Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Yes, I have sampled them many times and the work of Andrew Rose, who did the transfers I have heard, always sounds too processed and unnatural to me. I am not a fan of Doremi either and though it isn't saying much, their stuff at least seems less tampered with than Pristine.

    I have yet to hear a Mark Obert-Thorn transfer that I didn't like, though some of his have been bettered by Ward Marston. As long as Pristine didn't alter his work, I would think they would be well worth checking out.
     
    crispi likes this.
  2. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Now enjoying CD 01.
     
    cdgenarian and crispi like this.
  3. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Thanks, George! I'll probably jump on the Fiedler in due course, and assuming I do I'll report back how the transfers sound.
     
    George P likes this.
  4. Scooterpiety

    Scooterpiety Current operator of the Freedonia peanut stand

    Location:
    Oregon
    Toscanini looked at the score in later years and said something to the effect that he could not believe he wasted his time memorizing and conducting the work.
     
  5. Edwin Hawley

    Edwin Hawley Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    I recently got this 80s Japanese Melodiya CD of Rachmaninov's Vespers conducted by Sveshnikov. Apparently it is very hard to find. The version available on Amazon is pirated. Great performance!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    cdgenarian and crispi like this.
  6. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Cool!

    I have a recording of the same work with the same conductor and soloists, same label, from 1965.
     
  7. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    And now enjoying CD 02.
     
    cdgenarian likes this.
  8. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    I suspect you are very right. I think when music and arts appreciation ceased being commonly taught in school, this did more than any single thing to cause this to be the case in the USA. A special ed school music teacher did a lot to help me appreciate fine music from young. Also, I got to attend a lot of music and arts programs when things were less regimented. This and my lifelong interest in good sound reproduction and music helped point the way to where I am today. I am fortunate to have been from this generation, do everything I can to cultivate future generations forward.
     
    cdgenarian and Bubbamike like this.
  9. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    [:rant:]

    Schools may not be helping much, but we should not let parents of the more recent generations off the hook. Years ago now I purchased a small collection of 78 RPM classical records from a private seller who had inherited them from her parents. She said that they had known nothing about classical music but were determined their children would be exposed to it and learn about it. I think that attitude was not uncommon among their generation.

    By contrast, the analogous attitude that I often see today, including right here on the forums, is not that parents today are worried about ensuring their kids hear classical music, but that the kids grow up with a proper appreciation of the Beatles and The Rolling Stones and the rest of "classic rock." Classical music isn't even on the radar screen.

    Even if their budgets hadn't generally been slashed to the bone; even if they remained focused on Western classical music (not something that was true as long ago as the 1960s, at least in my elementary school, where mostly we sang dopey made-up songs from a bland "music" textbook); and even if they found an effective method to awaken enthusiasm for what, to most kids, is generally a strange foreign language, something most never managed even when they did have money and focus, music-in-the-schools programs could do only so much. If kids are to develop a love of classical music, usually it will be because their parents see to it that classical music is heard and valued at home. I don't think those conditions hold very often today. In a culture that ensures kids are bombarded on all sides by pop music everywhere they go, in every television show they watch (including those holding themselves out as "educational"), while classical music is heard only with positive effort from parent and child alike, is it any wonder classical music is not exactly a strong presence in their musical awareness?

    [/:rant:]
     
    Wes H, Marzz and cdgenarian like this.
  10. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
    The high school where I was previously an English teacher has a fantastic music program.
    1) Full symphony orchestra
    2) Chamber orchestra
    3) Baroque orchestra (period instruments)
    4) Symphonic band
    5) Jazz band
    6) Madrigal choir (Sang for the Pope once!)
    7) Treble choir
    8) Jazz choir

    Of course, they also have academic courses: AP Theory, Music Essentials, and probably some I've forgotten. So, classical music and music in general is alive and well in Davis, CA!
     
    unclefred, ToddBD and cdgenarian like this.
  11. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Gave this another listen last night. It's a bit up and down, with more ups.
     
    cdgenarian and Bubbamike like this.
  12. Donny Brook

    Donny Brook Forum Resident

    cdgenarian likes this.
  13. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying this lovely recording, which was recommended in this very thread by @Rose River Bear :wave:
     
  14. unclefred

    unclefred Coastie with the Moastie

    Location:
    Oregon Coast
    I remember what awakened me to the great classics was going to the movies. Back then , before the curtain opened, great symphonic music would play for several minutes. Our two theaters were beautiful sounding halls that made the music blossom. It was moving. Today what do the kids have at the movies? Television commercials and Rap blaring away at them.
     
    Wes H, HenryFly and cdgenarian like this.
  15. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
    If his last name looks somewhat familiar, that's because he is Tatiana Nikolayeva's grandson. I'd say he inherited her considerable gifts! He plays several short works by Rachmaninoff, Medtner, Scriabin and Prokofiev. Excellent sound.

    [​IMG]
     
    cdgenarian likes this.
  16. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I don't listen to this 2 CD set of early Rostropovich recordings often enough.
     
    cdgenarian and Eigenvector like this.
  17. Edwin Hawley

    Edwin Hawley Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    That's really great. Would love to be a kid attending a school like that.
     
    cdgenarian likes this.
  18. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying the superb performance of Schubert's 8th symphony from the above set.
     
    cdgenarian and Bubbamike like this.
  19. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Funny thing--I just heard for the first time a recording of Godowsky's "Passacaglia," which is based on the opening bars of the Schubert 8th. (Godowsky wrote it as a tribute pursuant to observances of the 100th anniversary of Schubert's death.) The story goes that Godowsky himself played it easily, but Horowitz spent a year working on it and finally gave up, stating "you'd need six hands to play that thing."
     
    cdgenarian likes this.
  20. George P

    George P Sing Your Life Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Ah, Godowsky. I have read that he played wonderfully in his home for visitors, but his artistry was never really captured on CD. I have the three volume set on Marston Records.

    I recall a quote of a statement to this effect from Josef Hofmann to Abram Chasins (or course, Popsy is Godowsky):

    “Never forget what you heard tonight; never lose the memory of that sound. There is nothing like it in the world. It is tragic that the world has never heard Popsy as only he can play.”
     
    cdgenarian likes this.
  21. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I've moved on to the Godowsky studies on Chopin's op. 10 etudes. I'm playing the recording in small groups, not from one end to the other, which would be just too much in a sitting. Some of them are quite witty, some frightening in their profusions of notes. Sometimes the bass sonorities are astonishing and fabulous. I hadn't realized that Godowsky wrote more than one study per Chopin etude, but it turns out that for most he wrote at least a couple; he wrote seven for op. 10 no. 5. In all or nearly all these sets, at least one is for left hand alone. David Stanhope, the pianist in my CD set, characterizes them as being like variations, and I think that's quite a useful way to think of them. Great fun so far, much more than I had expected; for one thing, for all the studies' overwhelming technical demands, they have much more the feel of serious "recompositions" than "virtuoso showpieces mauling simpler originals" like, say, most of the Liszt paraphrases (or at least the ones I've heard).

    Incidentally, Stanhope has recorded the op. 10 no. 5 set twice, once in the late 1990s on an Australian Stuart & Sons piano and again in the complete set, recorded in 2012, this time on a Steinway. Interesting the contrast between the tonal quality of the two instruments. The Steinway, on the whole, offers a "richer" sound, whereas the Stuart & Sons is brighter, lighter and airier, albeit by no means lacking in heft or power when needed. Stuart & Sons, by the by, has produced the world's first 108 key piano, spanning a full 9 octaves, although that instrument made its appearance well after Stanhope's recordings of the Chopin-Godowsky op. 10-5 studies. It also features four pedals, adding to the typical three a pedal like the "soft" pedal of an upright, which moves the hammers closer to the strings for a quieter but still full-bodied sound. Unlike, say, Bosendorfer, which adds keys in the bass only for its Imperial concert grand, Stuart & Sons extends the "standard" keyboard at both ends. An interesting discussion of how various mfrs. have addressed this issue, with helpful graphics, can be found here: WHY 108 Keys....
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
    Marzz, cdgenarian and Wes H like this.
  22. HenryFly

    HenryFly Forum Resident

    Location:
    Germany
    [​IMG]

    The third movement in particular is really immensely great. I live in one of the cities (Stuttgart) Kleiber made his home for a few years under W. Schäfer's directorship. He was undervalued then as now by the audience here. Almost impossible to fathom that they didn't understand who they had.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2019
    Marzz, Wes H, crispi and 4 others like this.
  23. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    I have enjoyed the LP version of that for many years...

    [​IMG]
     
    cdgenarian and crispi like this.
  24. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    A landmark version of the 5th.

    Regarding his being undervalued... it's not the first time an extraordinary man has been without honor only in his own land.
     
  25. HenryFly

    HenryFly Forum Resident

    Location:
    Germany
    His seven years in Stuttgart as Kapellmeister (Württembergischer Staatsorchester) brought continuity in the reknown of the live opera played in the city. He joined in the same year that Stuttgart's star tenor Fritz Wunderlich died from a horrible accident and the opera company at least had to come to terms with that. He may have lacked sensitivity to how the vaccuum was best to be filled amoung the singers.
    He certainly clashed constantly with stage directors and dramaturgs during rehearsals, but surely there was no earthly reason why he should have left in 1973 with such a hatred of the place.
    He refused all attempts to bring him back as a guest conductor.
    As far as live recordings of Kleiber in Stuttgart from 1966-73 go I have seen ultra rare CD compilations from the Schäfer era in our local public music library with one or two isolated arias. Can't find them to buy so far.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
    Wes H and crispi like this.

Share This Page