EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. MielR

    MielR THIS SPACE FOR RENT

    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Interestingly, there's actually another video edit for Please Don't Go, shot at the same time, but using totally different shots/takes than the one above:
     
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  2. Hoover Factory

    Hoover Factory Old Dude Who Knows Things

    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    My Top 20 Favorite Number 1’s from the 1970s:

    I Want You Back - Jackson 5
    Listen to What the Man Said - Paul McCartney & Wings
    Venus - Shocking Blue
    Let it Be - The Beatles
    Cracklin Rosie - Neil Diamond
    Tears of a Clown - Smokey Robinson & the Miracles
    Heart of Gold - Neil Young
    We’re an American Band - Grand Funk Railroad
    Photograph - Ringo Starr
    Time in a Bottle - Jim Croce
    Bennie & the Jets - Elton John
    Laughter in the Rain - Neil Sedaka
    Shinning Star - Earth, Wind, & Fire
    Get Down Tonight - KC & the Sunshine Band
    Fame - David Bowie
    Saturday Night - Bay City Rollers
    Play That Funky Music - Wild Cherry
    New Kid in Town - The Eagles
    Pop Muzik - M
    My Sharona - The Knack
     
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  3. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    They didn't have "numerous" hits. They had 4 Top 10 hits - including two enormous #1 hits - and one #38 hit. And that was it for the Top 40. Their chart performance before "Le Freak" wasn't particularly impressive (a #6 hit, one that didn't chart, and a #38), they scored two immense #1s in less than a year, plus a #7, then vanished from the charts for good.

    Hence why I said they were superstars for a moment and then they were gone. Because they were hotter than the surface of the sun and then cold as the far side of Pluto, all within the span of less than a year. We talk about the Bee Gees being destroyed by the implosion of disco, but their fall wasn't anywhere near as total as that of Chic. The Bee Gees still managed to chart a #30 in 1981 and a #24 in 1983. Chic were just gone.

    Look at the discography for yourself. Charts don't lie.
     
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  4. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Ironic that I’ve always really enjoyed this band, but never liked that song much even though it builds nicely and the harp is nicely used. Good production for that band, but it just didn’t quite click for me. Really glad they got to out on such a high note. I know they had one or two more chart entries, but for me that album was the end of the line for their classic sound.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
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  5. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I was never big on ballads, and found this one particularly weedy and annoying. It's more coherent than Lionel's last entry, the annoying, rambling "Still", but Mr. Richie demolished KC as a singer. Ballads - in particular this one - don't do his voice any favors.

    The '80s weren't getting off to a promising start. The early '80s are pretty awful compared to the charts from the late '70s, and this song's a good example of that. Has nostalgia value for me, but that's about it.
     
  6. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    KC...definitely not a ballad singer. Still, they probably knew their sound was getting tired and they were on borrowed time. It paid off that they tried something new, even though it wasn’t my thing, but I doubt that would have worked a second time. I don’t remember if there were any ballads on the next album (The Painter?) but I do remember not liking a single thing on it.
     
  7. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I did. I'm just saying that using words or phrases makes things sound a lot worse than they were. Remember, back in the 70s and 80s, a top 40 song was very respected. especially since the field was so crowded. Not like today where it's all or nothing.
     
  8. MielR

    MielR THIS SPACE FOR RENT

    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    There actually were a few ballads on that album, the best probably being a Donna Summer song called All Through The Night that I think KC did a pretty good job on:
     
  9. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    In that shot, KC seemed to almost resemble another "KC" - American Top 40's Casey Kasem.

    But I seem to recall that not only was this their last #1, but also T.K.'s. The label would last only one more year before Henry Stone's empire collapsed.

    It's also one which it was ages since this was last played on the radio.
     
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  10. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Makng shure its write

    Please Don't Go - Please do go, KC, you've overstayed your welcome. Never thought I'd hear a such a boring snoozer from the king of disco party records. Wake me up for the next #1.
     
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  11. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    Were they on their way out by then? It seems like it.
     
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  12. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Another bloody Yank down under...

    I agree, but then the late '80s were so horrible as to make this period sound pretty good to me.
    I've heard of "Please Don't Go", but I'm not sure if I've ever heard it. This, interestingly, was at the tail end of a few years of my early childhood where I do remember pretty well what was on the radio. For example, I remember hearing "Music Box Dancer" all the time, and in a few months, Bette Midler's biggest hit to date. But after the summer of 1980, nothing until I started listening to AT40 in late 1987. My best guess as to why is that my parents bought their first house in April 1980 (before that we lived in apartments) and with the additional space, I was less likely to overhear the radio. Or maybe they just stopped listening to the radio anyway. (We didn't have cable until years later, so no MTV for the time being - and yes, I know it didn't start until 1981 - and when we did get it, I was big into oldies and couldn't have cared less about then-current stuff.)
     
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  13. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    They seemed to straddle the fence here - starting with ballad territory, then slowly moving up to their "dance" grooves - albeit at a slower tempo than their numbers up to this point.

    Meanwhile, here's KC's other hit of the period, duetting with Teri DeSario on this cover of the old Barbara Mason chestnut from 1965 (another one you hardly hear anymore):
     
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  14. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    In a sense, one could see with this #1, that title seemed to be KC's message to his audience. After this, they (meaning, the audience) went.
     
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  15. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    It wasn't just in "the field." There were far more record companies and places to go to have your product put out than today.
     
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  16. bare trees

    bare trees Forum Resident

    "Please Don't Go" is a guilty pleasure for me. It might be repetitive and and the lyrics are terrible but I love how the vocal melody melds with the instrmental track.
     
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  17. Wild Horse

    Wild Horse Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    Please Don't Go

    It's okay, but it's no "Get Down Tonight" or "That's The Way I Like It". Although, I guess it's not trying to be.

    Kind of a weak start for the first 80s #1.

    The next one coming up would have been a better start.*


    *it appears that Pina Colada thing comes back again first for a few weeks before the next new #1, probably because it missed annoying a few people the first time.
     
  18. Wild Horse

    Wild Horse Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    Yep. They pretty much disappeared in the 80s, never to return.
     
  19. Jo B

    Jo B Forum Resident

    Location:
    Minnesota USA
    The video is very 1980 that now ends up being a bit distracting in a checking for fire suppressing sprinklers kind of way, but the song holds up rather nicely.
     
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  20. Glenpwood

    Glenpwood Hyperactive!

    Not to nitpick this statement but Helen's albums easily outsold Cher's & probably equaled Diana in the seventies. Reddy had seven albums in a row peak between six to sixteen. Because of that weird RIAA rule, most of her million sellers pre 1976 show as gold only except I Am Woman which Capitol paid to recertify in the nineties as Platinum & her Greatest Hits set as Double Platinum. Her last gold record, Music Music, was her only true half million seller in the string.

    Cher had two million sellers in the 70's, the Cher aka GT&T album & Half Breed, then a gold disc for Take Me Home, even though Casablanca was notorious for flooding the marketplace with LPs that didn't actually sell to up their marketplace share. She never really started selling albums in a big way until her Geffen years and beyond.

    As much as love Diana, she only really had 6 albums in the 70's that either sold gold or platinum- the two self titled sets, Lady Sings The Blues, Diana & Marvin, The Boss, and Touch Me In The Morning. Her only album of the decade that Motown allowed the RIAA to certify was The Boss. That puts her on about equal footing with Reddy but probably only surpasses her due to Motown putting out plenty of mild selling fodder like TV Soundtracks, a pair of Live albums, and the albums that only spawned minor hits like Baby It's Me.
     
  21. MielR

    MielR THIS SPACE FOR RENT

    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Let's not forget there was also a version in Spanish- Por Favor No Te Vayas:
     
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  22. tmoore

    tmoore Forum Resident

    Location:
    Olney, MD
    I remember thinking/hoping on January 1, 1980 that the '80s would be a return to the '60s, musically. I mean that in terms of --- experimentation with artist development being uppermost, not the bottom line. Of course, that turned out not to be the case, but now that we are just about 40 years out from THAT, it is obvious in retrospect that things couldn't go back to the way they were.

    I do like about the first third of the '80s, musically. But around the fall of 1983, the music and me began to part ways. I'll talk about this more when we get there. (that's not to say that I don't like any songs dating from 1984 or later. It's just that, as a percentage of the whole, there are far fewer of them)

    Before we leave the '70s, to me that remains the most interesting decade of music, from start to finish, in terms of variety. The #1 songs are just a part of it. I'm also talking about artists that never saw the Top 40. It has been interesting to read the other posts above here listing people's favorite songs. I'll hold off on doing that, because if I make a post like that I want it to be comprehensive --- which requires a lot of thought --- which requires time that I don't have to spare right now.

    I have a lot of self-burned CDs (with favorite tracks), and a large percentage of them have '70s music on them.
     
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  23. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I looked ahead and my opinion of many #1s in 1981 and 1982 will be much more negative.

    The 60s and 70s were the best! The quirky stuff, stuff people here have expressed hate for like "Run Joey, Run", "Me And You And A Dog Named Boo", "Telephone Man", and many other records that never saw the top spot were among the best things about the 70s. And the variety was unparalleled! I love "Evil Boll-Weevil" by Grand Canyon.
     
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  24. The Slug Man

    The Slug Man Forum Resident

    Location:
    North Carolina
    "Please Don't Go"

    We may have reached the 80s, but it's not quite time to break out the Miami Vice suits, Swatches, parachute pants, and Rubik's cubes just yet. "Please Don't Go" seems like a plea by KC for his remaining fans not to turn their backs on him (or disco in general).
     
  25. The Slug Man

    The Slug Man Forum Resident

    Location:
    North Carolina
    I seem to remember an audio interview with John Lennon around the time of his final album coming out in 1980, shortly before he died, where he said something to that effect. "Weren't the '70s a drag? Let's try to make the '80s more like the '60s." The closest the '80s would get to the 60s, however, would just come in the form of the natural 20-year-nostalgia cycle (kind of like what the '70s did for the '50s).
     
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