Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. RiRiIII

    RiRiIII Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Acc. to Diapason of January 2019, the best recordings of Schumann's Manfred overture are:

    1. Furtwaengler - BPO - 1949 - DG
    2. Bernstein - NYPO - 1958 - Sony
    3. Giulini - PO - 1958 - EMI/Warner
    4. Sinopoli - VPO - 1983 - DG
     
  2. RiRiIII

    RiRiIII Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    and the best recordings of Mahler's 9th symphony (Diapason, 12/2018):

    1. Bernstein - RCO - 1985 - DG
    2. Karajan - BPO - 1982 - DG (live)
    3. Abbado - LFO - 2010 - DVD/BD Accentus
    4. Giulini - LAPO - 1976 - DG
     
  3. RiRiIII

    RiRiIII Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    and Schubert's Symphony no 8 (9) - The Great (Diapason, 6/2018):

    1. Muti - BPO - 2009 - DVD EuroArts
    2. Sawallisch - SD - 1966 - Philips
    3. Bernstein - RCO - 1987 - DG
    4. Harnoncourt - VPO - 2009 - DVD/BD
     
  4. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    No Frederick Stock? No Furtwangler? Toscanini? Walter? Indeed, nothing at all from the pre-stereo era? Hmmm.........
     
  5. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    And no Kubelik? :shake:
     
  6. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Cool, I have the Karajan 82 Live DG.
     
  7. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    I've been enjoying this new 7CD box set from Marston records. What a shame that this great pianist is so greatly underappreciated. Hopefully this set will gain him some more recognition. The recordings were made from 1941-1974, so the sound is more modern than one usually finds from this label.
     
  8. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    I've also been enjoying the recordings of the 2nd and 3rd symphonies from the above box. Nice sound and performance!
     
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  9. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Insane indeed. A wonderful set! (Though I do prefer the earlier performances of 1-13 on the Chandos set.)
     
    Marzz likes this.
  10. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Blazing intensity nails it. I love that set.
     
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  11. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Recently decided to take another trip through Sibelius's symphonies, this time with Ashkenazy as my guide. I've always loved his way with these works. His set was my first Sibelius set. My second was Bernstein on SONY, followed by Blomstedt on Decca.
     
    J.A.W. and Eigenvector like this.
  12. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Hi, George, speaking of little-remembered pianists, are you familiar with (Henri) Gil-Marchex? (On the record labels, he goes just by "Gil Marchex," a la Solomon Cuttner going by just "Solomon.") Some years ago a 78 RPM record more or less fell into my lap of this gentleman playing Golliwog's Cakewalk on one side and Le Bavolet Flottant ("The Flowing Ribbon") by Couperin on the other. Now, as you'll recall, when it comes to the French harpsichordists, I generally don't like their music on piano--their work is much less transportable from its intended instrument than, say, Bach's, at least to my ear. Gil-Marchex, however, pulled off the neat accomplishment of making Couperin not just work but be actually enjoyable on piano, and ever since I've been on the lookout for more of his records. Apparently he must not have made many, or at least they didn't sell very well; only today, all these years later, did I manage to add a second to my collection, courtesy of Larry Holdridge's annual auction of 78s, and that was the first I'd seen since the one I already had. How's this for an odd coupling? On one side, a rather delicate minuet in G by Rameau. On the other--Bartok's "Allegro Barbaro"! And he does both of them up proud, I must say. Too bad he's not better known, and I'll confess I would like to know him better than I do; four 10" 78 RPM sides is pretty slim acquaintance, I'm afraid, even if the repertory is pretty varied.
     
  13. Arby Fatbuckle

    Arby Fatbuckle Active Member

    Location:
    Oregon
    Munch, BSO, RCA Victor. My favourite stereo recording.
     
  14. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Hi David, No, I have not heard of Gil-Marchex. There's so many pianists out there to hear. Since I only hear them via CD, I tend to get exposed to less of them than 78 collectors like yourself. I do have a cool/interesting recording to share, though. Awhile back, Marston did a superb box set called A Century of Romantic Chopin, featuring many great, often rare performances by a multitude of pianists, among them Solomon. Anyway, at the end of the set they have historic recordings, some as old as 1895 by Paul Pabst. Among these recordings is a lovely, romantic performance of Chopin's Op. 27/1 Nocturne, played by none other than Bela Bartok!
     
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  15. Livewire91

    Livewire91 Elected Member

    Location:
    Finland
  16. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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  17. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident

    Location:
    new york, ny
    On shuffle in Spotify. :cool:
     
  18. George P

    George P Smellin' Like A Rose Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    A lovely set, as is their set of Haydn trios.
     
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  19. ubertrout

    ubertrout Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Shuffle must be really confusing given that these are multi-movement works.
     
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  20. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Not when I'm moving about or engaged in other activities other than sitting down and appreciating the logic of their progression. Mozart's approach is a far less strict adherence to form anyway so a movement that comes out of left field is, well... expected. And none of these pieces veer very far away from each other in any case.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2019 at 7:10 PM
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