Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
    Handel: Chandos Anthems. Vol 1, Nos. 1,2,&3
    Lynne Dawson
    Ian Partridge
    Michael George
    The Sixteen
    Harry Christophers, conductor
    Chandos, 1988.
    Well done.
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  2. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Now enjoying a first listen to this CD, by one of my favorite pianists. Sound isn't that great, but the piano playing sure is.
     
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  3. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Continuing on my Chopin Nocturne obsession, I picked up this 2CD set used this week. I owned it when it came out, but after a number of listenings, I just couldn't connect with the performances. So I gave it to a friend. Then, this week, years later, I saw it for $6 used and couldn't resist. I am listening to it now and I must say, I am enjoying it. Freire's way with these works is very much intimate, a Nocturne for the living room, not the concert hall. This is something I appreciate, as I feel that is how these works should be played. The recorded sound is lovely and Freire's tone is consistently gorgeous. However, his tempos are often faster than I'd like, and he plays these works straight, without a lot of sniffing of the flowers. I think these were the things I didn't like when I heard them the first time, but now, as a third or fourth choice (I can't have enough Nocturnes) his set now has a place in my collection.
     
  4. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    First listen to this CD. Many wonderful moments here and the recorded sound is great, if a bit top-heavy.
     
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  5. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I played half the Cyprien Katsaris Beethoven set today (the first three of six CDs). It embodies an interesting concept--tracing Beethoven's development from his first work for piano to his last--and contains some off-the-beaten-track repertory, to say the least, such as chamber and orchestral works in piano transcriptions by Beethoven himself, Saint-Saens, Liszt, and Wagner, to name a few. I'll need to finish out the set and then revisit everything when I can pay more attention (I was at work, on headphones), but my initial impression was, to me, surprising: I expected something flashy along the lines of "virtuosity for its own sake," but in fact much of what I heard struck me as rather bland, with moderate tempos and fluent but not especially demonstrative playing. I'm happy to have it for the oddities, but so far I don't think anything there would threaten to dethrone any of my current favorites in the works I do know.


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  6. TonyACT

    TonyACT Boxed-in!

    The 7 CD Postnikova / Tchaikovsky box finally arrived after an extended stopover in the Sydney parcel sorting centre. The box is quite drab but the CD sleeves are quite nice:

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    I've started with one of the better-known pieces, which is coupled with a lesser-known student sonata, posthumously numbered Op 80.

    My first experience of either; nice playing and sound, and quite entertaining - I think I'm going to enjoy this box.
     
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  7. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    Hearing Postnikova live was a treat!
     
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  8. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    Listening now:[​IMG]
     
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  9. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I've been, in a desultory sort of way, dabbling in the corresponding Michael Ponti set on LPs. Having played both the sonatas, I'd say the op. 37 (which Tchaikowsky did intend for public consumption, unlike the earlier-written but later-published "op. 80" ) is the better piece, but I don't think such sonata masters as Beethoven and Schubert need fear for their laurels. Of the three recordings I have of the op. 37 (the others are by Shura Cherkassky from a 1982 San Francisco recital, issued on Earl Wild's Ivory Classics label, and Peter Schmalfuss on an obscure label called Bella Musica, both CDs), I like Ponti's best in the first movement, as he really captures the "risoluto" marking, although Cherkassky not surprisingly shows more imagination and better piano tone. Unfortunately, "imagination" can do only so much in this music, which to my ear is mostly about drive and determination. If only Cherkassky had taken it a smidgen faster! In the rest, as I'm finding to be true in most of the works I've played so far, Ponti gives us the notes but not a lot more. I'll add sadly that Schmalfuss, a pianist whose work I've admired elsewhere, gives us neither Ponti's drive nor Cherkassky's imagination; definitely third place in this piece.

    As usual, the budget Murray Hill pressings are no models of the record manufacturer's art. The arrangement shows a complete lack of effort, too. I'm sure these records, sourced from Vox, originally would have conformed to that label's usual practice of appearing in three three-record "Vox Boxes." Murray Hill puts all nine records in a single box but, "for the convenience of the listener" (right), rather than reorganizing them to make sense in that guise presents them as three three-record groups with color-contrasted labels, doubtless each corresponding to a Vox Box, each separately arranged for automatic changers. Clumsy, to say the least. Adding insult to injury, the box takes much more shelf space than it needs to, because for some unaccountable reason Murray Hill fits it with a ca. half-inch cardboard riser in the bottom.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2020
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  10. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Enjoying a first spin of this SACD. The sound is more open, more detailed than my old Eloquence CD (of the pastoral symphony.) However, my old Eloquence has a warmer sound and cost 10% as much as this SACD.
     
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  11. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Going to make my way through the EMI Celibidache Buckner set, starting with the above mass.
     
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  12. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

  13. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Now enjoying this gem.
     
  14. PB Point

    PB Point Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego
    Being brand new to classical music, super happy to go over this thread for the next few years. ;)

    My first intro was being caught by Debussy and La Mer and the Faun. Ravel always seemed to be on side two.

    So regarding Ravel, I dig him too, and have to ask...Is his music what inspired John William’s Star Wars? Even my daughter mentioned it once when she heard me playing Ravel. I had to tell her I thought it was spot on too.

    Had to ask and never zgoogled it either.

    Interested to hear your peoples take. Has this been hashed out for years? Or are we really off?
     
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  15. TonyACT

    TonyACT Boxed-in!

    Welcome aboard.

    First time I've heard the Ravel connection. More common are references to Wagner and Korngold (who was also a composer of significant film scores).
     
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  16. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident

    This record feels like new but sadly distorts a little. Ah well, a rarity in any case! I was over the moon to find this.
     
  17. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Thank you! No one today would dream of playing around with the piece as Busoni does, and if someone did, the critics would promptly launch a ferocious attack. Too bad; the music is a delight as played here.

    That record goes for quite the pretty penny. I have a copy, and back in 2007 I definitely paid far more than I usually do for 78s to get it from a longtime dealer in Oxford, Raymond Glaspole, with whom I've been doing mail order business for years. Unsolicited testimonial: his is definitely a class act, as he is knowledgeable, scrupulous, and gracious. I always enjoy my exchanges with him, and over the years he's helped me make more than one "discovery" among artists and performances.

    Back to the record: I'm away from home at the moment; when I get back, if I remember, I'll dig out my copy and see if it has the same distortion problems. Sometimes, a recording just has technical faults in the original masters. Out of curiosity, what was the playback speed, and which stylus profile did you choose?
     
  18. Robert Godridge

    Robert Godridge Forum Resident

    Raymond is a great guy. I have also bought well from him in the past, though I believe he has just retired or is about to.

    I used a 3.5 mil eliptical in a shure v15 (iii) for this. I tried 2.5 and 4 mil stylie with the same distortion, even a conical 4 mil on a goldring g800 and lastly a good old fibre needle, same deal. I transfered it at 78 dead on with my technics 1210gr which locks in exactly to all 3 speeds. It's very adjustable but it didn't sound off key to me. I have also just posted the other side.
     
  19. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
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    Next up in my Nocturne-frenzy is Maria Tipo. I adore her live Ballades on Ermitage, but I find her Nocturnes less successful. Tempos are very slow and often don't work for her. This set is OOP anyway, though I still think it would be great if EMI did a big box of her recordings on CD.
     
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  20. rischa

    rischa Where'd Dizzy go?

    Location:
    Madison, WI
    My first post on CM Corner!

    Anyone else love these quirky old Nonesuch albums? Most sound pretty good and I love the off-the-beaten-path performances and musicians.

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  21. TonyACT

    TonyACT Boxed-in!

    Nice pic. I haven't come across these before, but they certainly look colorful and an interesting range of repertoire.
     
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  22. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Welcome to the Corner! :wave:
     
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  23. rischa

    rischa Where'd Dizzy go?

    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Thanks! Yes, the fun cover art is definitely part of the appeal. Classical by way of Yellow Submarine.
     
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  24. rischa

    rischa Where'd Dizzy go?

    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Thanks! Looks like a fun place to kill some time on a Saturday night!
     
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  25. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Speaking of nighttime and Nonesuch, this is a favorite of mine:

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