Common misconceptions about artists or albums?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by H.S98, May 14, 2022 at 9:52 PM.

  1. H.S98

    H.S98 Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    As an aspiring film critic and writer on cinema and pop culture, I debunk prevalent myths about film or entertainment in general. What are some in regards to music, whether it'd be about bands, artists, or specific albums?

    For example, albums that've been thought of as failures when they were first released when they weren't. I have a few mild examples for this with Metallica's Load, Reload, and St. Anger. Due to the polarizing reactions to the former two albums and the negative impact that St. Anger had on Metallica's career, certain fans think that they were outright failures in terms of critical and fan reception. Load and Reload have been praised by many for their experimental and eclectic styles; several tracks have become fan favorites and concert staples. St. Anger initially received mixed reviews from critics and still averages a score of 65 out of 100 on Metacritic.
     
  2. H.S98

    H.S98 Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
  3. 9 Volt

    9 Volt That cat's something I can't explain

    Location:
    L.A.
    There are so many misconceptions about the Beatles doing things before anyone else did. It’s astonishing. Despite what you may have heard or read the Fab Four were not the first to do any of the following:

    Tape flanging: That prestigious honour goes to mixing engineer Larry Levine on Toni Fisher's 1959 top five hit "The Big Hurt." Many people confuse ADT (automatic double tracking, invented by Abbey Road engineer Ken Townsend) with tape flanging but they are two different processes with different sonic results. To further confuse things tape flanging was incorrectly called 'phasing' by studio personnel and artists back in its infancy. Phasing and flanging are definitely not the same thing.

    Fuzz/distorted instrument on a record: Marty Robbins' bassist Grady Martin got there first quite serendipitously in late 1960 when he plugged into a faulty mixing channel during a recording session. Thank you Grady!

    Backwards guitar on a recording: Pierre Schaeffer circa 1950, can't recall the exact piece.

    Heavy Metal: Oh please. And no it wasn't The Who either. See Tony Iommi. Please!

    A recording which could never be reproduced in a live performance: Halim El Dabh- "Expressions of Zaar" for wire recorder, 1944.

    The concept of Pop Stardom: Rudy Vallee beat Bing Crosby there by several years. Hard for anyone today to imagine just how popular this guy was. The first "crooner."

    The concept of Superstardom: Frank Sinatra beat Elvis by quite a few years. Utterly massive record/concert sales, successful films, his own weekly radio show, an insane amount of publicity and hundreds of thousands of adoring, screaming female fans all over the world, all this made Frank the very first superstar.

    Groupies: Sinatra beats Elvis again. Old Blue Eyes was a chick magnet unlike any singer who preceded him.

    The idea of a popular artist writing his/her own songs: I'm unsure who was truly first but just as an example Johnny Mercer beat the Beatles by over three decades.

    I could go on…
     
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  4. davebush

    davebush New Test Leper

    Location:
    Fonthill, ON
    These are all opinions, not misconceptions.
     
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  5. H.S98

    H.S98 Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    Wrong. There's a difference between disliking these three albums and the held belief by some that they failed critically. It's fact that they weren't failures despite their divisive reputations.
     
  6. H.S98

    H.S98 Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    100% correct. Thank you for this.
     
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  7. soarer29

    soarer29 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rhode Island
    That "only" dogs can hear the high-pitched noise at the end of "A Day In The Life". Some people can, and some people can't (it seems to be age-dependent), but it's not that high-pitched. I absolutely hate how this "fact" gets regurgitated on Buzzfeed lists and such.

    Edit: to be precise, it's 15 KHz, which is well within the hearing range of children and still within the range of many adults.
     
  8. soarer29

    soarer29 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rhode Island
    Since the mid-2010s, there has been a misperception (by people who weren't old enough to remember the late '90s and beginning of the '00s) that Smash Mouth was a one-hit wonder, which they most certainly weren't. They weren't thought of a novelty act, either - just a pop rock band.
     
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  9. classicrockguy

    classicrockguy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Livingston NJ
    One kid in my elementary school used to wear all these Grateful Dead T-shirts with the skulls with snakes coming out of their mouth etc.
    I always thought they would be some kind of death metal band, imagine my surprise when I heard "Uncle John's Band", like this is what they sound like?
     
  10. nosticker

    nosticker Forum Guy

    Location:
    Ringwood, NJ
    Let's get a big one out of the way: the oft-quoted quote from Lennon, which was said by a British comedian, Jasper Carrott, about the drumming prowess of Ringo, within his own band. Actually, it may go back further than Mr. Carrott.


    Dan
     
  11. H.S98

    H.S98 Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    It appears that many articles in the blogosphere and public perception have caused certain acts to retroactively become one-hit wonders, ie. Gerry Rafferty, The Human League.
     
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  12. UnderTheFloorboards'66

    UnderTheFloorboards'66 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    This!
     
  13. soarer29

    soarer29 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rhode Island
    That Stephen Stills wrote “For What It’s Worth” about the Kent State shootings - how could a song from 1966 possibly be about an event in 1970?
     
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  14. bRETT

    bRETT Senior Member

    Location:
    Boston MA
    I thought it was generally understood to be about the Sunset Strip riots.
     
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  15. Kingsley Fats

    Kingsley Fats Forum Resident

    2 songs being mixed up here.
    Ohio is the CSNY song about the Kent State shootings.
    For What It’s Worth is about the riots on Sunset Strip.
     
  16. soarer29

    soarer29 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rhode Island
    You are correct, but my point is that “For What It’s Worth” seems to get confused with “Ohio”, leading to the misconception of it being about the Kent State Shootings.
     
  17. H.S98

    H.S98 Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    There's an urban legend that Metallica's song Ronnie is about a real-life school shooting, but there is no evidence of this. There's speculation that it could be about Ronnie Van Zant, but it's just speculation.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2022 at 12:48 AM
  18. Danby Delight

    Danby Delight Forum Resident

    Location:
    Boston
    By whom, though? I've never heard anyone claim "For What It's Worth" is about Kent State.
     
  19. bRETT

    bRETT Senior Member

    Location:
    Boston MA
    Far as anyone seems to know, Jasper Carrott can take credit or blame for that observation….which was not even made until John Lennon could not possibly have done.

    Me, I think Mr Carrott peaked with “Funky Moped.”
     
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  20. soarer29

    soarer29 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rhode Island
    In a radio interview in 2006, Stills apparently heard many people saying this. I can’t find a link to the original, though.
     
  21. bRETT

    bRETT Senior Member

    Location:
    Boston MA

    Check Art Neville’s “Cha Dooky Doo,” from 1958.
     
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  22. 9 Volt

    9 Volt That cat's something I can't explain

    Location:
    L.A.
    .
    I stand corrected. Thanks bRETT!
     
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  23. Babysquid

    Babysquid Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    we loved “The Detectives” as kids!
     
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  24. Babysquid

    Babysquid Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    Contemporary reviews of Oasis’s What’s The Story were less celebratory than history would have you believe . The opposite with their next LP
     
  25. Nothing can prepare you for the crushing disappointment of hearing the Grateful Dead for the first time.
     
    Alternative4, planckera, Sear and 7 others like this.

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