Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. Åke Bergvall

    Åke Bergvall Forum Resident

    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    Remembering that I also have a handful Oistrakh recordings in my Korean Legendary Soviet Recordings box, I discovered yet another early Prokofiev Violin Concerto no. 1, but unfortunately not with the composer this time either, but another Kondrashin (live) recording from 1955 with the All Union Radio Large Symphony Orchestra.
     
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  2. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    That is a drawback to those sets. They give the impression that they are comprehensive, but they are limited in only recordings made for that particular label. Also, they sometimes completely ignore earlier recordings by a given performer, preferring to issue only later recordings, often in stereo sound. At any rate, this appears to be the aforementioned recording. Here's the discogs link: Kabalevsky* / Prokofieff* / David Oistrakh* - Violin Concerto Opus 48 / Violin Concerto #1 In D Major Opus 19

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    It wouldn't be in those boxes; it wasn't recorded by DG or EMI, or in fact any Western label. It would have originated with Melodyia, and if you're trying to track it down you'll need to look for issues sourced from that rich but mysterious catalogue. Good luck--Melodyia recordings seem to wash up on Western shores and then recede again like the tide, and seldom is there any rhyme or reason to what gets issued and what doesn't. There used to be a CD label called Russian Revelation that seems a plausible candidate; you might start there, although I have no idea if it actually ever picked up that recording. Here in the United States, if you were willing to take it in LP form, the Colosseum issue is a known quantity, and the recording might well have appeared on MK; I doubt the former would have made it to Sweden, however, and while I think the latter had more of an "official" relationship with Melodyia, I don't know how much or whether it extended to issues overseas.
     
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  4. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Yes, that's the very one. Thanks for doing some legwork, and agreed about the box collections, particularly their propensity to prioritize sound quality over performance.
     
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  5. Donny Brook

    Donny Brook Forum Resident

    The EMI box also includes the really first-rate 1958 recording of the Concerto No. 2 which was conducted by Alceo Galliera and the Philharmonia Orchestra.
     
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  6. Donny Brook

    Donny Brook Forum Resident

    "Another reported recording with Prokofiev and the Moscow Philharmonic was of the First Violin Concerto with David Oistrakh as soloist; Everest Records later released this recording on an LP. Despite the attribution, the conductor was Aleksandr Gauk. " - Sergei Prokofiev - Wikipedia (item found under "Recordings" heading.

    Prokofiev and Stravinsky – Composers Conduct - "Prokofiev, although he was a reluctant conductor who learned the art only to perform his own works, eventually became quite an adept leader of orchestras. It’s a pity that we have only one recording of his conducting, but it’s a significant one: the Second Suite from Romeo and Juliet. This recording was reissued several times on LPs, with most of these transfers taken from dubbed 78s which were incomplete."
     
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  7. Åke Bergvall

    Åke Bergvall Forum Resident

    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    Thanks drh for the heads-up, but since I'm not a vinyl man (I sold my vinyls back in the late '80's already and have not looked back) I'll have to do without it unless someone transfers it onto CD or a download. By the way, the DG box does include recordings originating with Melodyia via Westminster (including the 1953 Kondrashin recording I mention in my previous post), and I think there are a few early Soviet ones in the EMI box as well that probably have that origin.

    Thanks also to Donny Brook for your links, which seem to rule out Prokofiev conducting this particular recording anyways.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  8. Walter H

    Walter H Santa's Helper

    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    About the suite from Romeo: there are two recordings conducted by the composer. The one on Philips CD, which had been issued a few years before on a Melodiya LP, is different from the one issued on Russian 78s. For details see Peter Adamson's article in Hillandale News:

    Sorry, forum software is not allowing me to post the link. https ://
    archive.org/details/HillandaleNews187 (remove the spaces)
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  9. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    archive.org/details/HillandaleNews187
     
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  10. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying a spin of the first and fourth symphonies from the above set, mine is the original Philips issue.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  11. Bubbamike

    Bubbamike Forum Resident

    I've been enjoying this lately. The Seattle Symphony has come a long way and this recording is rich in orchestral timbres.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. JuniorMaineGuide

    JuniorMaineGuide Forum Resident

    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    Love the Seattle Symphony. I think they are doing amazing work and performing interesting repertoire. They won two Grammies tonight -- for Kernis's Violin Concerto with James Ehnes.
     
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  13. vanhooserd

    vanhooserd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville,TN
    The Nashville Symphony Orchestra is playing his Symphony No. 4 in concerts the 21-23. The performances will be recorded for a Naxos release. The NSO has earned 24 Grammy nominations & won 13 Grammy awards.
     
  14. Donny Brook

    Donny Brook Forum Resident

    This recording was a revelation - my thanks for bringing it to our attention - :tiphat: - I added links to the recording as it really deserves to be heard by a wider audience - the Seattle Symphony Chorale is much stronger than I would have anticipated. I have to admit that my knowledge of them was only in relation to an article in the New York Times about a Henri Dutilleux/ Maurice Ravel performance and the following day's "Sonic Evolution" project which featured Sir-Mix-A-Lot -

    Dutilleux and Ravel Mingle With Sir Mix-a-Lot

    There's actually a video of Sir Mix-A-Lot's performance of "Baby's Got Back" with the Seattle Symphony but I suspect that it may be considered as less than appropriate for this thread and so it shall remain without a direct link although it's rather a hoot and you can't help but laugh but decorum bests humour in such matters as these.

    Back to the Berlioz: Requiem, Op. 5, H. 75 & La mort d'Orphée, H. 25 (Live) -



    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": II. Dies iræ. Prose - Tuba mirum (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": III. Quid sum miser (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": IV. Rex tremendæ (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": V. Quærens me (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": VI. Lacrimosa (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": VII. Offertoire. Chœur des âmes du purgatoire...

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": VIII. Hostias (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": IX. Sanctus (Live)

    Grande messe des morts, Op. 5, H. 75 "Requiem": X. Agnus Dei (Live)

    La mort d'Orphée, H. 25
     
  15. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Just listened to a powerful recording of the second symphony from the above set.
     
  16. Scooterpiety

    Scooterpiety Current operator of the Freedonia peanut stand

    Location:
    Oregon
    As a lifelong fan of Galli-Curci (I have every one of her recordings on original 78s), I have often wondered why the 5 year gap between the two records. I need to check the recording ledgers, perhaps there were earlier attempts which were rejected.
     
  17. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    People like to argue about how she stacks up against such celebrated predecessors as Tetrazzini, but I think no one ever managed to project sheer joy in singing as well as Galli-Curci, at least before that unfortunate throat operation. I don't think she can exactly be described as "under-rated," but I do think she sometimes doesn't quite get her due, either.
     
  18. Scooterpiety

    Scooterpiety Current operator of the Freedonia peanut stand

    Location:
    Oregon
    I agree. Some modern listeners dismiss her as something of a "lightweight", I could not disagree more!
     
  19. Walter H

    Walter H Santa's Helper

    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    So this turns out to be an interesting bit of discography.

    Amelita Galli-Curci (vocalist : soprano vocal) - Discography of American Historical Recordings

    The first part of the Mad Scene is on matrix C-18587, the C of course representing a 12-inch side. On 10/30/1916 takes 1 and 2 are recorded, the next day takes 3 and 4, and on 11/7/1916 take 5. All these are unreleased. On 2/1/1917 we have the released take 6, along with unreleased takes 7 through 9. The second part of the Mad Scene is not attempted.

    Now for the electrical remake, per Victor's standard operating procedure the same matrix number is used, but it's now CVE-18587, the VE denoting the Western Electric system. Take numbers start where the acoustical ones left off, with takes 10 through 12 on 5/6/1926 and take 13 on 12/20/1926 recorded but not issued.

    The second part is attempted on 7/11/1922 (takes 1-3) and the following day (takes 4 and 5), on 12-inch masters C-26595, all unreleased. They try again on 9/20/1922, this time on 10-inch masters, using the same matrix number but with the 10-inch prefix, i.e. B-26595. But this time they start fresh with take numbers 1-4, and 5-6 the next day, take 6 being the one chosen for release. For the electrical remake we're back to 12-inch, and thus CVE-26595, but the take numbers continue from the old 12-inch version. Takes 6 through 8 are recorded 5/7/1926 but not released.

    This is why discographers are making a mistake when they drop those prefixes!
     
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  20. Scooterpiety

    Scooterpiety Current operator of the Freedonia peanut stand

    Location:
    Oregon
    I never understood why Victor used the same matrix numbers for re-recordings of the same selections. I can understand doing it if the recordings are made weeks or possibly even a few months later, but years later? And the same number for both acoustic and electrical recordings? Sometimes (but not always) Victor also recycled catalog numbers for different recordings of the same selection.
     
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  21. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I didn't realize either practice was more than an occasional fluke. Recycling catalogue numbers seems to have been business as usual for Pathe, however, at least if you credit what I remember of the preface to Girard & Barnes.
     
  22. Victor Martell

    Victor Martell Forum Resident

    Well - this is... hmm.. a music forum attached to an audiophile site - seems to me that in general, audiophiles are not keen on historical releases - yes, kind of a generalization and there may be exceptions - obviously drh and probably others do - but just look at music reviews on audiophile publications - nothing pre-stereo...

    v
     
  23. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Ah, but the lists were not from this site--they were from the French music magazine Diapason. As to audiophile publications ignoring pre-stereo recordings--well... not always. See, for instance, Classical Reissue Reviews Archives – Audiophile Audition
     
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  24. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Luckily, the contributors to this thread do not ignore the many, many great historical recordings of classical music. I know that a lot of my own favorite performances for certain works are historical recordings.
     
  25. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Note to George: I don't know/don't remember if you are an admirer of Lubka Kolessa, but the reviews I linked in my immediately preceding post include a 1936 radio performance by that pianist in the Mozart D Minor Cto., appearing for the first time courtesy of Pristine Audio. Must confess, the Doremi issue from some years back devoted to Kolessa didn't do a lot for me, but this one is part of an issue of material led by one of my "automatic want list" conductors, Max Fiedler, so I'm "automatically" interested. Do I remember correctly that you've had less than flattering things to say about Pristine's transfer philosophy in the past? I don't think I have any issues from that label in my collection at the moment. If I recall correctly, the Doremi (which, in fairness, included a different Mozart concerto also conducted by Fiedler) was toward the better end of that wildly inconsistent label's audio production.

    Edit; Perhaps of promise in the case of Pristine: the Fiedler set containing the Kolessa performance was remastered by Mark Obert-Thorn.
     

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