SH Spotlight Do you want to hear two amazing RCA-Victor 78s from 1932? Ted Weems, Isham Jones..

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Steve Hoffman, Oct 9, 2010.

  1. Vinylsoul 1965

    Vinylsoul 1965 Forum Resident

    And now will someone direct me to a good 78 rig/setup? Links? :)
     
  2. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    KAB 1200 modded to play 78 with a Shure cart or something similar. Or, get a used Dual or similar machine for 60 bucks. It's not rocket science. Play in RIAA and combine channels to mono. Enjoy.
     
  3. Vinylsoul 1965

    Vinylsoul 1965 Forum Resident

    True it is not rocket science, but it is always good to know where to start :)
     
  4. boyfromnowhere

    boyfromnowhere Forum Resident

    Location:
    missouri, usa
    I thought 78s (pre '50s) were meant to be played without the RIAA equalization?
     
  5. AnalogJ

    AnalogJ CMO (Chief Musical Officer)

    Location:
    Salem, MA
    I Passed On BSO/Koussevitzky/Beethoven No. 9 Set

    I don't have a high quality playback setup, only a tabletop RCA tubed unit, so I passed on an 8 disc, 16-sided set of Koussevitzky and the BSO performing Beethoven's 9th. I almost got it because it was on clear red 12" 78s, so they were cool to look at.

    I wish I had the space for another turntable. All of my space is vertical and I don't have much of it.
     
  6. il pleut

    il pleut New Member

    Electrically recorded 78s used many different eq curves depending on who recorded them and when. They basically have similar characteristics to RIAA, (bass boost, treble rolloff), so RIAA works, though it's not optimal. Acoustic recordings (pre 1925 or so) are a different animal altogether.

    It's the same for styli. You can drive yourself crazy trying to find the optimal stylus for each record, which kind of takes away from some of the enjoyment of listening to them, unless you really love wonking around like that.
     
  7. boyfromnowhere

    boyfromnowhere Forum Resident

    Location:
    missouri, usa
    Ah, that makes sense.
     
  8. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Look, just play them on RIAA. Good enough. Why drive yourself bonkers? No two are EQ'd alike, too many variations to list but on RIAA, the noise is lowered and the music for the most part stays intact, very musical and tuneful. If you must, add 2 db at 3k to everything.
     
  9. Love those two bands. :righton:

    Another great one, for me, was/is the Ambrose Orchestra from England.
     
  10. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Those British bands were amazing. And don't get me started on my new favorite old stuff: The hot German dance bands of the Weimar Republic. Drives me bonkers that the stuff is so rare I can't grab any of it..

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odcerDbhNg0
     
  11. That was great!

    formiggini sure does have lots of excellent tracks uploaded and I'm sure you have already checked out HeadHunter131's channel.

    Many of these German 78s may be extremely rare to find and purchase in excellent condition but at least we now have the chance to listen to them.

    And that fact would have been next to impossible just a short while ago before sharing websites like YT came to be.
     
  12. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Yeah, that guy has an amazing collection of 20s-30s German records. Impossible to find here in the States.
     
  13. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    So many great bands like that. Ambrose records (I'm talking about MINT British 78's from back then) are very inexpensive. I've seen them for a buck each here. They look brand new from the 1930s.

    Oh, dig this funky TED WEEMS ORCHESTRA clip. It's from 1930's.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cK5r6EmKJyU&feature=related
     
  14. Any links to old British material please? I wouldn't know what to begin searching for!

    As for the collection in post #1 I'm loving it and have linked it to a friend to blow his mind about the sound only to find out he likes this music too - was very greatful for the links like I am

    :righton:
     
  15. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    I don't have any links to British Dance Band stuff but I'm sure someone here can provide it...


    Fellers?
     
  16. dale 88

    dale 88 Errand Boy for Rhythm

    Location:
    west of sun valley
  17. A cool channel for some early British dance bands.

    A classic from the Savoy Havana Dance Band :laugh:
     
  18. Steve E.

    Steve E. Doc Wurly and Chief Lathe Troll

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    Oh my. I just clicked the link for this "Ev'ryone Says I Love You" and, at first, I thought I must have gone to the wrong page. I couldn't imagine a 1932 recording could sound that good. As in, recorded yesterday.

    Mind boggling. Thanks, Steve!
     
  19. SBurke

    SBurke Nostalgia Junkie

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Unbelievable how good those records sound! Really blew me away. I would have guessed you'd have to get to the early 50's before hearing something like that.

    There are some Stokowski/Philadelphia O recordings from 1934 made at the same church. Now available from Music & Arts on CD. Sound good, but can't hold a candle to those two on posted at the start of this thread. One Vivaldi track on the M&A set says it was "first issued on Victor 14113 and 14114." 78 collectors, would that have been the same "scroll Victor" series?
     
  20. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

    Location:
    .
    That catalog # doesn't ring a bell with me for Victor issues of that time. If it's from 1934, it's still in with the scroll era.

    A scroll is only a label type, anyway, it's not an automatic denominator of great sonics. There were even the (very odd) acoustic era recordings reissued with scroll labels on them, so you never know quite what you get. Though it's safe to presume at least pretty good sound for the time, I think, when you've got a scroll label record.
     
  21. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

    Location:
    .
    Jack Hylton must have had some cache here in the states, because I've been able to find a number of his records, and they're pretty good too.
     
  22. acdc7369

    acdc7369 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    wow, these sound really good. 1932? damn...i never thought anything from back then could sound this good.

    sounds way better than most modern recordings because it hasn't been ruined by the loudness wars. pathetic.
     
  23. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

    Location:
    .
    Gordon Jenkins did some arranging for Isham Jones during his tenure, in the 1930's.
     
  24. subatomic09

    subatomic09 Forum Resident

    Location:
    New Jersey
    I've always been called an "old soul" by friends and family, and this is further proof of that. I'm 29, and this music gives me chills of joy. :)

    Thanks, Steve!
     
  25. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

    Location:
    .
    Perhaps I can be forgiven for derailing the thread slightly, to post what the well heeled music lover of 1928 could come to after a long day in the salt mines.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukJPsU9zEtk

    A minty scroll playing on a Victor Orthophonic phono.

    The way those high notes peal forth, the guy's 'professional' equipment still can't capture it. It's like the microphone capsule is getting mashed or something. Imagine being there in the room (and some of the bass has gone missing on this video capture.)

    And if any of you watch this, please, no old jokes about breaking glass or some such.:)

    It's so visceral, it whacks me one in the chops, even filtered down through these digital channels.
     

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