Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Just finished playing music of Gabriel Fauré, played by French pianist Jean-Philippe Collard... for the 5th night in a row! Again, a fabulous performance and recording.
    Tonight it was the 13 Barcarolles. Recorded in the Salle Wagram, Paris, 1974, and first issued on the French Pathé Marconi EMI label.
    This is a 1975 U.S. release by the Connoisseur Society.

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  2. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    I have the box set with Collard. His Faure is great IMO.
    I don't think there is a recording of his that I don't like....especially the French composers.
     
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  3. George P

    George P Gonna Wait It Out Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    You should start your own label. I'd be regular customer!

    (My 40,000th post)
     
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  4. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    This evening I'm listening another Jean-Philippe Collard recording, but this time it is the incredible Rachmaninoff Etudes Tableaux.
    Originally recorded by Pathé Marconi EMI in 1972. This U.S. release on a Connoisseur Society LP is dated 1975.

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  5. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Congratulations on the milestone, George!
    Very impressive. :righton:

    When did this CMC thread originally begin?
     
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  6. George P

    George P Gonna Wait It Out Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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  7. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    :cheers: :edthumbs: :tiphat:
     
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  8. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    WOW. Congrats on that milestone!
     
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  9. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    A question to Sibelius fans including @Mirror Image ......I don't have the Berglund/Bournemouth cycle. I have about four others including the Berglund/Helsinki cycle. Do I really need another? I have been reading the Bournemouth is the best there is. Any thoughts?

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  10. George P

    George P Gonna Wait It Out Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Sorry, can't help firsthand, but . . .

    This thread might help: Sibelius Symphonies
     
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  11. Mirror Image

    Mirror Image Aaron Copland (1900 - 1990)

    I prefer the Berglund Bournemouth recordings because of their rawness and fieriness. I think Berglund later on viewed the composer a bit differently in trying to smooth him out but that edge that he had earlier on is gone in the Helsinki and Chamber Orchestra of Europe cycles. But at the end of the day, let your ears be the judge. I bought the Tower Records released hybrid SACD of the Berglund/Bournemouth last year and have enjoyed the improved sonics. I also ended up buying the companion disc with Ida Haendel/Berglund/Bournemouth in the Violin Concerto (also on hybrid SACD).
     
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  12. Mirror Image

    Mirror Image Aaron Copland (1900 - 1990)

    Dvořák
    In Nature's Realm, Op. 91
    Carnival, Op. 92
    Othello, Op. 93

    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
    Václav Neumann


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  13. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    On this gray, rainy afternoon I am enjoying this album of Brahms and Stravinsky, performed by Misha Dichter--a pianist whose name one rarely hears about today.

    RCA Red Seal LP / US press / 1968.

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  14. Klavier

    Klavier PIANO: PLAY IT LIKE YOU MEAN IT!

    Location:
    US
    One of the greats. His recording of the 2nd Sonata (original version) is superb. Have you heard his new recording of Granados' "Goyescas"? It's excellent, too.
     
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  15. Klavier

    Klavier PIANO: PLAY IT LIKE YOU MEAN IT!

    Location:
    US
    I posted this in the "other" forum--hope it's OK to repeat it here. I think it's going to be my favorite overall.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    I've not heard that, but I don't doubt his performance is superb. In fact, I've never heard a recording by Collard that wasn't impressive.
     
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  17. George P

    George P Gonna Wait It Out Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Maybe one day we'll get a nice big box of his recordings, like we have for other great pianists. (And maybe they won't screw up the mastering. :shh:)
     
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  18. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Indeed! I have LPs by him on both RCA and Philips, so I don't know who would put that together.
    As for the mastering, well, we can only hope. ;)
     
  19. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    Congratulations, George! Perusing the first thread I see a lot of poster names and their recommendations that I enjoyed.
    I started posting late in Thread #1 of the Classical Music Corner. Of the regulars then, I see that drh, George, and myself (dale 88) are still going strong.
     
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  20. George P

    George P Gonna Wait It Out Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Thanks Dale! And thanks for your participation over the years! :wave:
     
  21. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    This thread has been a regular source of pleasure and education, and I never cease to be grateful to George for starting it and nurturing it along. As for me, well, I've been spending a lot of "shut-in" time playing and sorting out hundreds of 78 RPM dupes from a massive collection that I took on--11 years ago! I've never had the time to go through them until now, so I'm making hay while the horse refuses to drink, or whatever the saying is.

    In the process, I made a lovely discovery Friday: "The Brook," a song by one Ellen Dickson, a highly successful 19th century English composer of ballads and salon songs who wrote under the pen name "Dolores," setting a poem by Tennyson. Popular concert soprano and recording stalwart Alma Gluck (wife of violinist Efrem Zimbalist and mother of actor Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.) waxed it for Victor in 1913, and when I first played it time just came to a screeching halt. My immediate reaction was to ask, rhetorically, "Why is this song forgotten? Any recital program would be brightened by its presence." A friend has posted the record to YouTube; be aware that we're in the midst of a (friendly!) debate over what is correct pitch for this record. I think my friend transferred it at 75 RPM, a common speed for Victor records of that day, at which it plays in E Major. Score pitch, at least in the two copies I was able to find online, is D Major, meaning E would be transposing a whole step up. Playing the record at 72 RPM puts it a half step up in E-Flat, which to my ear sounds more "right" and seems a more plausible transposition--but 72 would be a really strange speed for a Victor record of the period. (I should add that getting it to score pitch would mean dropping it to 68 RPM, a *really* weird speed, and when I tried it poor Alma ended up sounding more like a chesty mezzo than her soprano self. So I think that speed, at least, can safely be ruled out.)

    Now you know what I've been doing instead of writing posts here! :whistle:

    An update to something I wrote earlier: the Brunswick Reinberger/Handel organ concerto set arrived in today's mail. First off, I misspoke before; I meant to say that given the recording date I would expect it to be an early electrical, but I inadvertently indicated late acoustical. Moral: proofread! Anyhow, the records, as I had feared, are in pretty rough shape. One side in particular looks as if somebody spread a bunch of sand on a table top and then rubbed the record across it. I'll need to clean them before I do anything else in hopes some of the unattractiveness is dirt--but I'm much afraid it's wear. You never know with 78s until you play them, as sometimes what looks like a wreck can play like a dream and vice-versa, but let's just say I'm keeping my hopes firmly in check. :sigh:
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2020
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  22. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    Starting off today with some light piano fare... Schubert Waltzes. Performed by Paolo Bordoni.
    My photo might look like a single album, but it's a 3-record box set. There are well over 100 waltzes here... (!) Who knew Schubert composed so many?
    Recorded at Abbey Road Studios, London, in November 4-5, 1976; March 8-9, 1978; and May 15-16, 1978.

    [​IMG]

    I believe this is my only recording by this artist.
    Some detail from the back of the box:

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  23. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I got curious to see where and, with trepidation, how I started. Just missed making the first page--my first post is the first on page 2--but I'm relieved to see some things haven't changed: in response to a question about favorite accounts of Schubert's "Great C Major" sym., I wrote pretty much the same thing I would write today: Toscanini/NBCSO and Frederick Stock/CSO. Alas, one other thing that hasn't changed: the latter apparently still has not achieved a transfer to make it available to those who don't dabble in 78s.
     
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  24. George P

    George P Gonna Wait It Out Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    :thumbsup:

    This morning listened to some more Faure with Collard and company. Great stuff!

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  25. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    On the turntable this afternoon: Brahms Piano Quartet in G Minor, Op.25, which was first performed in Hamburg on November 16, 1861, with none other than Clara Schumann at the piano.
    This budget Turnabout LP (with fanciful cover art) from 1966 features a fine performance by members of the Hungarian String Quartet. Georges Szolchàny, Piano.

    [​IMG]
     
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