Elvis Presley - The Albums and Singles Thread pt2 The Sixties

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by mark winstanley, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. Dave112

    Dave112 Forum Resident

    It does have that same vibe as "Made In Japan" by Buck Owens.
     
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  2. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    yea, i can see that
     
  3. DirkM

    DirkM Forum Resident

    Location:
    MA, USA
    In a peculiar way, Flaming Star and Summer Kisses, Winter Tears exemplify what is so great about Elvis. The songs are thoroughly mediocre: the melodies uninspired, the rhythms joyless, the lyrics rather silly...and yet they're entertaining to listen to simply because of the strength (and inexplicable conviction) of Elvis' voice.

    Black Star is an interesting alternate, but it doesn't scan nearly as well as the finished version (such as it is).
     
  4. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    This is so well said that I wish I would have thought of saying it myself.
     
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  5. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    I Feel So Bad

    [​IMG][​IMG]


    Written By :
    Chuck Willis

    Recorded :

    RCA's Studio B, Nashville, March 12-13, 1961 : March 12, 1961. take 2

    "I Feel So Bad" is a blues song written and originally recorded by Chuck Willis in 1953 (OKeh 7029). It rose to #8 on the Billboard Rhythm & Blues Chart in early 1954, and appears on the album Chuck Willis Wails the Blues.

    A version of the song was recorded by Elvis Presley on March 12, 1961 in RCA Studio B, in Nashville, TN.[1] Presley recorded a version of the song following the arrangements by Willis and his singing style. Presley's version reached No.5 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1961[2] and No.15 on Billboard's Top 20 R&B Singles chart the same year.[3] The song, which was released on a double A-side single in the UK (c/w "Wild in the Country"), reached No.4 on the UK singles chart, also in 1961.
    -------------------------------------
    This is a boogie driven blues, which surprisingly to me reached number five on the charts. It is a pretty straight forward song with a consistent and slightly varying keyboard riff at the end of each phrase. We get a really nice sax solo and a rootsy rock and roll song that the band seem to be having fun playing.


     
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  6. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    Wild In The Country
    Written By :
    Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore & George Weiss

    Recorded :

    Radio Recorders, Hollywood, November 7-8, 1960: November 7, 1960. take 19

    "Wild in the Country" is a song first recorded by Elvis Presley as part of the soundtrack for his 1961 motion picture Wild in the Country.

    It was written by Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore, and George Weiss.[1][2][3][4][5]

    In 1961 the song was released on a single with "I Feel So Bad" on the opposite side. In the United States "Wild in the Country" peaked at number 26 on the Billboard Hot 100, while "I Feel So Bad" peaked at number 5.[6] Also, "Wild in the Country" entered the top 10 in Flamish Belgium (Flanders) and Hong Kong.[7]
    ----------------------------
    Here we have a very gentle country style ballad. Elvis lays down some nice falsetto. This is a very sparse song, with essentially the acoustic guitar and the backing vocals. It works very well. I don't think I am familiar with the movie that this is from.

     
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  7. johnny q

    johnny q Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bergen County, NJ
    This!

    I heard an interview w/ Robert Plant in the early 2000's. He was being interviewed by Suzie Quattro. I am paraphrasing, but here is the general gist. He said he considers "Big Hunk Of Love" one of the greatest rock n roll songs of all times. But he mentioned that in the hands of any other singer, the song would have been substandard and corny. Hence the greatness of Presley. I am by no means comparing this great track to anything from Flaming Star - but I think my point is made.

    JQ
     
  8. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    Indeed it is
     
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  9. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    Once again Elvis and the Nashville A Team of musicians really nail this blues boogie song with an effortlessness that must have made every other singer and studio musician almost green with envy. I love that great piano riff at the end of each line as well.
     
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  10. SKATTERBRANE

    SKATTERBRANE Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    Elvis' acting was the least self conscious and the most natural in the movie Follow That Dream. That was is best display of acting, even better than King Creole.
     
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  11. Neil Anderson

    Neil Anderson Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    I first heard "summer kisses, winter tears" as covered by Julee Cruise for the soundtrack of Until the End of the World. Really liked it. Didn't find out till years later that the original version was by Elvis.
     
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  12. czeskleba

    czeskleba Senior Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    That piano riff is taken directly from the Chuck Willis original. Sometimes Elvis really brought something new to a cover or even bettered the original, but this one is a case where he very closely copied the original version and didn't really add anything. A decent performance but he clearly didn't over-exert himself creatively on this one.
     
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  13. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY (LP)
    (US) RCA LSP / LPM 2370
    Released: May 19, 1961

    [​IMG][​IMG]


    After his military discharge from the army in March 1960, any doubts about Presley's ability to recapture the momentum of his career in the 1950s had been laid to rest. During that year his three singles had all topped the charts, and his first album, Elvis Is Back!, had gone to number 2 on the albums chart. His musical film G.I. Blues had been wildly successful, its soundtrack album also going to number 1.

    Presley entered the familiar Studio B in Nashville on March 12, 1961 and recorded eleven of the tracks for this album in one twelve-hour session, in addition to the single "I Feel So Bad".[5]:148 The single was initially scheduled to be the twelfth track for the album, but Presley chose, after RCA executive Bill Bullock overruled the Colonel who wanted "Wild In The Country" paired with "I Slipped, I Stumbled, I Fell" as the single, it to accompany the title track to the film Wild in the Country as the promotional 45 for the film. Another track that had appeared in the film but not released commercially on records, "I Slipped, I Stumbled, I Fell", became the final track for the album.[5]:156

    The July 13, 1999, compact disc reissue included six bonus tracks, four singles and two b-sides recorded over the span of a year and issued in 1961 and 1962, and altered the album's running order. All of the sides made the Top 40 at a time when Billboard charted B-sides as well, and two of the singles, "Surrender" and "Good Luck Charm", topped the singles chart. "Surrender" had been recorded at the sessions for Presley's gospel album of 1960, His Hand in Mine, and the sides for 47-7908 and 47-7992 at sessions specifically to produce singles. The entirety of the 1999 reissue appeared on the Legacy Edition reissue of Elvis Is Back! released in 2011. Bonus tracks were all recorded at Studio B in Nashville.

    In 2006 Something for Everybody was reissued on the Follow That Dream label as a special 2-disc CD collection containing the original tracks along with numerous alternate takes.[6][7]

    On March 12–13, 1961



    On November 8, 1960

    • Elvis Presley – vocals, acoustic rhythm guitar
    • The Jordanaires – backing vocals
    • Scotty Moore – electric rhythm guitar
    • Tiny Timbrell - lead guitar
    • Dudley Brooks –piano
    • Meyer Rubin – double bass
    • D.J. Fontana – drums
    The Original album
    The Ballad Side
    1."There's Always Me" - Don Robertson - March 12, 1961 - 2:16
    2. "Give Me the Right" - Fred Wise and Norman Blagman - March 12, 1961 - 2:32
    3. "It's a Sin" - Fred Rose and Zeb Turner - March 12, 1961 - 2:39
    4. "Sentimental Me" - James T. Morehead and James Cassin - March 13, 1961 - 2:31
    5. "Starting Today" - Don Robertson - March 13, 1961 - 2:03
    6. "Gently" - Murray Wisell and Edward Lisbona - March 12, 1961 - 2:15

    The Rhythm Side
    1. "I'm Comin' Home" Charlie Rich March 12, 1961 2:20
    2. "In Your Arms" Aaron Schroeder and Wally Gold March 12, 1961 1:50
    3. "Put the Blame On Me" Fred Wise, Kay Twomey, Norman Blagman March 13, 1961 1:57
    4. "Judy" Teddy Redell March 13, 1961 2:10
    5. "I Want You With Me" Woody Harris March 12, 1961 2:13
    6. "I Slipped, I Stumbled, I Fell" Fred Wise and Ben Weisman November 8, 1960 1:35

    The 1999 Reissue
    1. "Surrender" (released February 7, 1961, RCA 47-7850, #1) Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman October 30, 1960 1:51
    2. "There's Always Me" Don Robertson March 12, 1961 2:16
    3. "Give Me the Right" Fred Wise and Norman Blagman March 12, 1961 2:32
    4. Untitled Fred Rose and Zeb Turner March 12, 1961 2:39
    5. "Sentimental Me" James T. Morehead and James Cassin March 13, 1961 2:31
    6. "Starting Today" Don Robertson March 13, 1961 2:03
    7. "Gently" Murray Wisell and Edward Lisbona March 12, 1961 2:15
    8. "I'm Coming Home" Charlie Rich March 12, 1961 2:20
    9. "In Your Arms" Aaron Schroeder and Wally Gold March 12, 1961 1:50
    10. "Put the Blame On Me" Fred Wise, Kay Twomey, Norman Blagman March 13, 1961 1:57
    11. "Judy" Teddy Redell March 13, 1961 2:10
    12. "I Want You With Me" Woody Harris March 12, 1961 2:13
    13. "I Feel So Bad" (May 2, 1961, RCA 47-7880, #5) Chuck Willis March 12, 1961 2:53
    14. "(Marie's the Name) His Latest Flame" (August 8, 1961, RCA 47-7908, #4) Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman June 25, 1961 2:07
    15. "Little Sister" (August 8, 1961, RCA 47-7908b, #5) Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman June 25, 1961 2:30
    16. "Good Luck Charm" (February 27, 1962, RCA 47-7992, #1) Aaron Schroeder and Wally Gold October 15, 1961 2:23
    17. "Anything That's Part of You" (February 27, 1962, RCA 47-7992b, #31) Don Robertson October 15, 1961 2:04
    18. "I Slipped, I Stumbled, I Fell" Fred Wise and Ben Weisman November 8, 1960 1:35

    The 2006 Follow That Dream reissue
    disc 1
    1. "There's Always Me" 2:19
    2. "Give Me The Right" 2:36
    3. "It's a Sin" 2:44
    4. "Sentimenal Me" 2:34
    5. "Starting Today" 2:06
    6. "Gently" 2:18
    7. "I'm Comin' Home" 2:24
    8. "In Your Arms" 1:52
    9. "Put The Blame On Me" 2:00
    10. "Judy" 2:14
    11. "I Want You With Me" 2:15
    12. "I Slipped, I Stumbled, I Fell" 1:39
    13. "I Feel So Bad" 2:55
    14. "Little Sister" 2:33
    15. "(Marie's The Name Of) His Latest Flame" 2:09
    16. "Good Luck Charm" 2:26
    17. "Anything That's Part Of You" 2:07
    18. "There's Always Me" (take 1*) 2:27
    19. "Give Me The Right" (take 1) 3:00
    20. "It's a Sin" (takes 1*, 2) 3:58
    21. "Sentimental Me" (Take 1) 2:42
    22. "Starting Today" (take 1) 2:11
    23. "Gently" (takes 1, 2) 2:46
    24. "I'm Comin' Home" (take 2) 2:42
    25. "In Your Arms" (take 1) 2:13
    26. "Put The Blame On Me" (takes 1, 2) 2:52
    27. "Judy" (take 1) 3:16
    28. "I Want You With Me" (take 1) 2:26
    29. "Little Sister" (take 3) 2:55
    30. "(Marie's The Name Of) His Latest Flame" (take 2) 2:26
    31. "Anything That's Part Of You" (take 1)

    disc 2
    1. "I'm Coming Home" (takes 1*, 3) 3:24
    2. "I'm Coming Home" (takes 5*, 4) 4:40
    3. "Gently" (take 3) 2:33
    4. "Gently" (take 4*) 2:25
    5. "Give Me The Right" (takes 3*, 2) 3:14
    6. "I Feel So Bad" (take 1) 3:00
    7. "There's Always Me" (take 2) 2:34
    8. "There's Always Me" (take 4) 2:49
    9. "Starting Today" (take 2) 2:12
    10. "Judy" (takes 2*, 3) 2:42
    11. "Judy" (take 4) 2:00
    12. "(Marie's The Name Of) His Latest Flame" (take 1) 2:44
    13. "(Marie's The Name Of) His Latest Flame" (takes 3, 4) 2:27
    14. "(Marie's The Name Of) His Latest Flame" (takes 5, 6) 4:03
    15. "Little Sister" (takes 1, 2, 4, 5) 2:03
    16. "Little Sister" (take 6) 2:36
    17. "Good Luck Charm" (take 1) 2:48
    18. "Good Luck Charm" (takes 2*, 3*) 1:50
    19. "Anything That's Part Of You" (take 2) 2:14
    20. "Anything That's Part Of You" (takes 4, 5) 2:35
    21. "Anything That's Part Of You" (take 8) 2:27
    22. "There's Always Me" (takes 5*, 6*, 7*, 8*, 9) 4:17
    23. "Judy" (takes 5, 6*, 7*) 4:24
    24. "(Marie's The Name Of) His Latest Flame" (takes 10*, 11*, 12) 3:42
    25. "Little Sister" (takes 7*, 8*, 9) 4:17
    26. "Anything That's Part Of You" (take 9*) 2:15
    --------------------------------------------------------
    So here we have another very good Elvis standard album release.
    With so many soundtrack albums, the sixties was a little sparse on standard album releases, but what we do get is very worthwhile. I can't help feeling looking back that the soundtrack albums, although often very good and certainly containing some great songs, even in some cases some special songs, somewhat stalled Elvis' career, hence the comeback special.
    It's not like Elvis' had gone anywhere, nor was it as if he wasn't releasing good songs and albums, but changes were afoot in the music industry.
    Around this time in the US a band called the Beach Boys were starting off, Motown signed the Supremes, The British invasion bands were learning the ropes in the pubs and clubs .... Bob Dylan was floating around New York honing his skills. Times were really a' changin'.
    In the meantime Elvis was focussing on a Career in movies and maintaining a music career with soundtracks, a few singles and a studio album here and there, but in reality this focus on the movie world was keeping him a little blind to the changes in the music industry .... in my opinion. The Elvis legacy, I think, would look a lot different if Elvis had decided to walk away from the stereotyped Hollywood scripts and dive back into his first love sooner. If he had been on the front end of the sixties music revolution, who knows what we would be talking about now.
    Anyhow, i waffle a little ...
    This is a very good album.

    What are your thoughts on this album?
    Give us the lowdown on anything about this album that means something to you.
    If you happened to be around at the time of its release, please give us some insight into what the feeling was about it at the time. Could you all see the face of music changing?
    It is hard, to a degree fifty + years down the track to know what was happening in reality. So we just have speculation and hindsight. Any info straight form the horses mouth, so to speak, would be beautiful.
    I will hit the first couple of tunes tomorrow, but in the meantime please give us some of this information, if you feel comfortable to do so.
    Cheers,
    Mark
     
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  14. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    I have to kind of disagree with you here. I do admit the piano riff is close to the Willis version, but I hear more aggressive drums and some more intricate guitar work throughout the tune. Its hard to match Hank Garland any time he makes a contribution to a session. I still think that its hard to match Elvis's sultry vocals as well as Garland, Harman, Moore and Cramer on the rhythm section, but maybe that's my bias. And of course, Bill Porter's great engineering just makes the whole endeavor a sonic delight. I appreciate the original by Willis, but I find it no match for Elvis's cover.
     
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  15. S. P. Honeybunch

    S. P. Honeybunch Presidente de Kokomo

    Location:
    California
    Something For Everybody

    The song quality isn't so great and even the "Rhythm Side" feels tame in comparison to the more upbeat tracks on Elvis is Back. The singles from this time period are fantastic, though.
     
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  16. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    I really do love Something For Everybody as it is a true sonic delight with some of Elvis's very best vocals that he ever layed down on tape. This album could have come much closer to rivaling the Elvis Is Back! album, if they had included that original twelfth song, I Feel So Bad or any one of those great singles that he recorded around the same time that got relegated to Gold Record packages. Another missed opportunity that could have made a very good album even greater. I still think it has some of Elvis's sweetest and most delicate vocal work on songs like Eddy Arnold's It's A Sin, There's Always Me, and Starting Today. I do agree with @mark winstanley that warning signs were in the air with the movie and publishing interests that were going to stagnant Elvis's recording career in a significant way throughout the middle 1960's until he slightly broke away from some of those confines in the latter part of that decade.
     
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  17. ClausH

    ClausH Forum Resident

    Location:
    Denmark
    I have heard four different U.S. pressings of Something for Everybody. Hollywood and Indianapolis pressings with Living Stereo on the labels. The orange label 1971 flex pressing (indianapolis) and the 1977 (?) pressing.
    The Indianapolis Living Stereo and the orange label are almost indistinguishable and the 77 pressing also sounds great. The Hollywood pressing still sounds very good but it's the least impressive of the bunch.
     
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  18. PacificOceanBlue

    PacificOceanBlue Forum Resident

    Location:
    The Southwest
    This LP suffered in part from the singles being separated from the album, much more so than with "Elvis Is Back!" It was a fine LP, with sublime vocal work, but the material was not as uniformly strong as the previous secular album, and it showed. From here, it would be a downhill slide over the next several years with soundtracks consisting largely of diminishing quality and the end of focused, purposeful mainstream secular albums.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  19. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    March 25 1961 live in Pearl harbour
     
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  20. DirkM

    DirkM Forum Resident

    Location:
    MA, USA
    Something For Everybody is probably my favourite Elvis album. It's definitely the one I listen to the most, as it's one of a handful of albums that I instinctively reach for when I'm not sure what I want to hear next. I admit that the lyrics are fairly lightweight, but the music is just so attractive, and Elvis' vocals so warm, that it doesn't really matter to me. Plus, I have a weak spot for albums that close with total throwaways (c.f. The Queen Is Dead, Brotherhood, More Than A New Discovery).

    I'm glad the singles weren't included, actually. (Marie's The Name) His Latest Flame/Little Sister makes for a fantastic stand-alone single, and I don't think either side would fit in very well with the rest of SFE. At the risk of losing what little Elvis credibility I may have left, I really don't like I Feel So Bad, Good Luck Charm, or Anything That's Part of You. The piano riff in I Feel So Bad is sort of irritating, and none of the melodies particularly appeal to me. Take 1 of Good Luck Charm has a bit more of a spark to it than the master does, but it's still not a song that I return to very often.
     
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  21. HE1NZ

    HE1NZ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Russia
    1960-61 stereo music sounds really good, especially Elvis records. Better than almost anything from the rest of the 60s. Not sure why.
     
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  22. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    I always find it remarkable that Elvis had fantastic stereo albums from 60-61 ... and the Beatles and many of the other later sixties bands seemed to struggle. My understanding is the US had better equipment but I am not well versed in the early stereo side of things.
     
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  23. HE1NZ

    HE1NZ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Russia
    The Rolling Stones had a session in Chess Studio in 1964 and it sounds a generation ahead of their other material sonic wise. But it was recorded in stereo only in 2-tracks. I think drop in quality has to do with introduction of 4-track recordings that were difficult to mix in stereo.
     
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  24. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    I believe that our fine host @Steve Hoffman would tell us all that a lot of the great stereo sound on Elvis's early 60's records were also due to the efforts and talent of recording engineer Bill Porter at RCA Studio B in Nashville.
     
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  25. MaestroDavros

    MaestroDavros Forum Resident

    Location:
    D.C. Metro Area
    Well to put it into perspective, in the US some labels were already recording their artists onto 8-track multitrack as early as 1958, whereas the Brits were accomplishing at best 2-track by the early 1960's. So there was a clear technology gap that existed at the time.
     

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