good thing.
     
  2. fredhammersmith

    fredhammersmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    same set as this one I guess...
     

    Attached Files:

  3. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Yes, but cheaper. :righton:
     
  4. Baron Von Talbot

    Baron Von Talbot Well-Known Member

    Indeed - also the Sonato No. 3 Scherzo, the moment when all hell breaks lose at the Carnegy Hall and the audience can't wait for the reverb to finish and scream Bravo ! There is something unique aboot this guy - he was just 19 when he played these Chopin compositions like he was born for it with a natural tone and instinct. I never heard any other piano sound so large and powerhul esp. in the bass region. When he starts summing up energy in the lower registers the music gets extremely powerful. The Steinway was recorded perfectly and so you can understand why a grand piano, like an organ can rival a whole symphonic orchestra. But the real good side of his playing is that he never (at least not at that occason) exaggerates. He can go on for 20 minutes with the Mazurkas or the Nocturnes and play pianissiomo with the same strength barely hitting the keys , but just kind of easily slide on them. A stunner - his technique is perfect. As a 12 year old he was a complete artist and although he cites Bach as his spiritus rector, it is Chopin that comes to him naturally. Those guys in Warsawa knew exactly why they called him to play for the anniversary and that was actually the first time I heard of him. Somehow it seems he just doesn't get the wide recognition others get. Maybe he is too young or simply way too good and so it is unfair to compare him to any of the other great Chopin players and he still is a young man.
     
  5. Bogey

    Bogey Spy Vinyl User

    Location:
    Colorado
    Some radio listening this morning while I tried to burn a bit of fat riding the bike:

    7:37 am Johann Molter: Trumpet Concerto #1 in D MNV 4,13
    English Chamber Orchestra / Raymond Leppard
    Wynton Marsalis, trumpet
    Sony 39061

    7:51 am Jean Sibelius: Scenes historiques I: Festivo Op. 25
    New Zealand Symphony Orchestra / Pietari Inkinen
    Naxos 570068

    8:02 am Antonin Dvorak: Slavonic Dance #7 in c Op 46
    Atlanta Symphony Orchestra / Yoel Levi
    Telarc 80497

    8:06 am Manuel de Falla: Seven Popular Spanish Songs: Jota
    Cello Ensemble / Keri-Lynn Wilson
    Shauna Rolston, cello
    CBC Records 1175

    8:09 am Ambroise Thomas: Raymond: Overture
    Montreal Symphony Orchestra / Charles Dutoit
    London 421527

    8:18 am Arthur Honegger: Souvenir de Chopin
    Jonathan Plowright, piano
    Hyperion 67803

    8:21 am Johann Strauss II: Emperor Waltz Op 437
    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra / Georges Pretre
    Decca 10611

    8:34 am Luigi Boccherini: Octet (Notturno) in G Op 38/4 G 470
    Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra / Jeanne Lamon
    Sony 53121
     
  6. Bogey

    Bogey Spy Vinyl User

    Location:
    Colorado
    Now:

    [​IMG]

    Flipped a coin and the 1955 set won the toss.
     
  7. john greenwood

    john greenwood Well-Known Member

    Location:
    NYC
    You're a better (or at least more classical) man than I. My treadmill workout is to the Stones, Aerosmith, J. Geils etc.
     
  8. Don't know who originally recommended it but many thks. :righton:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Hope you found a match. ;)
     
  10. fredhammersmith

    fredhammersmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    I don't know Chopin really, but I have Ashkenazy boxset and Barenboim Nocturnes. And Andre Watts paino concertos.

    You have any advice on what to listen 1st? Sometimes, one piece of music is all it needs to click.
     
  11. john greenwood

    john greenwood Well-Known Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Mine arrived last night. Looks fantastic.
     
  12. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I'd start with the Ashkenazy Nocturnes. It's got that "deep plush" sound.
     
  13. john greenwood

    john greenwood Well-Known Member

    Location:
    NYC
    The Nocturnes are the epitome of romantic piano music, but from what I'm told Barenboim is not the best. Ashkenazy is probably better, but I'm not the biggest fan of his Chopin. (Sorry to be so negative, but I really want it to click :) ) I'd recommend Moravec which is really special. Second choice would be Rubinstein.
     
  14. Bogey

    Bogey Spy Vinyl User

    Location:
    Colorado
    [​IMG]

    Sonata No. 2, Op. 19


    Thanks again, George.
     
  15. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I've got the Rubinstein, have owned the Moravec Connoisseur Society recordings on LP—is there a CD?—and I think the Ashkenazy Nocturnes are something special. I am a big fan of Cortot's and Perahia's recordings of the Etudes, and generally prefer Rubinstein's mannerisms over most Chopinzees. But Ashkenazy's "take" on the Nocturnes has a stillness and "coolth" all their own and the sound is very much to my liking.

    I had a little job in the late eighties compiling a new-age package of piano adagios, will full access to Decca's catalog, including Telefunken's. I kicked off my LP/CD/Cassette collection with Ashkenazy's recording of the B-flat minor Nocturne, Op. 9, #1.

    Rubinstein's recording has its own—decidedly old word—charms. And Moravec is to Chopin's Nocturnes as Walter Gieseking is to "Clair de Lune." But I think Ashkenazy's recording of the Nocturnes is one of the best.
     
  16. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Bercuese.

    Then the Nocturne No. 20 in c# minor.

    Then the Etudes.
     
  17. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Your enjoyment is all the thanks I need. :)
     
  18. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Yes, they are very good indeed. Though I prefer Arrau above all others and Tipo (OOP) or maybe Ciccolini (also OOP) second. Probably. It's a tight race though, with Moravec, Wasowski, Pires all turning in excellent perfromances. I also like Rubinstein's first set, mastered by Ward Marston and paired with the 2 Concerti with none other than Barbirolli.

    The Moravec is now out on a Nonesuch 2CD set.
     
  19. zen

    zen Forum Resident

    A couple weeks ago I finished the video-lectures of Beethoven's String Quartets with Professor Robert Greenberg. Very enjoyable. If you love Beethoven's quartets I recommend the Greenberg lectures. Very insightful about Beethoven's history at the time of writing these quartets, the music score is looked at in depth and the professor is quite funny at times. Anyway, the quartet samples were from the Alexander String Quartet's box set on Foghorn (below) and they were simply great. I've been really enjoying this set. The sound quality is excellent. I read that it was, but you know how that goes. It also has an old world charm vibe about it.
     

    Attached Files:

  20. OE3

    OE3 Forum Resident

    Alexander String Quartet

    I saw them play Beethoven in Beverly Hills in January. Excellent. I bought the set, my second after Takacs on Decca.
     
  21. George P

    George P Notable Member

    Location:
    NYC
    I have only one CD of theirs, but it's great!

    I already have the complete stereo Vegh, the complete Julliard and the complete Italiano (plus the Busch and Budapest for historical) so I haven't bought more of the Alexander.
     
  22. Bogey

    Bogey Spy Vinyl User

    Location:
    Colorado
    From this disc:

    [​IMG]

    Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 34: no 1 in A flat major, B 94 "Valse brillante"
    Artur Rubinstein
    Date of Recording: 03/09/1928
    Venue: Studio C, Small Queen's Hall, London

    Waltzes (3) for Piano, B 164/Op. 64: no 2 in C sharp minor
    Artur Rubinstein
    Date of Recording: 12/17/1930
    Venue: Studio C, Small Queen's Hall, London

    Mazurkas (4) for Piano, B 115/Op. 33: no 2 in D major by Frédéric Chopin
    Artur Rubinstein
    Date of Recording: 07/22/1932
    Venue: Studio no 3, Abbey Road, London, England

    Mazurkas (3) for Piano, B 153/Op. 56: no 2 in C major
    Artur Rubinstein
    Date of Recording: 07/22/1932
    Venue: Studio no 3, Abbey Road, London, England

    Mazurkas (3) for Piano, B 162/Op. 63: no 1 in B major
    Artur Rubinstein
    Date of Recording: 07/22/1932
    Venue: Studio no 3, Abbey Road, London, England
     
  23. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    Working my way through this today. One of my favorite all around Tchaik sets. Sound not that great but terrific playing. Perfect tempos too.


    610Y3DKHJYL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
     
  24. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    Can't go wrong with these.
     
  25. fredhammersmith

    fredhammersmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    Despite having more than 6 hours of Chopin music, the Ashkenazy boxset does not include the Nocturne No 20!
    I'll try the Barenboim for this one.
     
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