Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Within classical genre, I first have box sets by period, starting with Baroque, then by composer within each period.
    Then a non-historical performer section organized by instrument, for multi-composer boxes.
    Then a historical performer section, organized by earliest recordings first.
    Then a vocal/opera section.
    Then all my classical composer CDs, organized by period, starting with Baroque.
     
    TonyACT likes this.
  2. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident


    One of the highlights from today's couple of boxes of the collection I just picked up, here we have HMV DB4640/41, Brahms second violin sonata played by Emil Telmányi, violin; Georg Vásárhelyi, piano.
    Quite a rare one this! and in mint condition. I thought long and hard about removing the clicks but it did irritating things to the violin so left it as is. I may later upload a restored version. I adore this sort of stuff and should upload more of it than I do, at least the rarities.
    If any of you fancy having a go and want the 24bit flac files just ask!
    This came from an amazing collection, one original owner who owned an EMG handmade gramophone and only played his records with fibre needles, one of what I'd call the original record collectors. Most of his records are in like new condition and to be able to say that about something from the 1930s does amaze me.
     
    drh, George P and TonyACT like this.
  3. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC


    Watching this great talk/presentation by the great Seth Winner.
     
    drh likes this.
  4. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Quite a lovely performance, leaning more to the "lyrical" than my own first choice, Sitkovetsky/Davidovich on Novalis. (A rare instance in which I prefer a modern performance of Romantic literature to those recorded in pre-LP days). The records do sound to be in good shape, without too much of the usual HMV crackle. Wasn't Telmanyi the gentleman who later on recorded with the so-called "Bach bow"? Congrats on what, if this is an example, must be an uncommonly nice collection!
     
    TonyACT likes this.
  5. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    That promises to be interesting; I'll need to come back to it when I have a couple of hours to invest. Too late tonight.... :yawn:
     
    George P likes this.
  6. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident


    Today's uncommon classical set. HMV C3547/8. Not a mint copy but not bad either, probably E but there are loud passages, particularly at the end of the first side, that distort a little. A shame but I doubt there are many copies that don't have this. A very enjoyable sonata from a composer I knew little about. This isn't as rare as the Telmanyi playing Brahms that I posted yesterday but I haven't had it before. If you do have this set please say if yours doesn't distort!
    Caviat here is the great Pristine have issued this on cd, but I wanted to upload my crackly copy just because, well, I enjoy it.
    Rubbra: violin sonata no. 2 (Albert Sammons&Gerald Moore) (HMV, 1946)
     
    TonyACT likes this.
  7. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident

    Yes, that's him, and I've still not heard those Bach bow records and would very much like to hear them!

    I just posted another item from this collection. It really is wonderful to see so many nice, rare and interesting chamber music sets in one go. I have also just found all 7 discs of Beethoven's third by Furtwangler in 1947 as a manual set in mint condition.
     
  8. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying more great Seth Winner transfers of Fischer's Mozart.
     
    TonyACT and JuniorMaineGuide like this.
  9. JuniorMaineGuide

    JuniorMaineGuide Forum Resident

    Location:
    Boulder, Colorado
    I've been listening to Richard Goode's performances of Mozart's concertos with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra recently. Nos. 9 & 25 today:

    [​IMG]
     
    Adam9, dale 88, TonyACT and 1 other person like this.
  10. cws

    cws Forum Resident

    Location:
    Winter Springs, FL
    By composer with bigger box sets separate from the main collection. I even have some box sets in my bedroom closet. WB Beethoven is currently perched atop its Ravelian cousin. To be honest, it's a mess right now. I'm looking forward to financially more felicitous times (i.e., not grad school!) to build some custom shelving.
     
    TonyACT likes this.
  11. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying the Rach 3 from this CD. It is the third of the pianist's 4 studio recordings of the work.
     
    TonyACT likes this.
  12. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Really enjoying this set of Nocturnes tonight. Weissenberg's direct, no-nonsense approach makes for a nice contrast with my other sets of Nocturnes.
     
    crispi, Adam9, dale 88 and 2 others like this.
  13. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident

    [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG] [​IMG] Here are scans of the album and notes to the 1929 set of Franck's violin sonata in A Major, played by Thibaud and Cortot. This album and it's contents are in astonishing condition! I just thought someone would like to see these. I can get my ocr software to write out the text if it would be of interest. I'm totally blind so I'm pleased to be able to read these, thanks to mum for the photos as I'm totally blind.
     
    crispi, fdsfd, dale 88 and 2 others like this.
  14. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Last night I listened to this set, which I don't think I had heard since I bought it a few years back. It is OOP, but can be heard on Spotify. A student of Godowsky, he shares his teachers fondness for speed in these works. Personally, I usually like them played a good deal slower, as Arrau and Wasowski do, but Smeterlin's way has a great deal going for it. He takes a number of liberties with the score and this, combined with his notably faster than average tempos result in very unique readings. Overall, it makes for a set that I will surely hold onto, even if it isn't one that I will likely put on and listen straight through, like I do with my favorites. Jed Distler, who is no fan of Weissenberg's Nocturnes, which I am enjoying more and more with each listen, really loves this set: Chopin: Nocturnes/Smeterlin - Classics Today

    Speaking of Nocturnes, I found a great comprehensive survey of many of the complete sets. It's a pdf, so I can't link to it, but if you Google "Chopin Nocturnes - Piano Enthusiast" it will be the first result.
     
    TonyACT likes this.
  15. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Today I had a chance to compare the latest mastering of Ivan Moravec's classic set of the Chopin Nocturnes to the one I have had for years, the Nonesuch release. The Nonesuch was mastered by the original producer, E. Alan Silver. As I have said, I have owned and enjoyed this Nonesuch set for years. The sound is a bit dark, which makes for a nice subdued piano and a mood that is often ethereal, mysterious. On the other hand, the Supraphon is brighter, clearer.

    I compared a number of tracks, listened to a few from each, and in the end I have to say I prefer the Nonesuch. It may be because that is the way I got to know these works, or because on my stereo darker masterings tend to sound better than brighter ones, I can't say for sure. I can say that for me the piano sounds fuller, more like Moravec's piano on his other recordings (I own them all.)

    Of course the performances are excellent. Moravec's piano tone is gorgeous, he plays these works with an incredibly wide dynamic range and with great depth of feeling. His playing doesn't wow you right away, it doesn't call attention to itself. Instead, it slowly pulls you in until you don't want him to let go. These are the Nocturnes to play at 3am. I compared some individual works to those by Pires and Smeterlin and both paled next to Moravec. Still, Moravec is not my favorite, that spot is held by Arrau, but his are close behind.
     
  16. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Continuing on my Nocturne binge, I ordered this last night from amazon and it arrived today, with a broken, slim 2CD case. I sampled each track and find the sound to be lacking warmth. The playing is solid, but not special. Luckily, amazon makes returns easy.
     
    TonyACT and Eigenvector like this.
  17. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    That's the one the author of that survey you linked liked so much, isn't it? I'll confess, when he made a big production of dumping on Moiseiwitsch because of "outdated sound," I started finding him a little suspect. ;)
     
    George P likes this.
  18. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    I think E. Alan Silver had a "good ear". His legacy on Connoisseur Society recordings is considerable.
     
    George P likes this.
  19. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    Listening to the favorite version of one of my favorite operas.[​IMG]
     
    Adam9 likes this.
  20. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Original? Or Rimsky revision?
     
  21. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Yeah, it was the one the author gushed over. I have had mixed results with Barenboim, so I figured I'd give it a try. I missed that Moiseiwitsch diss, sounds like the reviewer is, sadly, limiting his options.

    :agree:
     
  22. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    The Rimsky-Korsakov version. I also have the Gergiev Kirov set which contains the 1869 and 1872 versions.
     
  23. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Here's what he said:

    "Before I even begin discussing the subtleties of interpretation, I want to make clear one of my overriding views regarding these works, and whether you agree or not, you will have to keep this a priori precondition in mind. That is, I firmly believe that the piano tone and quality of the piano reproduction in your listening environment is integral to the overall experience, or more so, than whichever tiny details of rubato, or pedaling, or technical fluency you wish to discuss. Chopin would be beyond amusement to consider that there are fanatic collectors who listen to scratchy old Moissewitch [sic] recording fifty or sixty times to divine every last detail of the rubato. They certainly aren’t listening for the tonal qualities, as that is impossible to determine. The two earlier versions of Rubinstein’s recordings of the Nocturnes bare [sic] absolutely no resemblance to the tone I heard in concert and which he was famous for. Sensitive artists strive to create a beautiful tone, with many subtleties of dynamics and pedal nuance. Therefore, I have no tolerance for antiquated recordings which do not give an accurate sense of the pianist’s tone color. Although interesting from a studying point of view, I’d never put on one of those old recordings when I want to just sit back in bask in the beauty of these creations. And that is their purpose."

    As one who loves those "scratchy old recordings," I knew right then that the author and I were not going to see eye to eye. As it happens, I think older recordings, sometimes even acoustic ones, can convey a very nice sense of piano tone--if the playback is done correctly, without excessive filtering and so on. But that's an issue of playback/remastering, not of the old records themselves.
     
    George P likes this.
  24. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    The recent DG 120 Anniversary box set contains old recordings from the very beginnings of the label’s recording history and continuing up through the end of the 78 era as a part of each music section in the box. These recordings have been a special treat and a revelation due to quality of the performances. It was my chance to discover many artists of whom I knew little or nothing. My surprise in these discoveries was akin to discovering and collecting the oldest recordings of the Bolshoi.
     
    crispi, TonyACT and George P like this.
  25. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident

    Predictably I entirely agree with this as a 78 collector, but my wife who loves piano music doesn't understand how I put up with them!
     

Share This Page