EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    It was his curse for buying into that Ayn Rand bs
     
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  2. Grant

    Grant Spring break

    Location:
    United States
    Yeah, but we have to deal with his voice!
     
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  3. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I hated "Please Don't Go". Really whiny piece of work. Was never big on ballads in general, especially ones I found annoying.

    It was a huge hit though, after a couple of years (almost) out of the limelight for K.C.

    I thought this one came up earlier in the thread. It was a #1 hit - his last chart topper.

    His last Top 10 hit - a #2 that I far preferred to "Please Don't Go" - would come out right about now, early December, 1979. It entered the Top 40 the week of December 29th - it always takes me right back to this period whenever I hear it.
     
  4. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    We'll get to it . . . :D
     
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  5. Grant

    Grant Spring break

    Location:
    United States
    You and I are opposite on this. I greatly prefer "Please Don't Go" and really don't care for his duet with Terri DeSario. I prefer the original 60s R&B hit by Barbara Mason.
     
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  6. thecdguy

    thecdguy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia, Pa.
    "Please Don't Go" hasn't been brought up yet, at least not by the OP. Before we get to it, there's still another song about liking a particular drink and being rained upon.
     
  7. Grant

    Grant Spring break

    Location:
    United States
    This is my fault! I once again got this thread and the Billboard R&B thread mixed up where we are at the end of the decade. Sorry!
     
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  8. MielR

    MielR THIS SPACE FOR RENT

    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    "Give It Up" was a hit, and was originally from the album All In A Night's Work which was actually credited to "KC and the Sunshine Band". However he later released the song credited to just "KC" on his own label when Epic refused to release a US single.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  9. Dougd

    Dougd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Fla.
    The next No. 1, the one before Please Don't Go, made chart history.
    But, we will discuss that when it comes up.
     
  10. MikeInFla

    MikeInFla Forum Resident

    Location:
    Panama City, FL
    DeYoung on the term:

    Corporate rock? Who you calling corporate rock? Styx co-founder Dennis DeYoung, speaking to In the Studio, fires back at the old pejorative hurled Styx’s way after they began racking up platinum sales in the late 1970s.

    “Styx never took a dime in endorsements from anybody — and we were offered endorsements all the time, for everything,” DeYoung tells radio host Redbeard. “We never took a dime for our tours. We always funded everything we did ourselves. The idea of us being corporate rock was nonsense from the beginning. It was something that was made up in someone else’s mind. The band only ever did what it did best — which was write the best songs they could, record them and play the best shows they knew how.”

    Styx never took a dime from anybody. I still get offers. I got an offer from Burger King for ‘The Best of Times,’ and I said no. I figured it was going to end up being ‘The Best of Fries.'”
     
  11. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Next is "Escape (The Pina Colada Song)" by Rupert Holmes, #1 for 3 non consecutive weeks, December 16 - December 29, 1979, and again from January 6 - January 12, 1980.

     
  12. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    The only #1 in the history of Infinity Records - which was already out of business by the time this peaked, its roster (including Mr. Holmes) having been absorbed into MCA.
     
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  13. Hoover Factory

    Hoover Factory Old Dude Who Knows Things

    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    I don’t like the song.

    I also think a pina coladas is a lousy drink.
     
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  14. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Not BS, it makes perfect sense
     
  15. Wild Horse

    Wild Horse Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    Escape (The Pina Colada Song)

    Somebody please make it stop.


    Okay, the story is kinda cute

    ... the first time you hear it.
     
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  16. Wild Horse

    Wild Horse Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    Since we're at the end of the 70s, I want to post my choice for the song from that decade that most deserved to hit number one but didn't ...




    It stalled at #2 in the summer of 1975. One of the best songs of the 1970s, IMO. Sublime.
     
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  17. Pina coladas are crappy. The song somewhat less so.
     
  18. Definitely should have been #1. Different , weird and catchy. What kept it out of the top slot anyway? It was #2 for three weeks. Probably some inanity like ' Thank God I'm A Country Boy ' I seem to remember that one being out at the same time. " Life ain't nothing but a funny funny riddle , pancakes on the griddle, playing my fiddle , piggy in the middle.." Good God.
     
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  19. Wild Horse

    Wild Horse Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    :D

    The Hustle, One of These Nights and Jive Talkin' kept it out of the number one spot.

    Must have been frustrating for 10cc to watch all those songs leap frog over it.
     
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  20. ChrisScooter1

    ChrisScooter1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, GA
    You’d have to pin that on Neil Peart, not Ged...Ged had to sing it, but he didn’t write it.
     
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  21. ChrisScooter1

    ChrisScooter1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens, GA
    Apples to oranges...I don’t find it
    Yep. Apples to oranges. Both Barry’s falsetto or Ged’s potently piercing high vocals are both fodder for dislike, from usually completely different camps. I actually liked both of them, but not for any similarity in their timbre, simply because of their range. But I also understand why they were disliked as well. We may get to them in another year or two, but I think Rush’s chart success was definitely helped when Ged lowered his pitch and avoided the really high notes.
     
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  22. ronm

    ronm audiofreak

    Location:
    southern colo.
    This takes me back to my sisters basement in Denver the summer of '75.I would listen to radio hits through a RCA pecan wood table am/FM radio.It was a strange song I always thought..."be quiet stop crying".
     
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  23. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Oh, I loved this one - hey, I was 11 - and what a perfect hit to straddle the transition from the '70s to the '80s. Definitely tapped into the cultural and political zeitgeist, in its own affable, Yacht Rockified way.

    It's appropriate that the last #1 hit of the '70s was a story song with a twist. A great way to cap off the decade that sent "Dark Lady" and "The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia" (among others) to the top. We'd be seeing far fewer of these in the '80s.

    For a songwriter, Rupert Holmes is really effective as a performer. He comes across like a laid back Barry Manilow without the Broadway affectations. "Escape" is a great example of why people call this subgenre of pop "Yacht Rock" - it's full of references to the shore and the tropics (Pina Coladas, dunes of the cape, the feel of the ocean) - and has an almost-reggae inflected beat. It's vaguely reminiscent of Jimmy Buffett, without the touches of country music.

    Critics of course savaged this sexist paean to monogamy, lyrically too clever by half, but it was perfectly in sync with the times even if it quickly became a punchline.

    Holmes probably hit a year too late to become a bigger star, although I loved his subsequent single "Him", and I think it's both more adventuresome (I'm not sure if the hooting is lame or genius, but it's certainly different) and has aged better than "Escape".
     
  24. Jo B

    Jo B Forum Resident

    Location:
    Minnesota USA
    I dated a guy in college whose dad was somehow associated with Styx, tour manager possibly. He would occasionally call and tell him airline tickets for him & I were at the airport to fly to one of their shows, maybe four or five times this happened. Neither one of us was particularly crazy about Styx but his dad was great and really treated us to a great weekend when we went.
     
  25. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Yup. We're entering into a period where the singles and albums charts only partially reflect one another. The #1 albums of 1979 in order were:

    Barbra Streisand's Greatest Hits, Volume 2 Barbra Streisand
    52nd Street Billy Joel
    Brief Case Full Of Blues Blues Brothers
    Blondes Have More Fun Rod Stewart
    Spirits Having Flown Bee Gees
    Minute By Minute The Doobie Brothers
    Breakfast In America Supertramp
    Bad Girls Donna Summer
    Get The Knack The Knack
    In Through The Out Door Led Zeppelin
    The Long Run Eagles

    I think only roughly half of those (I'm leaving out the hits collection) had a #1 single.
     
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