Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. Jazzicalit

    Jazzicalit In the Tradition

    Location:
    Italy
    JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH - Concertos
    Hilary Hahn
    Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra / Jeffrey Kahane
    (DGG 2003)

    [​IMG]

    :love:
     
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  2. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Haven't been sleeping well lately, so I am now trying to unwind by listening to the two gorgeous slow movements in the above 2 CD set. I don't normally like to split it works like this, but I really just need to chill right now.
     
  3. bruce2

    bruce2 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Connecticut, USA
    I just ordered a copy.
     
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  4. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    I think you will really like that LP/CD. One of my fave Rachmaninoff CDs.
     
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  5. bruce2

    bruce2 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Connecticut, USA
    Thanks. I don't own any Rachmaninov solo piano music.
     
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  6. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Starting the day with the first two Dvorak string quartets. They are better than I recalled. I plan to listen through this set in the coming weeks.
     
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  7. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    The composer recorded a bit of it--not nearly as much as he should have, but some. Victor issued a group of electrical recordings as 10" album M 722, and in addition there were some single record issues on various labels. His first records were on Edison diamond discs and include the "Polka de W.R." and, inevitably, what Rachmaninoff called "It" (the Prelude in c-Sharp, op. 3 no. 2; he referred to the piece that way because he couldn't go anywhere without being importuned to "play 'it.'")

    Not his own music, exactly, but then also his own music, in a way: he recorded Liszt's 2d Hungarian Rhapsody for Edison and interpolated his own wild (and wildly incompatible, from a standpoint of style) cadenza as the bulk of the third side. Fabulous listening, which everyone should hear at least once.

    I'm sure at least all the electrical material must have been reissued, but I can't help you with specifics, as all my copies are original 78 RPM (or, in the case of the Edisons, 80 RPM) issues.
     
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  8. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    :edthumbs:
     
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  9. Åke Bergvall

    Åke Bergvall Forum Resident

    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
  10. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    George, I sincerely hope those two Chopin slow movements helped you unwind. I particularly love the Larghetto from Chopin's 2nd Piano Concerto... one of the most lovely slow movements of any Romantic era concerto. For a composer who didn't particularly do well with orchestrations, he found amazing inspiration here. The entrance of the bassoon to take over the melody is so haunting -- just brilliant.

    As an aside, I might add that this movement was strikingly used as the theme music for a BBC mini-series, "Notorious Woman: The Story of George Sand," opening and closing each episode. It aired in the U.S. in 1975 on PBS (part of "Masterpiece Theater"). An excellent series featuring Rosemary Harris (George Sand), George Chakiris (Frederic Chopin), and Jeremy Irons (Franz Liszt). Sadly, it has never appeared on home video.
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. JuniorMaineGuide

    JuniorMaineGuide Forum Resident

    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    I was able to pick up the Richter: Live at Carnegie Hall 1960 box for cheap, so I am diving into it now. One thing I like about a good piano recital is that I listen to things I wouldn't have otherwise; I'm not big on Russian composers, for example, but I have enjoyed everything from these concerts I have heard so far. Other pieces gain new life for me when heard alone instead of in the larger context of the group they came from, like a Chopin Scherzo, a single Debussy Prelude, or a movement from Ravel's Miroirs.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. lwh1

    lwh1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kent, England
     
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  13. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Enjoy! I skipped that Box, as I have almost all of it in a previous Sony Box.
     
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  14. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Anybody here have the Naxos Historical series issues of Claudio Arrau, with Desire Defauw and the Chicago SO, performing R. Strauss's Burleske and Weber's Konzertstuck? They are Mark Obert-Thorn transfers, and I'm just curious how the sound stacks up against others in the series. I just tried my own transfers, and although they look pristine, the sound coming from my copy of the 78s is *horrible.* My first thought was that the records all sound like recuts, and sure enough I found a discussion elsewhere online indicating they were all dubbed, something Victor supposedly did to a number of Defauw's recordings to make them more "brilliant." Unfortunately, on decent modern equipment it makes them sound fuzzy and washed out. I do not envy MOT the task of making these sonic sow's ears presentable to even historically tolerant/minded modern listners.
     
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  15. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    This review might help, though I don't have the CD, sorry:

    Arrau Schumann 8111265 [JW]: Classical CD Reviews - February 2008 MusicWeb-International
     
  16. drh

    drh Talking Machine

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  17. Marzz

    Marzz Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    I do have those. They're on separate discs. Rather than potentially mislead you with my attempt at describing the sound (plus I don't have my profile filled out yet - min. 100 lashings right there ;)) I can offer you samples from my CDs if you like. Just let me know
    .
    Alternatively, Chandos offers 60 sec. samples ...
    STRAUSS, R.: Burleske / SCHUMANN: Piano Concerto in A minor / Carnaval (Arrau) (1939-46) Classical Naxos
    BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 3 / WEBER: Konzertstuck / Piano Sonata No. 1 (Arrau) (1941-47) Classical Naxos

    Also available on Spotify, although I understand that may not be the case for the US? On Youtube as well.
    Again, I have the CDs if needed.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  18. Marzz

    Marzz Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    Can't say I disagree with that review, especially of the Schumann concerto. But I remember enjoying the other works on that cd however. Hmm, might explain why I (almost) forgot I even had this!:p
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  19. Marzz

    Marzz Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    @drh
    Also fwiw, copied this from the cd booklets ...

    The Weber Konzertstuck was issued on 78s only in a murky, bass-shy dubbing. (This was also the source for the later Camden LP, which credited the “Century Symphony Orchestra” without mentioning the conductor or soloist). I have transferred it from original postwar American shellac pressings, trying to bring out more of the bass in the process. The final work on the CD, the first recording Arrau made in the USA, was taken down in an unreverberant studio and pressed on noisy, recycled wartime shellac. (Mark Obert-Thorn)

    and

    The Strauss Burleske and the Schumann Piano Concerto were transferred from postwar RCA Victor pressings. All four sides of the Strauss, as well as Sides 5 and 8 of the Schumann Concerto (the beginning of the second movement and the end of the third) were only issued in sonically compromised dubbings. British Parlophone shellacs were the source for Schumann’s Carnaval. (
    Mark Obert-Thorn)
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  20. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Thanks! The booklet notes explain a lot, and the excerpts just go to show that Mark Obert-Thorn can work miracles. In the Strauss one, particularly, he's managed somehow to bring the piano forward into balance with the orchestra; in my original pressings, it's noticeably recessed there. That said, close listening to the samples still sometimes reveals traces of the awfulness he was fighting to overcome.
     
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  21. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Robert Silverman has new Beethoven sonata recordings

    Robert Silverman Beethoven Sonatas - Audio High
     
  22. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Thanks, my friend. It did.

    I couldn't agree more.
     
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  23. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying this rare CD by one of my favorite pianists.
     
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  24. drh

    drh Talking Machine

  25. George P

    George P One Of The Few Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Yep. The one that sounds like the mics were in the roof at the back of the hall. :sigh:
     

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