Elvis Presley - The Albums and Singles Thread pt2 The Sixties

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by mark winstanley, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. SKATTERBRANE

    SKATTERBRANE Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    Can't Help Falling In Love was the biggest let down for me on this album. I love the original and the TV Special version is great, but his "but I, I, I can't help" really ruins it for me.
     
    PepiJean and mark winstanley like this.
  2. Iceman08

    Iceman08 Forum Resident

    I played this song for my then venezolan girlfriend and I thought he did a good job but she just laughed. :)
     
    RSteven and mark winstanley like this.
  3. Dave112

    Dave112 Forum Resident

    I like the Bee Gees version but LOVE Elvis' version of this. Again, his arrangement takes this to another level. I also like Lynn Anderson's version from 1970. She just happens to be backed up by the Jordanaires.


    Lynn Anderson - Words
     
    Shawn, RSteven and mark winstanley like this.
  4. artfromtex

    artfromtex Honky Tonkin' Metal-Head

    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    Thanks. I ordered photo #5.
     
    MRamble, Shawn, RSteven and 1 other person like this.
  5. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    Bublé's voice is not for everybody that is for sure. I love it for what it is but it is very different from Presley's that is for sure. His timber, phrasing and style is more similar to Sinatra or Crosby's style of singing, which some might find slightly too monotone for their taste. I can appreciate that style of singing myself, but Elvis's voice has a lot more subtle shadings and range than any of those singers that I mentioned. The funny thing is as I mentioned somewhere before on this thread, Bublé's very favorite singer is Elvis, even though he knows his voice is way better suited for Bobby Darin or Frank Sinatra styled songs.
     
  6. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    You nailed it for me with your fantastic comments regarding both the live and studio versions of arguably Elvis's most iconic song. The only thing I would add is this fantastic description form Jerry Hopkins splendid first bio of Elvis in 1971:

    In this, a heavy production number utilizing the full orchestra, Elvis told the story of getting "caught in a trap," loving a girl and knowing it couldn't go on--with suspicious minds. He also turned the stage into a karate mat, kicking and slashing and tumbling like a man fighting his way out of the most incredible Western brawl ever devised in Hollywood. Never missing a note...There was another standing ovation.

    Now that we are wrapping up the great live portion of this album with these last three songs, I thought it might be interesting to compare this album with another artist from this time period that Elvis admired a lot. Tom Jones Live In Las Vegas At The Flamingo came out exactly the same year in 1969. It was also well documented that Elvis went to several of Tom Jones concerts to gain a better feel of the type of show Elvis wanted to stage for his comeback in that town, because he did not want to emulate the typical Vegas show by Frank Sinatra or Tony Bennet. Although Elvis did not copy Jones in any respect as far as moves or mannerisms were concerned as the very inept biographer Albert Goldman basically once suggested, Elvis did probably recognize that Tom Jones performance, with its raw sex component and blending of R & B and popular music genres, was probably as close to a template as he was going to find for his show in Las Vegas. Jones also put together a sizzling band, whose rhythm core was made up of three of the best musicians to ever come out of England; Big Jim Sullivan on lead guitar (who was possibly the most prolific and respected studio guitarist in England up to that time, bassist John Rostill (yeah that same guy who would go on to write hits songs for Olivia Newton John), and drummer Chris Slade, who could give Ronnie Tutt a pretty good fight for how best to kick their favorite singer in the rear with their energetic and fantastic workouts on the sticks. A great horn section, sounding like it was right out of Muscle Shoals or Memphis, provides the orchestrations. Check out Jones great versions of Otis Redding's Hard To Handle, Bobby Bland's Turn On Your Love Light, and listen to Jones reinterpret two of Elvis's favorite songs; Danny Boy and I Can't Stop Loving You. This is a terrific companion to Elvis's Vegas album, although Elvis's live album is more rocking and R & B sounding and Tom's is more in soulful ballad and R & B mode. Tom also lacks Elvis subtle singing touch in my opinion as he tends to come at every song in full throttle voice, but it is still a fun listen.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  7. czeskleba

    czeskleba Senior Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    For me it's not the musical style but his voice itself that just doesn't connect with me. I have a pretty comprehensive Sinatra collection, and a smattering of albums by Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Judy Garland and Sammy Davis, so I do enjoy a lot of stuff in that style. But I just don't like Buble's voice. Maybe it's the nasal quality, maybe it's simply that sometimes we encounter voices that rub us the wrong way. It probably doesn't help that most of the stuff I've heard him sing has been standards that have definitive versions by others, and it's hard not to compare his versions unfavorably to those. Anyway, sorry for the thread tangent.
     
  8. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    It is so interesting how a certain singer's voice can hit us the right way or just drive us nuts. I have to admit that I have never heard anybody else describe his voice as nasally, but I have heard him get criticized for sounding too close to Sinatra at times, especially with regards to song arrangements early in his career. The funny thing is that he writes virtually all of his own original hit singles like Home and Haven't Meet You Yet, and Bublé himself came up with the key signature part of the arrangement for his re-working of Cry Me A River that is now almost universally copied by every singer on American Idol or The Voice, since his stellar version was released some seven years ago.
     
    mark winstanley and Dave112 like this.
  9. SKATTERBRANE

    SKATTERBRANE Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    The only singers I like that fit that genre' is Dean Martin and especially Bobby Darin.
     
    mark winstanley, Dave112 and RSteven like this.
  10. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    I really love Dino's smooth chops and his great personality on stage and off. I also think that Bobby Darin was fantastic and probably Michael Bublé's biggest inspiration for his music career. Darin is the closest one to match his skills as both a vocalist and a songwriter.
     
    mark winstanley and Dave112 like this.
  11. RSteven

    RSteven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brookings, Oregon
    If this book is half as gorgeous as his previous ones, King Of The Jungle and King Of Las Vegas, it should be almost worth the price. I have the other two books already, and I have ordered this new one based on the very succinct points your mention above.
     
    Spencer R and mark winstanley like this.
  12. GillyT

    GillyT Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wellies, N.Z
    I remember the disdain for Elvis by the UK punks in particular, but it was hard to sustain when it became obvious how big an influence Elvis - especially the 50s Elvis - was on the early punk scene. Joey and Johnny Ramone were HUGE Elvis fans, as was Joe Strummer. As I'm sure you're aware, the cover art of 'London Calling' was lifted directly from Elvis' first album in homage to the main man himself.

    I'd just turned 15 and punk was yet to hit these shores when Elvis died. My introduction to his music was the 'Sun Sessions' album, which I'm proud to say was my first ever Elvis purchase (still have it) that I bought after weeks of picking it up, putting it down, working my way through Roy Carr's excellent liner notes bit by bit every day after school. Finally I saved enough pocket money to buy it! Woo hoo!! Beat the bland excitement-free Eagles/Linda Ronstadt music being foisted on my generation by a country mile!

    The next album I heard was 'In Person', given to me by the owner of a second-hand record shop that I hung out in when I should've been at school, who had a bunch of Elvis albums with no covers (I also scored the 68 Comeback and On Stage LPs - all coverless). Being a teen with no money, I was over the moon! Those first four Elvis records I owned shaped my musical taste and encapsulated qualities that I would search for in the music of others. 'Johnny Be Good' and 'My Babe' were my go-to tracks. Energy and excitement plus! Most of my mates were into Led Zeppelin at that time and thought I'd taken leave of my senses. Haha. No regrets on that score.

    When I finally heard the Ramones, the Clash, the Buzzcocks, Stiff Little Fingers and many others of that era it felt like a natural progression. When Jerry Scheff described the intensity of his playing during Elvis' '69 engagement - as "a kind of punk lounge music" I could've jumped for joy. He articulated exactly what my 15 year old ears heard and fell in love with.

    Just a few fond thoughts/memories about this album.
     
    artfromtex, Revelator, DirkM and 8 others like this.
  13. Purple Jim

    Purple Jim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Little Britain
    At the time, the disdain was for the fat Elvis in his ridiculous glittery pyjamas. However, 50s Elvis was the epitome cool. One can't generalise though. Some people liked him, some didn't or didn't have an opinion (whether that was "punk" musicians or fans).

    The NME front page when he died:

    [​IMG]

    REMEMBER HIM THIS WAY
     
    mark winstanley and When In Rome like this.
  14. GillyT

    GillyT Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wellies, N.Z
    Yeah well Johnny Rotten isn't exactly an oil painting these days...lol.
     
  15. PepiJean

    PepiJean Forum Resident

    For me, Elvis was the epitome of cool in the 1955 / 1956 era and during the taping of the '68 special.
    He still looked good between 1957 and 1970, but something changed after that. It's almost like a different person.
     
  16. Dave112

    Dave112 Forum Resident

    That's kind of the way it goes, isn't it? Sometimes we get so wrapped up in these artists' music, that we forget that they have lives and interests beyond music. They get lazy, disgusted, even rebellious at doing what the public wants them to do. Most fans lament when The Beatles broke up but it's selfishly because the public didn't get any more new music from that band. The members were ready to try something different because each of them were older and had diverse visions of what they would like to do. Elvis also had so many facets of his career (even during those movie years he still had some great music). A rockabilly novelty that evolved and took the world by storm. A soldier that came back and became a top box office draw and best selling recording artist again. An award winning and renowned gospel artist. A legendary live performer that few have even come close to equaling his stage presence. In the end, there was a kind of shell that was left of him. If he hadn't died when he did, only a radical set of changes could have saved his life. The public ridiculed Elvis and he was the poster boy for rock and roll fame burn out and excess. Even John Lennon took a poke with the "Elvis died in the army" quip. Lennon should have easily empathized with the unending demands made from a public that just wanted more and more but he didn't give Elvis a pass either. In the end, real life consumes us all but not acquiescing to natural changes in life will speed up the process.
     
    DirkM, EPA4368, GillyT and 8 others like this.
  17. Iceman08

    Iceman08 Forum Resident

    Absolutely, amen. Like you I couldn't believe it when I read the list. At least "Elvis Is Back!" and "From Elvis In Memphis" should have sold altogether a LOT more in the last 5-10 years since everybody agrees that these are two of his best albums. "Back In Memphis" also is especially low in sales (even lower than "Speedway"!). When you compare their sales to OST like "G.I. Blues" , "Blue Hawaii" or even "Spinout"- unbelievable! And nearly all the Camden/ Pickwick releases went over 1 million- I can only imagine they sold so well because of their cheap prices? Otherwise I'm going crazy right now. :laughup:
    I guess his 1st christmas album and surprisingly his 2nd xmas album sold so excellent because of countless re-releases nearly every single year around xmas time in so many different packages? I think I've read somewhere that when a themed CD compilation includes a whole original album the sales of this new release are added to the sales of the original one?
     
    RSteven and mark winstanley like this.
  18. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    I don't know, but it is possible... The record biz is a weird biz
     
  19. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    Inherit The Wind
    Written By :
    Eddie Rabbitt

    Recorded :

    American Studios, Memphis, January 13-16 and 20-23, 1969: January 21, 1969. splice takes 1 and 2

    The Back in Memphis album starts with this great song, and although I would have seen it before, it is now drawn to my attention that this is Eddie Rabbit - that I am assuming is the "I Love A Rainy Night" Eddie. I don't know much about Eddie, but I know my dad thought he was pretty good.
    Anyway, we start with a moderately driving beat embellished by strings and then Elvis comes in. This song is about a wanderer and in so many ways that theme suits Elvis.
    The pre-chorus is great, and leads into an equally good chorus. I think the writing here shows Eddie to be a very good writer. This is a ballad in the real sense of the word, and Elvis carries it off beautifully.
    Again, as with the From Elvis In Memphis album, we have a great arrangement, with the right layers coming in at the right time.
    I know that for some Elvis fans, this song will be a little string heavy, but in context it suits the song perfectly. It's nice to see that he sung this live on occasion.
    I know some folks have said they aren't that taken with the first couple of songs on this album, but I really see them as great Elvis songs that set the scene for the album.... and probably more so, the direction which he was going to take.
    For some reason with this album it is a better album when I have it on the player, than when I look at the tracklist ... if that makes any sense to anyone.

     
  20. Purple Jim

    Purple Jim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Little Britain
    However, right from the very beginning, Elvis wasn't just about rockabilly. From the word go, he had that melting pot going on with his repertoire and records featuring not only rockabilly but also R&B, Doo-Wap, country, blues, gospel,...
     
    Dave112, RSteven and mark winstanley like this.
  21. Purple Jim

    Purple Jim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Little Britain
    Well, one must compare what is comparable. At 42 (the age that Elvis died), Johnny looked pretty good:

    [​IMG]
     
    mark winstanley likes this.
  22. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    I enjoy Buble in an interview, he is a funny and interesting guy. I am not a fan of his music, but I am not really into crooners
     
    RSteven likes this.
  23. Iceman08

    Iceman08 Forum Resident

    I agree with you. And he had such a great fashion thinking in the 50s & 60s. Of course he looked great in the first jumpsuits in 1969-70 (because he was in great shape). But then he wore them for another year...and another year...and yet another year...and etc. etc. He wore them 7 long years. It's like he became to total different person in a short time period.
     
    RSteven and mark winstanley like this.
  24. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Pick up a fast car, burn my name in the road Thread Starter

    ahhh ... it's interesting when you don't get notifications from your own thread lol ...
    Anyway ... Elvis And Johnny Rotten (Lydon) are chalk and cheese..
    Elvis never set out to upset anyone, in spite of doing so. Johnny's whole schtick was trying to get a reaction.....
    As much could be said about some of Johnny's hairstyles as Elvis' suits, so that's all a little redundant to me.
    Two completely different personalities in two completely different times of music.
    With the addiction issues, it would make more sense to compare Elvis to Sid ..... but Sid didn't have one ounce of musical talent, and if being cool involves having snot all over your face, I'm out.
     
    GillyT and RSteven like this.
  25. Purple Jim

    Purple Jim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Little Britain
    I just checked that song out (never heard it before). Not really my sort of Elvis thing. However my wife was sitting next to me and when she it heard playing she said "Wow. He gets me every time".
     
    artfromtex, RSteven, Iceman08 and 2 others like this.

Share This Page