Click repair question

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by earlburtnett, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. earlburtnett

    earlburtnett Active Member Thread Starter

    hi say you have a record where the ending has a little too much noise than the beginning of the record how do you clean the record at the end of the record?thanks

    lenny
     
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  2. Apesbrain

    Apesbrain Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Coast, USA
    Is the "noise" you're looking to remove mostly "clicks/crackle" or more of a general "hiss" or "roar"?
     
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  3. earlburtnett

    earlburtnett Active Member Thread Starter

    hi its a general distoration..maybe a little of everything..whats "roar"?when I bring it up in facebook they say its a tracking problem but that's wrong..
     
  4. Apesbrain

    Apesbrain Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Coast, USA
    You might try the "Noise Reduction" effect in Audacity (free). You can treat the entire file or a section of a file. I find that reducing noise on the quiet "head" and "tail" of a track is usually enough to remove the annoyance factor.
     
  5. earlburtnett

    earlburtnett Active Member Thread Starter

    hi I use audacity to put the tunes into the computer and no more..thats why I have click repair..i heard the stuff in audacity is crappo..

    lenny
     
  6. Grower of Mushrooms

    Grower of Mushrooms Omnivorous mammalian bipedal entity.

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Hi Lenny, maybe you could try Apes brain's suggestion above, then you would know whether it'll do what you`re looking for.

    It's sometimes a good idea not to believe everything you hear, especially when people are being dismissive of free products such as Audacity.
     
  7. Apesbrain

    Apesbrain Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Coast, USA
    Be open to the possibility that what you "heard" may not be true. The Noise Reduction functionality of Audacity is perfectly serviceable. You "train" the effect on a blank area between tracks, and then apply it to whatever areas you want. If you feel the character of the noise changes from track to track, you can "re-train" at any point. Like I said, I'd try just de-noising the head/tails of tracks first to see if adequate.

    You might search for "iZotope Music & Speech Cleaner". It's discontinued, but once was a free app offered by this DAW developer that is considered one of the best.

    Otherwise, although ClickRepair is not designed to remove wide-band noise, the same developer sells another product for that. Buy it and let us know how things work out.
     
  8. earlburtnett

    earlburtnett Active Member Thread Starter

    ok
    whats the name of the product he sells?
     
  9. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    Afraid I usually wind up with a swishing sounding artifact that's more distracting than the surface noise itself when I try to use Audacity. Very occasionally I'll get an acceptable result.
     
  10. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    Sounds like inner groove distortion to me.
     
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  11. Leonthepro

    Leonthepro Skeptically Optimistic Autodidact Debater

    Location:
    Uppsala Sweden
    Cant fix that.
     
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  12. Grower of Mushrooms

    Grower of Mushrooms Omnivorous mammalian bipedal entity.

    Location:
    Glasgow
    I think the key is to be as precise as possible in selecting the minimum length of waveform before and after the clicks.

    It's laborious I know, but worth it if you're after pristine needledrops.
     
  13. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    I just ran the low pass filter from Sound Studio and got a better result than I did using the Noise Removal on Audacity. I was treating a 45 from 1960 pressed on noisy styrene.
     
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  14. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    No, but you can try a different cart or needle and try adjusting the VTA. I was having a lot of good looking records sound bad and finally determined that my OM 40 was worn out.
     
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  15. Leonthepro

    Leonthepro Skeptically Optimistic Autodidact Debater

    Location:
    Uppsala Sweden
    How long was it on? Seems like you would be doing a lot of damage if you could hear it audibly playing bad because of the stylus wear.
     
  16. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    Months. Though I doubt any single record got more than one or two plays. I'm guessing it got nicked and was riding too deep in the groove. Weirdly, it was needledrops that really suffered.
     
  17. Leonthepro

    Leonthepro Skeptically Optimistic Autodidact Debater

    Location:
    Uppsala Sweden
    Only months? Do you play 10 records a day ;^)
    Had to have be chipped or something, takes most half a year to reach 200 hours even.
     
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  18. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    When you asked how long it was on, I thought you meant how long has the problem been going on! I honestly have no idea how old this stylus is, since I have two of them, one for each deck. But if it's the old one, it's O-L-D. Or it could be chipped.
     
  19. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    I've got a different Click Repair question. Does anyone else's program have a glitch in it that causes it to default to "sum to mono" when they open it? Not every time, but fairly frequently.
     
  20. Leonthepro

    Leonthepro Skeptically Optimistic Autodidact Debater

    Location:
    Uppsala Sweden
    Maybe its best to keep track of how many sides its been through.
     
    uzn007 likes this.
  21. ConradH

    ConradH Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Canandaigua, NY
    I do pretty much all my processing in Audacity and it's far from crappo. Some types of pops and clicks just don't lend themselves to automatic routines. I expand those and redraw the waveform manually, based on surrounding information. I've used other programs and always come back to Audacity. The signature based noise reduction is excellent if used right. I tend to do things on a track-by-track basis, not the whole LP at once, so differences between the beginning and end don't matter. If you're looking for some fully automated solution, you'll never get as good a result as you could. That said, it usually takes me several hours to fully process an LP to the degree I want.
     
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