Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    I dusted off my Historic Russian Archive box sets. This morning I am listening to volume 1 of the Alexander Gauk Editions( Brilliant Classics issued 2 volumes). Tchaikovsky, Hamlet, incidental music for soprano, baritone and Orchestra and Fatum, a tone poem for Orchestra. These are 1951 and 1948 recordings respectively. USSR State Radio and TV Symphony Orchestra and Grand Symphony Orchestra.
     
    Wes H and George P like this.
  2. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    David, I can't answer your question about Rebstein (never heard of him), but thinking about études by Saint-Saëns has me recalling the composer's Étude en forme de valse, Op.52, No.6. Although it's not for the left hand alone, it has always struck me as a work that would be devilishly hard to play with two hands!

    Now spinning this performance by Aldo Ciccolini, recorded in Paris, 1970. (From a Seraphim box set of the Saint-Saëns Piano Concertos.)

    [​IMG]

    On the same LP side, also listening to the Septet for Trumpet, Strings and Piano with Jean Laforge on piano.
     
    royzak2000, George P and Daedalus like this.
  3. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying BAT's 1965 set of the Beethoven Piano Trios.
     
    royzak2000, Wes H and Eigenvector like this.
  4. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Switching over to the lovely recordings of Chopin Nocturnes from the above OOP set. I have a number of recordings of the Nocturnes, as they are probably my favorite works by one of my favorite composers. I''m curious which pianists folks enjoy in the Chopin Nocturnes?

    Other Nocturne sets I have:

    Smeterlin
    Ciani
    Moravec
    Weissenberg
    Wasowski
    Tipo
    Rubinstein (x3)
    Francois
    Arrau
    Ashkenase

    Pires and Abbey Simon are on my "to cull" pile.
     
    Wes H and Eigenvector like this.
  5. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    Still going through the Alexander Gauk box. This morning I put on a disc which contains a tremendous performance of Liszt’s Faust Symphony( version without chorus) coupled with Dukas’ , Sorcerer’s Apprentice. The Liszt was recorded in 1952. The Dukas in 1960. Gauk conducts The Grand Symphony Orchestra and the USSR State Radio and TV Symphony Orchestra respectively. Gauk was also a teacher. He taught, among others, Mravinsky, Svetlanov and Maxim Shostakovich.
     
    Wes H likes this.
  6. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    This reminds me that I should revisit the incomplete collection Leopold Godowsky recorded for Columbia early in the electric era. Haven't played it in forever. The collection that I have played most often in recent years (also incomplete, leaving off after the first half) is by Peter Schmalfuss (ZYX CLS 4140); some years back you sampled that one and weren't much taken with it, as I recall.
     
    George P likes this.
  7. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Might be time for a revisit of Peter's set. I should add Godowsky's to my list, as I have it on Marston CDs. And speaking of Marston, they are having a 20% off sale:
    ______________________

    A sale at Marston Records is a very rare event. In our 22-year history, you can probably count the number of sales we have had on one hand, and this is one is huge:

    Preferred Customers receive 30% off 99 titles from our entire catalogue.* (20% off for non-Preferred Customers.)

    The sale takes place from 8 November through 1 December 2019. This is the perfect time to complete your Marston catalogue, buy one of our more substantial sets at tremendous savings, or have a gift in hand for the holidays.

    *Not-So-Fine Print:
    • For your 30% discount, use the code “Pref30
    • Only one coupon code can be used when placing orders online. If you would like the free shipping Preferred Customer benefit in addition to the 30% off, please place your order by phone or email.
    • The sale does NOT include our upcoming release, Lotte Lehmann Vol. 2.
    • The sale does NOT include the items on our Endangered List
    Best regards,
    The folks at Marston
    __________________________
     
  8. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    Some of the Marston sets look very attractive, but unfortunately the price, the overseas shipping rates and the import duty make them practically unaffordable for EU residents.
     
  9. Klavier

    Klavier Forum Resident

    Location:
    NY
    Hello, this seems to be a nice group, and I look forward to sharing my love of classical music. To begin, here is one of my favorite pieces by Brahms, the Sonata No.3. I love Arrau's rich sonorities.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    George, I like a number of the pianists' versions you posted, but I'll just list the two I play most often.

    On LP, I mostly reach for mid-'60s Rubinstein -- specifically this 2-LP box set that I believe RCA issued in 1967.
    I'm sure you are going to tell me that Rubinstein's recording from 30 years earlier is far more interesting ;)... but I still adore this one. He just plays them as written-- straight forward w/o embellishment-- and I hear "Chopin" come through.

    [​IMG]


    If I'm in a part of my house where it is more convenient to play CDs, I reach for the Naxos set by Idil Biret. Fine (to my ears) piano sound and another straight-forward rendition of the Nocturnes.
    I first came to appreciate Ms. Biret's Chopin after hearing her recording of the Mazurkas. Impressed, I then began picking up all of her Chopin recordings.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Continuing with "Nocturnes" in mind... This evening I'm spinning this Telarc CD of Nocturnes by John Field, played by John O'Conor.

    Lovely!

    [​IMG]
     
    George P and Eigenvector like this.
  12. J.A.W.

    J.A.W. Music Addict

    Talking about Chopin, I'm now listening to audio samples of:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Eigenvector likes this.
  13. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    :laugh:

    His early mono is more interesting to me, yes. I dig the rubato in his mono recordings. But this is all subjective, right? The cool thing about Rubinstein is that he has different approaches at different times of his life that appeal to different listeners. And the advantage of your preference is that it sounds a lot better. Great sounding Chopin is hard to beat. Speaking of which, I just got this set and starting listening to it today.

    [​IMG]

    He plays them slowly, savoring every note. In an interview/video posted on facebook, he says that Chopin lived with a great deal of sadness and Paik wanted to bring this out his recordings of the Nocturnes. I think he does just that. Unfortunately, he loses some essential forward momentum in a number of Nocturnes.

    My two favorites are Arrau (in the 50 Greatest recordings mastering) and Ciccolini (pictured above, sadly OOP.) Arrau was my first set of the Nocturnes and I have still not found anyone that I enjoy more. Ciccolini was recommended by a friend. He plays the Nocturnes delicately, with incredible beauty.

    [​IMG]

    Moravec, Tipo and Wasowski are great in this repertoire too. For incomplete sets, Cortot is hard to beat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
    Wes H likes this.
  14. Klavier

    Klavier Forum Resident

    Location:
    NY
    Hearing these Sonatas and Partitas on the cello, or rather, a piccolo cello, certainly shows them in a new light. (I just played the first two Sonatas and the Chaconne from the 2nd Partita.) He plays them very well and the sound quality is excellent.

    [​IMG]
     
    Wes H likes this.
  15. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Hello, and welcome to the thread! If you like the third sonata, let me commend my favorite recording: Earl Wild, on his own Ivory Classics label. When I think of Wild, I usually think of playing that's--well, "wild," ultra-virtuosic and not always as "personal" as I might like. But this one...although he has the chops to burn that you'd expect for the big moments, what really grabs me is the incredible delicacy with which he plays the quieter passages of the slow movement. It's the sort of playing you get only from someone whose technique transcends technique, that is so exalted he can do things that don't sound as if they require it in ways that can't be done without it.



    While we're on the subject of Arrau, I had a sorry disappointment with one of his '40s vintage 78 sets recently; I've written about it here: [TNT-Audio Vintage column] A cautionary tale
     
    Bubbamike, Wes H and George P like this.
  16. Klavier

    Klavier Forum Resident

    Location:
    NY
    Thank you. I recall an enjoyable old reel-to-reel I had of Wild playing Liszt--I'll look into that Brahms.

    In the meantime, I listened to this wonderful recording today as well.
    [​IMG]


    By the way, how many posts do I need to make before they are no longer held up for moderator approval?
     
    Wes H likes this.
  17. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Wonderful album.

    Welcome! :wave:
     
    George P likes this.
  18. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Yes, it's all subjective, but I'm always open to hearing new takes on these beloved works.

    I'm unfamiliar with Kun-Woo Paik, though I understand what he is saying about trying to interpret Chopin's music through what we know of his life. Sometimes a slow, deliberate pacing can be lovely, but I'm not sure I'd want to hear all 21 played that way. Sometimes when a work is played way slower than I expect, I can't enjoy it because I keep thinking, "C'mon, get on with it!"

    After Rubinstein, my next favored LP set of the Nocturnes is Moravec's performance recorded by Connoisseur Society in 1966. I have them in this box set:

    [​IMG]

    I also have Arrau on 2 Philips LPs, but I've not played them in a long time so I can't recall any specifics (good or bad). Since you rate Arrau so highly, I obviously need to pull them out for a long overdue spin!

    Another Chopin performer I like is Polish-born Adam Harasiewicz, who recorded the Nocturnes (around '68, I believe) and a lot more Chopin for Philips. One doesn't hear much about him these days, but I find his Chopin very compelling. YMMV.

    [​IMG]
     
    Eigenvector and J.A.W. like this.
  19. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Thanks for the compliment and welcome!

    Yes, I love Arrau's rich sonorities too! I particularly like them in his Debussy, his Chopin Nocturnes and his Liszt.
     
  20. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I will be curious to hear what you think of the Arrau. As for the Moravec, that looks like a helluva set. I did a complete Chopin Ballade survey a number of years ago and his were second only to Maria Tipo's live recording on Ermitage. I also did a similar survey of Chopin prelude recordings and again he came in second, this time Sokolov getting first place. And I have always enjoyed his Nocturnes. Have you heard his Pathetique sonata by Beethoven? I find that recording to be the best of his that I have heard. I am lucky enough own them all.
     
    Wes H likes this.
  21. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    I recall the reviews of the sound quality on that Naxos CD scaring me away from that. It didn't take much, for I am not a big fan of orchestral historical recordings.
     
  22. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
    Didn't know I had this, the lack of cover meant it got lost.
    [​IMG]
     
  23. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Nice find! Part is great! I have a number of his CDs, but I never remember to listen to them. I can't listen right now, but I have added this to my "to listen to" pile:

    [​IMG]
     
    royzak2000 likes this.
  24. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
  25. George P

    George P Everybody's Lost Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    As much as I love the composer, the works and the pianist, I have yet to hear that set. I went a little crazy a number of years back, collecting many different recordings of the concertos and stopped short of this set.

    I was thinking yesterday about how I go through phases with some works, collecting many different recordings, only to later discover that I am happy with just a few. I guess that's just the process sometimes.
     

Share This Page