EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    It sure doesn't sound like it in the case of "Aquarius". The stereo mix is worth it just for what it does to the twinkling orchestral intro.

    My uncle had a huge singles collection, and the switch to stereo around '67-'68 was notable. Radio might have still been getting mono singles, but my uncle was buying everything in stereo by the time "Aquarius" dropped.
     
  2. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Yup, just what I was thinking. It came out at the exact wrong time, especially with that production / hair / makeup and costume design. If they'd gotten more creative on those fronts maybe they could have made it work in '79...
     
  3. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Mileage. My biggest problem with it is that it's still a collection of Frankenstein monsters cobbled together from multiple takes, and I think Spector did a far better job of it. The vocal take they use for the title track on Naked is just awful.
     
  4. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    The U.S. (as well as Canada) was one-up on the British in one regard: "Get Back" was the Fab Four's first such stereo single. By contrast, in the U.K. it would be their last mono single.

    Count me as preferring the 45 edit of this (with the add-on at the end that was missing from how it was presented on the Let It Be album).

    As for the B side, "Don't Let Me Down," has anyone noticed that, while in slow-tempo mode, it actually began to get even slower as the song progressed?
     
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  5. Grant

    Grant Life is a rock, but the radio rolled me!

    They went to stereo singles in 1974.
     
  6. Grant

    Grant Life is a rock, but the radio rolled me!

    I don't think there is any consensus on this forum about "Let It Be Naked" except for the way it was brickwalled. I also prefer it to Spector's nightmare.

    Bones Howe seemed to very carefully mix both so that they are close in sonics. Still, there are differences between the stereo and mono, and I greatly prefer the mono mixes. In my book, he is a fantastic all-around session guy: a fantastic engineer, a splendid producer, and a rock-solid drummer. I don't really want to go to his Facebook page, but I wonder if he is still active in the business.

    I wouldn't bet on it. Go back and check. It wasn't like albums where you could pick stereo or mono. Most labels made stereo albums starting in 1867 or 1968, but for 45s, it was still a mono world.

    Most commercial singles were still mono up to the end of 1971. Trust me on this. I, and a few of us collectors have been trying to get every top 40+ single from several decades. I've also been collecting 45s since the age of six, and the vast majority of 45s up to the beginning of 1972 are mono. And, if it sounds stereo, you can always verify things in a computer audio program. Trying to find mono singles in the digital age is very tough.
     
  7. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Another bloody Yank down under...

    "Get Back" is one of my favorite late-period Beatles singles, although by this time I mostly prefer the album tracks. "Don't Let Me Down" is my all time favorite of their songs.
     
  8. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Pretty sure he retired years ago. He was doing soundtracks for awhile in the '80s. Pity, because I think Howe was an absolute genius.

    Can't - uncle and his records are both long gone.
     
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  9. John B Good

    John B Good Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    NS, Canada
    I knew a girl called Loretta from high school in the mid 60s, and can still fantasize her in a low-neck sweater. :love:
     
  10. Tim S

    Tim S Senior Member

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    "Get Back" is certainly not a musical step forward for the Beatles, but it's a nice groovin' song. I don't know how it was recorded, but it sounds like a band playing together. Billy Preston adds a lot to the vibe, and I love his solo. I think having him there helped everyone chill with each other and just enjoy the music.
     
  11. California Couple

    California Couple dislike us on facebook

    Location:
    Newport Beach
    Get Back is such a basic song, the Beach Boys could have done it in '63 as the flip side of I Get Around. Despite my statement, I am surprised it made it to #1.
     
  12. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Huh? "Get Back" was certainly a musical step forward for The Beatles, being far more rooted in R&B and the blues than most of their material post-'66. It has that loose comfortable jam feel without the pretense you'd find on records like The Beatles, and signaled the band's return to their roots. It also presages the sound of the coming singer-songwriter movement, and it's a wonderful earworm on top of all that.

    There's certainly a retro-aspect to the track, but sorry, the freakin' Beach Boys never did anything this non-white.

    Preston is a big key to the song's success.
     
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  13. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Now that you mention it, the basic rhythm section, in the song's arrangement, does seem a bit similar to Tony Joe White's "Polk Salad Annie," dunnit? (More in the essence than in the point-by-point specifics.) Of course, there are no horns, but Preston's Fender Rhodes clearly percolates here. Paul McCartney seems to channel the kind of lead vocal one would find on, say, Canned Heat's "Going Up The Country." (I know some wisenheimers would've compared his vocals on this to Kermit the Frog.)

    Meanwhile, as this was riding high up the charts, they put out another record, which was really a John and Paul solo track (Lennon overdubbing both lead and rhythm guitar, McCartney on both bass and drums): "The Ballad of John and Yoko." Only went to #8, no doubt due to the lyrics. In the UK (where it was their first stereo single), it would be their last #1. Some out there vastly prefer George's B side "Old Brown Shoe."
     
  14. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Get Back is a middle of the pack Beatles song for me. I'll take Don't Let Me Down if I could only listen to one side of this single. I also preferred The Ballad Of John & Yoko - loved the travelogue! So many great tracks on the White lp that could have been hit singles but there was the whole we-don't-release-songs-to-singles-after-the-album-comes-out manifesto.
     
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  15. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    I always thought that this was the lost "hit" from Hair, the song that could have been a hit but never was. A beautiful song. I'm not sure I would have arranged it like this :), but it isn't half bad even jazzed up like this. Walking In Space is another amazing track from that show I've never heard anyone cover, although it's a bit more unusual and less poppy.
     
  16. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Wasn't Abbey Road the first Beatles album that didn't have a mono version? I think it was but I'm not 100% sure.
     
  17. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Yup.
     
  18. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    It's not for lack of bread... like the Grateful Dead... :edthumbs:
     
  19. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    I agree with that; the late seventies was probably the time the sixties were least relevant. But I was just talking about Hair as a piece of cinema. I think it works really well, and that Forman is/was an incredible director.

    I actually find recent sixties retro movies/TV shows to be much harder to watch. Nothing is more distracting than a guy wearing an obvious hippie wig. That Manson thing they had with Duchovny a year or two back was horrendous.
     
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  20. John54

    John54 Senior Member

    Location:
    Burlington, ON
    Dislike Get Back rather intensely. Almost as annoying as Hanky Panky and Dizzy, so we're scraping the bottom of the barrel for no. 1 hits and also for Beatles songs, as it's my least favourite there.

    The flip side, Don't Let Me Down, is not really my kind of music either but ironically it's well up among my favourite Beatles tracks, let's say the top two or three dozen anyway. Sometimes a song comes out that clicks a lot more than most in that style would; Daniel by Elton John is like that too.
     
  21. Mylene

    Mylene Senior Member

    I remember it from when it came out. I had no idea it was about drugs and transvestism at the time. 'California grass' was like the Petula Clark's 'other man's grass is always greener' to me.
     
  22. Mylene

    Mylene Senior Member

    I first heard Don't Let Me Down on a Get Back Sessions bootleg and thought it was an update on Norwegian Wood.
     
  23. snepts

    snepts Forum Resident

    Location:
    Eugene, OR
    I'm sincerely glad you enjoy the film HAIR. I've tried to watch it a couple of times recently, and I find it very difficult to embrace. The thing is, I WANT to like it, but it just feels very contrived. I've actually been wrestling with this ever since it was brought up, and I'm not trying to refute the quality of the work. I guess I'm puzzled why I don't connect with it a little more.
    Another perhaps similar film I have trouble with is Across The Universe. I like the concept and the attempt, but I can't quite catch the feeling for it.
     
  24. tmoore

    tmoore Forum Resident

    Location:
    Olney, MD
    Neat coincidence for me, with "Get Back" being the #1 record being discussed now -

    I was in London last week, and just before I left on Thursday Aug 31, I walked by 3 Saville Row in London where the famous rooftop concert occurred.

    "Get Back" was played at that concert, but I have never heard that version, as the album version and the single version use the same basic track -- only thing from the rooftop on the album version is the spoken parts at the beginning and end -- "sweet loretta" at the beginning and "hope we passed the audition" at the end.
     
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  25. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    That was all from the Let It Be LP. The actual recording released as a single used two studio sessions: Jan. 27 for the first part up to the "end," and Jan. 28 for the "Get back, Loretta / Your mama's waiting for you . . . " part. In no way was the "rooftop" rendition used on the 45.
     
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