Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. George P

    George P Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    The tiny new archive-mining label Rhine Classics is based in Taiwan. Rhine Classics has unearthed and remastered previously unissued live tapes, often from artists who left virtually no recorded legacy. (To quote their site: " mostly never before released material | 24bit/96kHz | NO denoise | state of the art remastering ") International shipping is included in the price listed, but these sets are unavailable in conventional web stores and until this week didn't have any sound clips available online. Here's the covers of the two Fiorentino sets:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The sources used are Fiorentino's own master tapes. Here are clips for the Taiwan recital and for the Rach solo cycle, which was performed and recorded live as a cycle over a series of concerts in September 1987.
     
    cdgenarian, Eigenvector and Marzz like this.
  2. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Hi, George, thanks for the heads up! Sounds like another label in the mold of Melo Classics, which alas hasn't issued anything new in a while now. I'll have to check these Rhine issues out.
     
    George P likes this.
  3. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    ...and speaking of Melo Classics, that admirable reissue outfit has a Daniel Shafran recital recording in its catalogue, from 1959:

    DANIIL SHAFRAN plays Brahms, Debussy, Schubert, Shostakovich and Granados
    Recital in Karlsruhe 1959

    1-3. Schubert: Arpeggione Sonata in A minor, D. 821 18:05
    I. Allegro moderato 07:19
    II. Adagio 04:06
    III. Allegretto 06:38
    4-7. Brahms: Cello Sonata No. 2 in F major, Op. 99 25:22
    I. Allegro vivace 08:22
    II. Adagio affettuoso 06:28
    III. Allegro passionato 06:22
    IV. Allegro molto 04:09
    8-10. Debussy: Cello Sonata in D minor, L. 135 09:43
    I. Prologue: Lent, sostenuto e molto risoluto 03:57
    II. Sérénade: Modérément animé 02:39
    III. Final: Animé, léger et nerveux 03:06
    11-14. Shostakovich: Cello Sonata in D minor, Op. 40 22:50
    I. Allegro non troppo – Largo 08:19
    II. Allegro 03:05
    III. Largo 07:41
    IV. Allegro 03:44
    15. Granados: Danza Española No.5 in E Minor, Op. 37 03:48
    Recorded · 06 November 1959 · Karlsruhe · Sendesaal · Süddeutscher Rundfunk · Live Recording
    Daniil Shafran · cello
    Walter Bohle · piano
     
  4. George P

    George P Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Was inspired to listen to the Appassionata sonata after it being featured in Fargo, Season three and decided to put this recording on. Not the most volatile of Appassionatas, but still quite enjoyable. Great sound, too.
     
    Marzz, Bubbamike, Wes H and 1 other person like this.
  5. Tom H

    Tom H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    Anyone recognize this set? Sony/CBS Japan, 6-CDs, 00DC 273~8. I'd be interested to hear opinions.

    [​IMG]
     
    crispi likes this.
  6. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    That CBS/Sony set is from the 1980s. I've never heard it, so I can't comment.

    Tracklisting: BEETHOVEN 5
     
  7. George P

    George P Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Good to know!

    One day I will place an order with them.
     
  8. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Forum member @Wes H is your man for this question. He knows more about Glenn Gould and his recordings than anyone I've ever met and always shares his knowledge generously. The only thing I can say personally is that I think Gould's Beethoven is somewhat controversial--not as controversial as his Mozart, perhaps, but at least unconventional.
     
    Tom H and George P like this.
  9. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Since David put me on the spot, I suppose I’d better weigh in… ;)

    There are many Japanese-issued Gould discs and I’m not familiar with the specifics of them—including this one—so I can only give you general comments about Gould’s Beethoven recordings which you can apply to your set (or not) as you see fit.

    Performance-wise, Gould’s Beethoven is not for everybody, as David noted. I think they’re worthwhile as “alternate” interpretations, but certainly not recommended as a first, or only, recording of Beethoven sonatas. As Gould himself commented: "If you want Beethoven Sonatas as they should be played, buy Schnabel. I just like to experiment."

    Sound quality will depend on many factors such as when the original recording was made (Sonatas 30-32 date back to 1956 and are mono) and when they were (re)mastered for your CD. Is the mastering or release date given for the set? Hans has noted that the set is “from the 1980s.” If that is the release date, then such early digital audio mastering is not likely the best. The photo of Gould on the cover of your set was taken by Don Hunstein in June 1980 for a 2-LP album (CBS released October 1980) of Beethoven’s Sonatas Op.2 and Op.28, which Gould recorded in the mid-to-late ‘70s.

    Historically, CBS issued two notably improved remasterings of the entire Glenn Gould catalog. The first was in recognition of the 10th anniversary of Gould’s death in 1992, with their Super Bit Mastering series issued (in the US, at least) as the “Glenn Gould Edition,” identifiable with white cover CDs. The second—and best—remastering was completed in 2015, utilizing the original analogue tapes and converted to DSD.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Byrdsmaniac and Marzz like this.
  10. Tom H

    Tom H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    Thanks Wes! I am indeed a newbie to Beethoven's Sonatas, although I do have the 9-CD set of Kempff's recordings from the mid-60's issued on DG.

    I purchased the 6-CD Gould set at a sidewalk sale for $2.00 out of curiosity. It appears (from the copyright notice) that it was issued in 1980. According to the booklet, the recordings were made at various dates between 1964 and 1979.
     
  11. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    That set may not be the last word for these works, but for $2 you did great! Enjoy the exploration.

    BTW, my quote (from Gould) about Schnabel is not meant to be my endorsement of Schnabel. Some like him, but with dozens of Beethoven sonata recordings out there, he's not near the top of my list. I like Kempff--I have his sets from the '50s and '60s. Other complete sets I like are by Friedrich Gulda and Claudio Arrau.

    As always, YMMV.
     
    Tom H and George P like this.
  12. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    Judging by the Japanese catalogue number, the set is probably from the mid-1980s, which could mean that it pre-emphasis was applied - as was the case with many CBS/Sony CDs at the time. I have and had a few of those discs (not the Gould, though) and the masterings are not bad, at least better (in my opinion, of course) than the Miles Davis CDs CBS/Sony put out in the 1980s that several people on this forum seem to like so much.
     
    Tom H and Wes H like this.
  13. crispi

    crispi Vinyl Archaeologist

    Location:
    Berlin
    To weigh in and add more to what others have already said, yes, these do look like 80s CDs, indeed. However, in contrast with what Columbia was doing stateside, Sony Japan had pretty good mastering at that time. So these might not be half-bad, perhaps excellent. (Although the best mastering might indeed still be the 2015 one, as mentioned.)
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
    Tom H and Wes H like this.
  14. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Listening to Handel: The Dettingen Te Deum. Performed by The Telemann Society Festival Chorus and Orchestra (and soloists) led by Richard Schulze.
    Recorded at St. Paul's Chapel, Columbia University, NYC. A 1962 Nonesuch LP release; I bought it in 1976.

    [​IMG]

    A bit of nostalgia: The triumphant music that opens this work was used as the opening theme for "DeKoven Presents"--a syndicated weekly radio program hosted by a gentleman simply named, DeKoven. It originated from a NY station and circulated to classical music stations around the U.S. for many years; I heard it locally (in VA) throughout the '70s. DeKoven enthusiastically played mainly "Baracoco" music (from the Baroque and Rococo eras) and often just the fast movements of a work. He was a high-energy guy!

    Anybody else remember that radio program? I lost track of it in the '80s... although by then I was distracted by many other things in life.
     
    Marzz, Eigenvector and George P like this.
  15. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Hi, Wes, and apologies for "putting you on the spot"... :hide: But as I expected, you came through with loads of good info. Who else could rattle off the details of the cover photo at the drop of a hat? So I doff mine to you! :tiphat:

    Can't say I'm familiar with a DeKoven radio program, but I can say that the composer Reginald de Koven wrote a very enjoyable opera Robin Hood that once was extremely popular but hasn't had much play in the last half-century at least. "Oh, Promise Me" was the big hit tune, but "The Armorer's Song" and "Brown October Ale" are also pure delights. Otherwise, I'm very surprised to see the Telemann Society/Schulze imprimatur on a Nonesuch LP. Every one of their recordings I've seen up to now has been on Vox.
     
    Wes H likes this.
  16. Bubbamike

    Bubbamike Forum Resident

  17. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Ever heard of the Amphion record label (with the little seahorse in the corner)? They released a lot of Telemann Society recordings and that's where this one first appeared before Nonesuch made a deal to put it on their label.

    IIRC, there was a Telemann Society radio program back in the day, too. (Obviously, I spent way too much time listening to the radio...:hide: )
     
  18. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    That's it! I never knew his first name was Seymour, though. He always insisted it was "just DeKoven."
    Great write-up in that wikipedia article about the radio program.
     
  19. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Now that you mention it, I used to have a Telemann Society recording on Amphion, but it was sourced from Vox masters. Specifically, Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks, performed on period instruments. The players included some quite big names among orchestral musicians, mostly or all from the Boston SO--but they were all modern instrument players, and they got maybe a couple of weeks or so to accommodate themselves to the demands of things like valveless brasses. One of the world's great party records, that one.
     
    Wes H likes this.
  20. vanhooserd

    vanhooserd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville,TN
    Discogs says the original Amphion issue was in 1962. Nonesuch was founded in 1964.
     
    Wes H likes this.
  21. yasujiro

    yasujiro Forum Resident

    Location:
    tokyo
    I’m hectic these days and can’t make longer comment....

    CBS SONY issued most, if not all of GG’s recordings on CD in the early 80’s. This set is one of them.
    Many of them were issued as box sets with 3~4 CDs in fat boy case.
    The mastering of them is uniformly superb. Easily the very best of his CDs. And this is no exception.
    IMO this is essential for any Gould fans or piano enthusiasts.
     
  22. Tom H

    Tom H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    Thank you for sharing your opinion!
     
  23. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    To clarify... You have compared the early '80s CDs to the 2015 remasters and found the former to be better?
     
  24. George P

    George P Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    FWIW, I compared three different masterings of his solo Brahms, including an early mastering and the latest one and preferred this one.

    [​IMG]

    The latest one sounds a bit too cleaned up and less open than the one above.
     
  25. yasujiro

    yasujiro Forum Resident

    Location:
    tokyo
    I compared the early CBS SONY CDs to the US SBM CDs and preferred the CBS SONY.
     

Share This Page