Dylan / Blonde on Blonde: 'That Thin Wild Mercury Sound' (Daryl Sanders book, Oct. 2018)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by HominyRhodes, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. Percy Song

    Percy Song Tom's Tambourine Man

    Percy's notes ...

    Chapter 4 - continued

    pp56-58

    Recording "Brand New Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat". The ".. jumping-off point.."


     
  2. Percy Song

    Percy Song Tom's Tambourine Man

    ..... and owing a debt to Memphis Minnie, too, perhaps, as did many others...






    Take 1 from 25 January ends up on "The Bootleg Series Vol. 7". Al Kooper is probably playing piano, Paul Griffin is on organ, with Bob on rhythm guitar. Rick Danko on bass, Robbie on lead guitar and Bobby Gregg on drums.

    So far Bob has recorded nothing that will make it onto "Blonde on Blonde". Surely the next one stands a chance. With Al assigned to the organ and the masterful Paul Griffin taking over on piano, the birth of the first child, "One of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later)", is but a mere twenty-four takes away....
     
  3. Rocknut

    Rocknut Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Boston
    I've just started Daryl's book and know it's going to be a great read. It's great to see some ink on the ins and outs of the Nashville Cats.

    The opening section of the book deals with Dylan's farewell to Tom Wilson. I've always wondered why Tom Wilson was dismissed immediately after recording what was up to that point Dylan's most successful single, "Like A Rolling Stone." Wilson's take on Al Kooper's organ part (Hey, man, that cat's not an organ player) may very well have been one of the reasons. I have a theory that Dylan and Grossman also may not have been happy with Wilson's lack of commitment to the project. The sessions for "Like A Rolling Stone" took place on June 15 and 16, 1965. What always amazed me is the fact that Wilson also did the overdub session for Simon and Garfunkel's "The Sound Of Silence" in the evening of June 15. This means that Wilson was not only responsible for the production of two of the most important 45s of the 1960, but that he recorded them on the very same day. I can imagine it must not have sat well with Dylan and his team that Wilson worked on another session in the same studio, using some of the same session guys (Bobby Clegg and Al Gorgoni).

    The four overdubbed Dylan songs recorded on December 8, 1964 were just a quick experiment that Tom Wilson did to find out if Dylan's music could work with electric backing. Dion DiMucci claims that he suggested doing these overdubs to Tom Wilson because he believed Dylan's songs had hit potential if he used a backing band. Daryl's book suggests that "Dylan rejected all four tracks." From what I understand, the overdub session was never intended for release and just an experiment. Dion claimed that Dylan liked what he heard, so much so that he only a month later started recording tracks for what would become Bringing It All Back Home with electric backing. This makes this fairly under-documented session an important moment in the development of folk-rock.

    Krogsgaard claims that "Tom Wilson having already had some success doing a similar job tinkering with Simon & Garfunkel's original acoustic recording of Sound Of Silence" is not accurate. The Dylan overdub session took place six months earlier on December 8th, 1964, while Wilson dressed up "The Sound Of Silence" with electric guitars and drums on June 15, 1965.
     
  4. Dr. Luther's Assistant

    Dr. Luther's Assistant dancing about architecture

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Wow. Fascinating.
    Thank you for the effort.
     
  5. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    Great post, thank you. In another thread five years ago, Don Meehan, one of the Columbia engineers who worked on the Dylan tracks overdubbed by Wilson, actually made an appearance here at the SHF: The Truth About S&G "Sounds Of Silence" -- I wish we could have gotten a little more out of him on the subject.

    For a couple of years now I've been compiling info specifically about Dylan singles for a dedicated thread, and I made the following notes about the Dec. '64 overdub session:

    POSSIBLE DYLAN SINGLE?: HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN
    "House of the Rising Sun" by the Animals became a #1 hit in both the U.K. and U.S. in the summer of 1964; the group's lead singer, Eric Burdon, would later "refute" the notion that they based their "electric" version of the old American folk song on Dylan's earlier recording, and claimed that they first heard the song from a British performer named Johnny Handle; Dylan himself had borrowed the arrangement from his friend, singer Dave Van Ronk, who reportedly wasn't pleased that Bob had recorded it for his first album.

    In December of 1964, several months after the Animals single topped the charts, Columbia producer Tom Wilson assembled session musicians to add overdubs to Dylan's original solo version of "House of the Rising Sun," the same basic arrangement of which had been used by The Animals; Wilson also selected outtake versions of "Rocks and Gravel," "Corrina, Corrina" and "Mixed Up Confusion," all recorded by Dylan with backup musicians in 1962, for additional overdubs.

    Columbia may have planned to release these reworked tracks on singles, or possibly as an E.P. -- a 7" stereo jukebox E.P. would be issued with four tracks from Bringing It All Back Home the following year; ultimately, none of the Dec. '64 O.D. tracks were issued commercially, although "House of the Rising Sun" was later included as a bonus track on the Highway 61 Interactive CD-ROM; acetate copies of several of the overdubbed tracks (along with two takes of That's All Right Mama from the 1962 "band" sessions) first came into circulation among collectors in the early 1980s. [UPDATE: 1962 COPYRIGHT EXTENSION collection -- all undubbed original versions now released? Also: one of the versions of "Rocks and Gravel" surfaced in an episode of True Detective on the HBO cable network]

    In mid-1965, Tom Wilson would add overdubbed backing vocalists onto Dylan's Jan. 1965 studio version of "If You Gotta Go, Go Now" (which was released as a single in 1967, but only in Europe), and the producer would also add backing musicians to Simon & Garfunkel's acoustic version of "The Sound of Silence," a huge hit single for the duo at the end of 1965.


    I think a vinyl E.P. of the four Wilson overdubs would be great for an RSD release -- maybe they could include a bonus 45 with the single version of "If You Gotta Go, Go Now," too. :uhhuh:

    In Robert Shelton's Dylan bio, he recounts an interview conducted while airborne from Lincoln, Nebraska to a concert in Denver in March 1966, where Dylan briefly referenced those O.D'd tracks, and was aware that Columbia was "trying to retouch them."

    [​IMG]

     
  6. Rocknut

    Rocknut Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Boston
    Very interesting. I did not know that any of the overdubbed tracks besides "House Of The Rising Son" ever made it into circulation. Have you heard them?

    Also, when Don Meehan joined the thread did he have any information on who besides Bobby Cregg were part of the December 8 overdub session? I've asked Al Gorgoni a while ago, but he claimed to never have been on a Dylan overdub session. Bobby Cregg and Bruce Langhorne are no longer around to tell us. Who else could have provided the electric jangle on "House Of The Rising Son"? Vinnie Bell? It's possible that Dion DiMucci and Don Meehan are the only ones still alive who were present at the Dec. 8, 1964 session.
     
  7. baconbadge

    baconbadge Chooglin’

    Location:
    Queens, NY
    Would anyone with a copy mind posting a clip of the Sad Eyed Lady "vocal flub" from the Canadian pressing? Would love to hear it.
     
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  8. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    "House Of The Rising Son" from 1961 was the only solo acoustic number to be overdubbed in Dec. of '64, and it may have been the only one to feature Bobby Gregg's drumming and the 'electric jangle' guitar that you mention. The other three titles were originally recorded with Bruce Langhorne and a cast of other studio musicians in 1962 -- it's still not clear to me how extensively they were reworked in '64.

    AFAIK, it hasn't been determined which version of "Corrina, Corrina" was redone by Wilson and the studio musicians during the '64 session, and I don't think that particular O.D.'d track has ever come into circulation.

    Some Columbia 'reference acetates' began surfacing in the 1980s, and among them were several takes/mixes of "Mixed Up Confusion." I'd have to go back and dig those versions out to hear what's what, but I think they included at least two different takes and one or more alternate mixes of the single version of "Confusion." One of them had been used on the vinyl Masterpieces collection in 1978, and it was used again on the early vinyl pressings of Biograph, although it was eventually replaced by the correct single version on the CDs and on Side Tracks.

    According to bjorner.com, this is the version of "Rock and Gravel" overdubbed in Dec. '64:

    Rocks and Gravel - Bob Dylan (True Detective Soundtrack - HBO)


    So that means that two, or possibly three, of the tracks overdubbed by Tom Wilson are now in circulation. If anyone has further info on the subject, I'd love to hear more about it.
     
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  9. NumberEight

    NumberEight Came too late and stayed too long

    You're making me wonder whether the Mixed-Up Confusion/Corrina, Corrina single released in the Netherlands in November 1966 contains the original or the overdubbed versions...
     
  10. Roger Ford

    Roger Ford Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bristol, England
    This is from an ISIS article I contributed to after the 1962 Copyright Collection came out:

    NOTE 9: Since documentary evidence on the various “Mixed Up Confusion” releases has not been available, the following is based on careful
    listening. It seems that this 1 November 1962 recording (CO 76982-10) [i.e Take 10] has been the source for several versions:
    (1) The original recording, with the musicians listed above, has previously been available to collectors in mono from an acetate.
    (2) Using the 3-track master of this take, Dylan’s part (guitar, harmonica and vocal) was separated from its backing tracks and overdubbed with
    new backing at a later date (most likely on 8 December 1964 at the overdub session without Dylan present).
    (3) This overdubbed version was then used in 1974 on the Japanese promotional LP “Mr D’s Collection #1”, in 1978 on the “Masterpieces”
    collection and in 1985, in a stereo mix, on the original release of “Biograph”. In 1997, however, when “Biograph” was remastered , this
    overdubbed version was replaced by a stereo mix of the original single release. Mixed up confusion indeed!

    I think the overdubbed version may have subsequently reappeared on a European edition of Biograph. I should add that before they did the overdub, they slowed down the stripped-down guitar & vocal track so as to lower the pitch by a semitone, maybe to make it an easier key for the musicians to handle. This is why it never sounded right in this overdubbed form.

    The Dutch single was a different take (Take 14), and was the original recording. It was never overdubbed, to my knowledge.

    I'm sorry, we're straying rather a long way from the subject of Daryl's book . . .
     
  11. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    Thank you, Roger.:righton:
     
  12. Electric Sydney

    Electric Sydney Forum Resident

    Location:
    Scarsdale, NY
    Maybe all this great info will be turned into Daryl’s next book!
     
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  13. Rocknut

    Rocknut Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Boston
    This HBO soundtrack version of "Rocks and Gravel" is the same take as track 16 on CD of The 50th Anniversary Collection 1962. The only difference is a bit more low end EQ-ed in and perhaps a wee bit of reverb, but I do not hear any electric instruments. I always understood that Dec. 8, 1964 O.D. session was done to get some electric guitars in there to move Bob's music more in a rock direction. This quite nice band version of "Rocks and Gravel" has acoustic instruments only and has more of snappy skiffle feel. Krogsgaard assumes that the undocumented players are George Barnes (guitar), Bruce Langhorne (guitar), Gene Ramey (bass), Dickwellstood (piano) and Herb Lovelle (drums). I assume that means that the band was recorded on Nov. 1, 1962, not in 1964. Perhaps Tom Wilson on Dec. 8 just did some brushing up instead of adding instruments on the 1962 tracks.
     
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  14. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    Agreed, we'll try to get back on track.

    Another photo from the grand opening party held at Nashville's Columbia Studio 'A' on Oct. 22, 1965, taken from inside the control room; this would have been producer Bob Johnston's perspective during the Dylan sessions the following February and March. (The rectangular bright spot in the photo seems to be a reflection from inside the glass.)
    [​IMG]

    Not the best quality, and I can't recall the original source of this photo, but here's a 1960s shot taken in Studio 'A'; session guitarist Wayne Moss is shown at left; I'm not sure who the other guitarist and the piano(?) player are. Wayne's hollow-body -- is that a Gretsch?[​IMG]
     
  15. Percy Song

    Percy Song Tom's Tambourine Man

    More Percy notes.... still in New York, still in January 1966:-

    pp 58 - 65

    Daryl devotes seven pages to the creation of "One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later)" which becomes Bob's second single of 1966 (over here, anyway - was it the first of 1966 in the US?) and the first song recorded that will be included on "Blonde on Blonde". Al Kooper remembers dropping in after "Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat" on 25 Jan, but it is him on piano on that one. He switches to organ for "One of Us Must Know".

    By Take 18 the group is coming round the final bend and you can tell for sure this great song is not going to suffer the same fate as "She's Your Lover Now". Daryl sets the scene as Bob Johnston goes into the studio after the take (new information for me, thanks @Daryl Sanders !) for a conflab with Bob and the players. Can anyone decipher the discussion taking place just after Take 18? Who is saying "....I'm going to modify it a little bit....", for example?

    Take 24 is the one. But because this is "Blonde on Blonde", on which nothing is straightforward, there is some editing done to the performance before it is released as a mono single. This editing carries through onto all the mono versions of the LP but doesn't feature on the stereo LPs. Mono and stereo - you need them both. You need them all! The full story of the editing of the mono version is told by @Roger Ford over at Electric Dylan, of course. (Or he may wish to copy/paste his findings here.)

    Let's not forget the terrific contribution from Paul Griffin on this song. Hopefully everyone here has access to Big Blue and can play Disc 12, Track 5.

    I'm not sure Bob ever gave a hoot for chart positions, but this one didn't fare too well as a single. By my reckoning it was the worst performing single since he first appeared in the charts in 1965. Would "Freeze Out" have fared any better as a single? Maybe.


    [​IMG]

    There would be one more session in New York before Bob would make the decision that, "It was the band...."

    #
     
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  16. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    Excellent post, @Percy Song -- please hold that thought, and everyone please indulge me as I go backtracking into Dylan's previous singles, and then add a few more thoughts about "One of Us Must Know," before I get back to where I left off upthread, regarding the "Rainy Day Women" single, and its release date.

    To my knowledge, only two Dylan 45s were issued commercially in the U.S. prior to 1965: "Mixed Up Confusion" b/w "Corrina, Corrina," which pretty much sank without a trace in 1962; and "Blowin' In The Wind" b/w "Don't Think Twice," issued in 1963 on the heels of Peter, Paul & Mary's wildly successful hit version of "...Wind."

    In 1964, Johnny Cash recorded Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe" (featuring Charlie McCoy on harmonica, it should be noted) and Columbia made an effort to promote the track, taking out a full-page ad in Billboard to spotlight the single version. The ad linked Cash, the established artist, with Dylan, the up-and-comer, in a significant way.

    The following spring, the half-acoustic, half -'electric' Bringing It All Back Home album was released, and its lead-off track, "Subterranean Homesick Blues," was issued as a single. Billboard listed it on March 20, 1965, giving it four stars, but no rave review. Two weeks later, on the same day the track moved up from 'Bubbling Under' and debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart at #83, it also showed up as a 'Discotheque' selection, credited to Bobby Dylan. Were they trying to turn him into some kind of a teen idol? On April 10th, a Columbia ad in Billboard grouped him with easy-listening pop stars Barbra Streisand and Andy Williams (which seems a little awkward in retrospect), but two weeks later they took out a full-page ad to promote both "Subterranean" and BIABH; the single was a modest hit in the U.S. and would top out at #44 on the Billboard chart, while in the U.K. it made it to #9 in May of '65.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I've always found it interesting that CBS purchased the Fender guitar company in early '65, just as Dylan was "going electric." It definitely would have been in the company's interest to have their recording artists promote the brand, and of course Dylan did his part, later that year:

    [​IMG]
    Why Dylan chose a Fender bass for this Highway 61-era photo shoot is unknown. He was also photographed using a Fender Jaguar electric guitar during some of the '65 recording sessions; he chose a Stratocaster for the infamous Newport show, and as Daryl's book explains (p. 24), Robbie Robertson soon talked BD into using a Telecaster; IIRC, that's what Dylan used on Blonde on Blonde, and throughout the 1966 tours.

    In the U.K., "The Times They Are A-Changin" was released as a single, and reached #7 in April '65, prior to "Subterranean" entering the charts. In June, "Maggie's Farm" b/w "On The Road Again," was also released in the U.K., but didn't perform very well.

    Beginning that summer, and lasting well into 1966 and beyond, cover versions of Bob Dylan songs became all the rage on the radio and singles charts in the U.S and the U.K. A few examples from the second half of 1965:

    "Mr. Tambourine Man" by the Byrds -- #1 U.S. & U.K.
    "All I Really Want to Do" by Cher -- #15 in U.S., #9 in U.K.
    "All I Really Want to Do" by the Byrds -- #9 in U.K.
    "It Ain't Me Babe" by the Turtles -- #8 U.S.
    "If You Gotta Go, Go Now" by Manfred Mann -- #2 U.K. [this record was banned in Ireland in late '65]

    Circumstantial evidence [i.e. the Miami Sales Message, recorded during the British tour in the spring of '65] indicates that Dylan planned to release "If You Gotta Go, Go Now" as the follow-up single to "Subterranean," but changed his mind after writing and recording "Like A Rolling Stone" in mid-June. After that, it was whole new ballgame. LARS soared to #2 in U.S., and reached #4 in the U.K., and it appears that Columbia raised their expectations for him as a popular singles artist from that time on.

    [​IMG]

    Earlier in the thread, we discussed the initial pressings of "Positively 4th Street" that mistakenly contained the slow/'celeste' version of "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?" After they got all that straightened out, the genuine "4th Street" single did very well, reaching #7 on the U.S. charts and #8 in the U.K. Once again, Columbia was undoubtedly thrilled.
    [​IMG]

    It would be another five or six months before any of Dylan's single releases became as successful as "Like A Rolling Stone" and "Positively 4th Street." Across Chapters 3 and 4 in his book, Daryl recounts BD's often-frustrating studio sessions in NYC between October '65 and Jan. '66; Dylan later said that he was being "pressured" to come up with a worthy successor to his two previous hits. At that same time, his original songs, as recorded by himself and by so many others, had catapulted him into stardom, and he took his rightful place as one of the Big Three, along with the Beatles and the Stones. Looking through the Billboard album and singles charts from late '65 and early '66 clearly shows how influential he'd become.

    [taking a break here -- more singles coverage to follow]
     
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  17. John DeAngelis

    John DeAngelis Senior Member

    Location:
    New York, NY
    In exchange for getting free equipment, musicians who endorsed Fender instruments allowed their photos to be used in Fender catalogs and advertisements. I think Dylan posed with the Fender Jazz Bass as a joke--he posed with an instrument he didn't play, knowing that its would go into the catalog, or he chose the photo/photos as the one/ones Fender would use. It's like baseball players who posed for their baseball cards batting left-handed when they were really right-handed.
     
  18. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    Some more info about Dylan singles here, hope I'm not derailing anyone's train of thought...

    At some point, I wouldn't mind having a new discussion about that single, Roger. In one of your Cutting Edge essays, you summarized the controversy surrounding its true recording date (Oct. '65? / Nov. 65?), and you did so in a fair, even-handed manner. The Nov. '65 date is now widely accepted, but I still tend to believe that the released version of "Crawl Out" (the one with 'cowbell') was done in October, and I can always dust off my old defense brief from another Dylan thread we did around here a few years ago, if anyone's the least bit interested in revisiting the topic. (I may regret saying that...:sweating:)

    "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?
    " was released in the U.S. at the end of December '65, and Columbia sprang for a full page ad in Billboard on Christmas Day:
    [​IMG]
    (Again, showing off that Fender bass, hahaha...)

    The U.S. single entered Billboard's Hot 100 chart at number 99 on New Year's Day 1966, so I'm guessing that it had, in fact, been available in stores over the holiday shopping season. Our good friend @Maranatha5585 has shared an image of a U.K. test pressing of the single dated the 14th of January 1966, indicating that it was released several weeks later in the British isles: More .. Signed Photos, LP's, PS's, Promo's, Memorabilia, Empherea, Etc.

    The single struggled its way up the U.S Billboard chart to #58 on Jan. 29, but by early Feb. it had disappeared. In the U.K. it did much better, reaching #17 on the Record Mirror singles chart on "29 January."

    That same month, Dylan had returned to the recording studio and was working on some new songs, one of which would be released as his next single. As @Percy Song noted above, it would ultimately be included on Blonde on Blonde: "One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later)" met with very little commercial success in the U.S. and abroad, and the near-five-minute length of the track, as well its lyrical content, seems to have caused Columbia a bit of worry. It was paired with "Queen Jane Aproximately" (from the Highway 61 album) for retail sales and on white label promo DJ copies, but a second, drastically edited version was also sent to DJs:

    [​IMG]
    (scanned images of both sides of my promo copy of "One Of Us Must Know")

    When "Like A Rolling Stone" was released the previous summer, Columbia had bragged about releasing a six-minute single ("Why Not?") but in 1966 the company began veering towards releasing Dylan singles that more closely conformed to the demands of Top 40 AM radio stations, and several of them would be edited down to try and meet the standard three-minutes-or-less running time that radio programmers preferred. In the case of "One Of Us Must Know," the mono mix of the song was cut from 4:49 down to 3:07 in one of the versions provided to DJs, with the song being unceremoniously faded out just before the final verse. This not only shortened it to a more radio-friendly length, it also eliminated the "clawed out my eyes" line, which probably didn't play very well with older or 'more sensitive' listeners in that era, although it may seem tame by 21st century pop music standards.

    The new single was released on or about Thursday, Feb. 17, 1966 (hope I have that right!) and was listed in both Billboard and Cashbox two days later:

    [​IMG]

    In a full-page Billboard ad on Feb. 26th, Columbia reminded everyone that Dylan wrote "message" songs:

    [​IMG]

    Exactly one month later, March 26, 1966, the single emerged at #119 on Billboard's 'Bubbling Under the Hot 100' chart, but then it vanished. It never entered Record Mirror's top 20 chart in the U.K., so radio airplay and sales must have been rather dismal over there, too.

    [BTW: I've been meaning to mention that I've only been able to access chart information and advertisements from Billboard and Cashbox, and only partial information from issues of Record Mirror, so that's why I'm only including singles released in the U.S. and the U.K.; for further information on the various Dylan singles issued in other parts of the world, the ONLY place to go is ---> "Searching For A Gem" home page ]

    The next Dylan single, recorded in Nashville in March of 1966, would return him to the top (or nearly the top) of the singles charts, and I'll be returning to add a few more sentences about "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" shortly. Thanks to everyone for sticking with me here until I can fully 'unload my head' about all this stuff...o_O
     
  19. HominyRhodes

    HominyRhodes Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Chicago
    My bad -- in addition to the indispensible SearchingForAGem, I should have also mentioned 45cat, another fantastic, detailed source of information about Dylan's singles, from all areas of the world.
     
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  20. Maranatha5585

    Maranatha5585 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Down South
     
  21. Maranatha5585

    Maranatha5585 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Down South
    @HominyRhodes ~ Really enjoying the thread.. great discussion, and points being made. I'm particularly loving the Billboard, and other trade mag ads, a couple which are completely new to me. Very cool .. Thanks! ya know I go crazy over such things. Ahhh... to be in Chicago, and get to see THAT electric guitar, Enjoy my friend!

    Sorry about the previous post above folks, it 'timed out'.
    Never could have repeated it all, nothing earth shattering..
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2018
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  22. Percy Song

    Percy Song Tom's Tambourine Man

    White label promos! Lovely!

    For searchable UK chart information (singles and LPs), this is the official online reference. Click on the "chart facts" icon for the statistics. (The associated thumbnail images are not particularly accurate).

    BOB DYLAN | full Official Chart History | Official Charts Company
     
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  23. Roger Ford

    Roger Ford Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bristol, England
    No problem, I'll be happy to join in that one.:) You've read what I've said about it, here; what are your reasons for thinking it was recorded at the October session?
     
  24. Roger Ford

    Roger Ford Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bristol, England
    Great posts on the singles, Hominy. Funnily enough, I've been working on and off for a few months on a new section of Electric Dylan about the 1965-66 singles. I'd got as far as "I Want You", and then Daryl's book came out, and then the BOTT box set came out... so it's still waiting to be finished off. But you've practically done the job here:targettiphat:! I'm particularly interested to hear about the 45cat site - that's new to me. Could have saved me quite a bit of time :realmad:
     
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  25. oxegen

    oxegen Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    The book “Hypnotist Collectors” is another great source for international picture sleeve singles and EPs.
     
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